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So...This is a memorable post. Trust Me, there are also many laughable situations I plan on posting.

I am very lucky to have a Dad who was involved and passed on a wealth of experiencing to me over many years.

Ok, truth be told we struggled, hard.

We struggled in the best way you can struggle. We challenged each other, and my Father is a very smart and capable man. I am his redneck offspring. So at times, we wanted to kill each other, or so Mum thought.

He is a bachelor level educated mechanical engineer. He worked for Chrysler for 2 years and I was born in Detroit, in 1969. Troubled times in Detroit. He found his love in manufacturing engineering at a little company called Procter & Gamble. Where I grew up. If You were alive in the 70's through the millennium, if you used Charmin, Bounty or Pampers ... the machines my father helped engineer produced those products. Much of who I am am and what I am able to do, I credit to my father's influence.

This 1st example is very simple.

Have you ever lost your keys or wallet? Retrace your steps. Even in the most complex engineering problem, the only solution is to back-track. You can back-track your way out of any maze (or conundrum) by backing out on either the left or the right. They will both eventually let you out. Reworking every step in reverse will get to the root of any problem. It all depends of how many fractures and rabbit holes of information need to get sorted. The good news is, like cancer, if you catch it early ... the success rate is better. I have reverted back to this simple mantra many, many times. 2 OBXT's will keep you on your trouble shooting toes.

Share your Dad knowledge and your Dad funny stories.
 

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What about the XJ on the lift story?
You can't open with your crowd hook or finale ... come on.

You killing me.

I have several good ones to share. He's a smart man but together we can also get very dumb.
 

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Have you ever lost your keys or wallet? Retrace your steps. Even in the most complex engineering problem, the only solution is to back-track. You can back-track your way out of any maze (or conundrum) by backing out on either the left or the right. They will both eventually let you out. Reworking every step in reverse will get to the root of any problem. It all depends of how many fractures and rabbit holes of information need to get sorted. The good news is, like cancer, if you catch it early ... the success rate is better.
Share your Dad knowledge and your Dad funny stories.
I'll share only the one that you reminded me of....or I'll be up all night. He taught me how to work on my cars, and was more helpful than even youtube.

You mentioned back tracking. My Dad taught me this too. But when he was 81,.....Well, Dad lost his keys. We're talking master keys that many had no duplicates. A couple dozen important keys!
He was VERY smart, but unfortunately I had a hard time getting him off of every last Med and protecting him from the doctors. The heart med made him a little forgetful, but he wasn't that bad. He was smarter than most of the family...probably all. Besides, who hasn't lost something before?

As useful as back tracking normally is this was one rare time that didn't work.
We looked EVERYWHERE that there was even a remote chance of finding his keys...many times. We knew that they HAD to be in the house. A month went by....still No keys! We were desperate. It wasn't like Dad had severe dementia and did stuff like that before.

We prayed fervently, and guess what. God was kind and decided to perform a miracle. I kid you not.

Dad's refrigerator/ freezer was frosting up and I decided for some reason, the first time in my life, to take it apart; even the side wall panel of the warmer main box.
At the bottom INSIDE OF THE refrigerator side wall, behind that sheet metal was.....you guessed it.......the KEYS! LOL!!! 😂

HAHAHAHA! OH man. We looked everywhere,but never wouldve looked there in a hundred years.
I asked Dad what they were doing in THERE?

Dad said, "I don't know???" 😕 🤣

😂 🤣
To this day, its still a mystery. This was like something that goes beyond the George Nori Show! He must've been working on it when I wasn't there the month before. But why the keys were in there is anyone's guess. No disrespect to Dad. Its just one of those funny Dad stories that traildogck reminded me of.

Dad's in heaven now, and we'll have plenty of great stories to recall when its my turn to leave here someday.
I'm writing a couple books on my Dad.
Funny thing is that I've been meaning to start a thread on this very subject, but you beat me to it, Traildogck. Good topic.

This was the promise the Lord gave to Dad two months before he left this world.

“For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved. He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God." - Jesus

As good a man as Dad was and is, he quit trusting his own goodness and put his trust in the good Savior instead to get him there.
It was.... ...One more miracle.
 

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Spent the day with a buddy riding dirt bikes. I lived with my parents in a rural area with lots of trails behind our house. Hundred of acres of wilderness, old apple orchards, and no houses for miles. He was driving, I was still too young to have a license. We were in my driveway talking about the day's ride as he was getting into his car to head home.

My father walked past us to the end of the driveway facing our back yard, looking out at a couple of apple trees in our field. Not exactly a military march, but purposeful. Dad didn't say anything and we didn't pay much attention. He stopped at the edge of the asphalt, swung something by a cord overhead a few times, and let it fly into the trees. He pivoted smartly and walked back to the house. Cam but purposefully.

My buddy and I exchanged puzzled glances, and I asked my father,
"Dad, what was that?"
My father replied,
"Can opener."
Hmmm... Further investigation warranted. So I asked,
"Should I get it down and throw it away?"
He replied,
"No. Leave it there. That's where it belongs."

Apparently the electric can opener had become dull and didn't work properly. I guess it had been malfunctioning for a while and Dad had enough of it. He never has abided by non-functioning machines, especially when they have just one job. When those machines can no longer do that one job they have to go. Dad must have tried to open a can of something, the can opener failed again, and he'd had enough. That can opener stayed up in the apple tree for two years before it fall down one winter. My buddy and I burst out laughing, partly because of the absurdity of the spectacle and partly because it was vintage behavior from my father. He wasn't a scary or violent guy. Just the opposite really. But punishing offending and malfunctioning machinery has always been his thing.
 

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My dad is no longer with us, but he did relate a story to me one time that I'll be happy to tell here to the forum as best I can remember it.

Understand he wasn't a car-person, as he considered them utilitarian and treated them as such until they broke down - which, in the era he was in, was entirely possible with American-built cars. And he also never talked much about war experiences, unless they were funny / happy times. And this story is the funny type.

This was probably the most important drive of his life. On 6 June, 1944, he found himself on the sea approaches to Omaha Beach in Normandy behind the wheel of a US Army 6x6 on a heavy duty landing craft, being part of an Engineering Company that would be responsible for road building and maintenance, and - the part he is most proud of - bridging the Rhine River at Wesel, Germany, in almost 10 days flat. The assault wave had been through earlier in the day, it wasn't an easy going for them, and by late afternoon the beach was finally secured - but moving the heavier equipment up onto the beach had turned into a logistics nightmare. The landing craft's pilot got as close as he could and waited for an opening, however the beach commander wasn't the patient type, being rather busy that day, and ordered it unloaded where they stood, with about 6 feet of water under them. You dare not disobey an order, so the landing craft's front gate dropped, the 6x6 lurched forward, nosed down into the surf, and he promptly shut down the motor to avoid a hydro lock. This situation was not a big deal to the beach commander; rather, just a minor irritation that could have reflected back on him if he let them sit there, so he ordered a tank equipped with a winch over to the area to drag it out of the surf and free up the landing craft, which was stuck with the 6x6 partially out of it. So he entered occupied France that day not proudly driving the truck he was responsible for onto the beach, in order to proceed forward and liberate Europe, but being winched out by a tank up onto the dry sand. The mechanic in their outfit promptly got the plugs dried out, it fired right up, and they were on their way - this was well before computers in cars controlled the ignition systems, of course. Try that test today, I'm sure it would be quite different.

That was his only visit to France. He later spoke of visiting Normandy again in 1995 - the 50 year anniversary of that momentous day - so that he could properly enter France through official immigration and customs and see the beach from the other side of it. He unfortunately never did, even though he outlived 90% of his peers from that momentous day.
 

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My dad was a Butcher, I can sharpen a knife on a steel.. And as I did since I was 10, I would sing

"The only one who could ever teach me was the son of a Butcher man"

Sorry that's all I got, and a warped sense of humor
 

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@Kryptek I have heard of people who misplace their keys in the fridge, but I don't understand it.

I am still relaying wisdom. The whole back-tracking thing. That leads me another one of his adamant policies. 1 modification at a time. If you do a mod on you car and something isn't right, the back-tracking is easy, it's simple. That doesn't mean the mod is wrong, it might be. It might also mean the mod exposed something else worn out.

Hmm, one simple mod is now not so simple. When you perform 4 mods on the same system in the car, now back-tracking is a b*tch. So it's not as simple as finding a wallet, but it's the same as solving complex, real world problems.

I leaned this lesson hard when I modified about 20 different things on Frank at the same down time. Now, I think of my Dad and I take my time, and I mod one mod at a time.
 

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. The mechanic in their outfit promptly got the plugs dried out, it fired right up, and they were on their way - this was before computers in cars controlled the ignition system, of course.
Your Dad is older than mine, for sure. But my father did serve in the Army and was in the motor pool. He is still very much in love with he older, simpler systems.
 

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I learned this lesson hard when I modified about 20 different things on Frank at the same down time. Now, I think of my Dad and I take my time, and I mod one mod at a time.
Not learned from my dad, but from one of the wise heads who guided me at the beginning of my now almost 40 year career at the same company: "One experiment at a time."

I've been able to pass this on to the younger folk who are the age I was when I learned it. I hope they remember me in 40 years and likewise pass it on.
 

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My dad worked for a bottle and scrap metal merchant, travelling the country side collecting old bottles and scrap metal and returning them to the depot to be on sold for a profit. On occasions (from memory during school holidays or sometimes on weekends) dad would take me along with him in the truck for an adventure.

I remember one time we pulled up at a yard out the back of a building, possibly a hotel, and there were hundreds and hundreds of bottles to load. The bottles were loaded into trays and then the trays full of bottles were loaded onto the truck. My job this day (I was probably around eight years old which makes it around 1969) was to throw/drop the trays off the truck onto the ground so they could be filled with bottles. The problem was I managed to over balance and also throw myself off the truck.

I remember dad coming over to pick me up and dust me off (making sure I was OK) and then returning to the job at hand of getting all the bottles loaded so we could head home.

On the way home the truck broke down (I think is was an old Dodge) and even though dad tried everything he knew, he could not get that old truck going. Dad flagged down a passing car who took a message to the owner of the company advising we needed help. By the time help arrived it was quite late but we ended up getting home safely and it certainly was an adventure (for me)

My dad was methodical and I rarely remember him being flustered. Maybe that is why I am mostly like that too.

He is no longer with us having passed away some ten years ago aged 74.

Seagrass
 

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The problem was I managed to over balance and also throw myself off the truck.

I remember dad coming over to pick me up and dust me off (making sure I was OK) and then returning to the job at hand of getting all the bottles loaded so we could head home.

Seagrass
Ahhh ... This reminds me of cutting wood. My folks bought 20 acres in North East Pennsylvania and My Father decided he was heating his house with wood. So my brothers and Me we work horses.

Talk about out of balance...I lost my balance hard once at 15 years old.

My father would constantly come up with these elaborate scenarios to fell trees , NOT
in-line with the way they were leaning. Trees fall the way they lean. Unless an engineer is involved. Well one of Dad's favorite engineering schemes was to have tdck climb the tree with a rope and attach the rope up high.
so we could influence the way the tree fell.

The "family" would then ... "yard" on the rope and "influence" the trajectory. Now my father has dropped trees on buildings, cars ... and in this instance. ME. I was a track star in high school, but one time I needed to wait and pull to make sure.

Which assured the tree and all it's branches would put me now as well.
 

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My dad raced and rallied cars, both on roads and on ice. It was his broken surface/gravel driving and ice racing skill that he passed along to me, and the delicate balance of car control while on slick surfaces while maintaining speed. He spent summers rallying Ford Cortinas through Ontario and Quebec (and even a Corvair too - "perfectly safe" according to him!) and winters racing on the frozen lakes of those same places.

And of course, he spent time passing down the skill to master the Scandinavian flick, still my favourite move on gravel roads to both impress and terrify passengers at the same time (and remarkably easy to do in the Outback with its full time AWD....)

He took driving seriously and witnessed what speed can do if not taken seriously. He told me I was "born with petrol in my veins and a steering wheel in my hands" and made sure I knew how to control a car in any circumstance, and have fun doing it.

I have daughters who love cars and driving...and there's nothing better than to pass down the technique for a perfect Scandanavian flick to yet another generation of petrolheads :)

.
 

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My dad raced and rallied cars, both on roads and on ice. It was his broken surface/gravel driving and ice racing skill that he passed along to me, and the delicate balance of car control while on slick surfaces while maintaining speed. He spent summers rallying Ford Cortinas through Ontario and Quebec (and even a Corvair too - "perfectly safe" according to him!) and winters racing on the frozen lakes of those same places.
Second generation Corvairs were totally safe. Ralph Nader was a tool. Not to mention they were gorgeous for 1965. With a low center of gravity and rear weight bias, I bet they could get down as Rally Car
 

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Which assured the tree and all it's branches would put me now as well.
What I meant to say here is ... My Dad had a system that included dropping trees on top of his kids.
 
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