Subaru Outback Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Super Moderator
2016 3.6 Limited with ES
Joined
·
2,702 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
While a majority of people will fire up the BBQ, today is actually not one of celebration, at least not for me.

I never served and I've never lost family or friends to military action. My FIL was shot and survived Normandy but he left us years ago and I have other acquitenaces and a work colleague who served at the Chosin Reservoir and I know the horrors they experienced.

A day of reflection and gratitude for all those who volunteered, went when asked and never came home to see family and loved ones again.

Thank you to those who have sacrificed and have fallen for this country.

:handoverheart:
 

·
Registered
'18 Outback Touring Dark Blue Pearl 3.6r
Joined
·
1,658 Posts
I agree. The salutation for Memorial Day should not be Happy but Remember or Honor. All of the sacrifices can be appreciated more by listening to an interview a close friend of mine did with the Library of Congress Veteran's Project. http://tinyurl.com/ycqdxgxx
 

·
Master Caster
2005 XT, Mildly Modified...2006 XT Limited, Highly Modifed
Joined
·
16,120 Posts
Agreed.

My Grandfather had a WWII memorial in his yard, facing the street. It contained all the names of the veterans in the town that lost their lives, preserving all of our towns. It had a flower bed and he had a massive flagpole.

I grew up tending to those flowers on the weekends and helped him fly the flag. I helped restore the memorial once while he was still alive and then once again 15 years later.

The memorial was removed when the house left my cousins ownership, 30 years after my Grandfather passed. He was in the army, a school teacher and a mailman.

I miss him, but I am thankful for the lessons passed on.
 

·
Registered
2014 Outback, 2.5 Premium / CVT
Joined
·
119 Posts
My uncle was on this crew. I pray his suffering is over and he has been reunited with his brothers in heaven.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

On 23 March 1951, a C-124 49-0244 flying from Limestone AFB Loring for a transatlantic flight to Mildenhall Royal Air Force Base, Lakenheath, UK, reported a fire in the cargo crates, signaling Mayday. They began jettisoning the crates and announced they were ditching. The C-124 ditched southwest of Ireland.

The last message received by Shannon Aeradio was a revised Estimated Time of Arrival for the destination, which was passed at 01:06. A rescue operation was started when the crew did not make their next routine position report.

The aircraft was intact when it touched down on the ocean. All hands exited the aircraft wearing life preservers and climbed into the inflated 5 man life rafts. The rafts were equipped with cold weather gear, food, water, flares, and Gibson Girl hand crank emergency radios. Shortly after the men were in the life rafts, a B-29 pilot out of Ireland spotted the rafts and the flares that the men had ignited. Their location was reported and the pilot left the scene when his fuel was getting low.

No other United States or Allied planes or ships made it to the ditch site for over 19 hours, until Sunday, March 25, 1951. When the ships arrived, all they found were some charred crates and a partially deflated life raft. Only a few small pieces of wreckage were found 450 miles off the west coast of Ireland. Ships and planes continued searching for the next several days, but not a single body was found. The men of C-124 #49-0244 had disappeared. There is circumstantial evidence that the airmen may have been “snatched” by the Soviet Union for their intelligence value, but their fate remains a mystery. It is a fact that Soviet submarines and surface vessels were active in this area and that the Soviets had no qualms about capturing and holding American servicemen, particularly aviators.

Due to their expertise in nuclear and other defense matters, General Cullen and the other men on the airplane would have been an intelligence windfall to the Soviets. Cullen had been the air service's leading expert on aerial reconnaissance and aerial photography. He also was the head of photography at the Crossroads atom bomb tests in the Pacific in the late 1940s. He also had served as commander of the 2nd Operations Group on two occasions during World War II. An Air Force trophy for excellence in aerial reconnaissance, the Brig. Gen. Paul T. Cullen Award, was named in his honor.

Manifest
Adler, S/Sgt. Glenn E. (509th BWng 830th BSqd)
Adrean, Capt. Phil Bentley (Pilot, 509th BWng 830th BSqd)
Ambrose, Sgt. George W. (509th BWng 4013th ArmElecMaintSqd)
Ambrose, Cpl. Sterling L (509th BWng 715th BSqd
Amsden, S/Sgt. Robert D. (CREW) (Flight Engineer, 509th BWng 2nd StrtgcSpt Sqd)
Armstrong, 2 Lt. Karl R. Jr. (CREW) (Navigator, 509th BWing 2nd StrtgcSptSqd)
Bell, Maj. Robert J. (CREW - In command of flight; squadron ops officer who was doing a route check on the pilots, Capt. Collins & 2nd Lt. Mathers) (Pilot, 509th BWing 2nd StrtgcSptSqd)
Bernis, S/Sgt. Barton C. (CREW) (CE, 509th BWing 2nd StrtgcSptSqd)
Berenberg, Pvt. Dwight A. (Radio Operator, 509th BWing 830th BSqd.)
Bristow, Sgt. Robert R. (Radio Operator, 509th BWng 393rd BSqd)
Broussard, Sgt. Joseph D. (CREW) (CE, 509th BWing 2nd StrtgcSptSqd)
Chute, Cpl. Arthur F. (CREW) (FC, 509th BWing 2nd StrtgcSptSqd)
Collins, Capt. Emmette E. (CREW) (Pilot, 509th BWing 2nd StrtgcSptSqd)
Counsell, Capt. John E. (Bmbdr, 509th BWng 393rd BSqd)
Crow, Cpl. Jack R. (CREW) (FC, 509th BWing 2nd StrtgcSptSqd)
Cullen, Brig. Gen. Paul Thomas (Commander, SAC 2nd Air Force 7th Air Div.)
Davies, Capt. Francis N. (CREW - squadron navigator who was evaluating 2LT Armstrong) (Navigator, 509th BWng 2nd StrtgcSptSqd)
Dubach, Capt. Mark O. (Navigator, 509th BWng 715th BSqd)
Dudek, Capt. Miezyslaw (Bmbdr, 509tyh BWng 393rd BSqd)
Dughman, S/Sgt. Gene D. (509th BWng 393rd BSqd)
Fife, 1LT. Jack Radford (Pilot, 509th BWng 715th BSqd)
Fisher, 2LT William E. Jr. (Navigator, 509th BWng 715th BSqd)
Gray, Col. Kenneth N. (SAC 2nd Air Force 7th Air Div.) (SAC budget officer)
Green, T/Sgt. Charles E. (Flt Eng, 509th BWing 2nd StrtgcSptSqd)
Greene, S/Sgt. Thomas E. (509th BWng 4013th ArmElecMaintSqd)
Hopkins, Lt. Col. James I. (Pilot, SAC 2nd Air Force 7th Air Div.) (chief of SAC's military personnel division)
Jones, S/Sgt Homer Jr. (Radio Operator, 509th BWing 2nd StrtgcSptSqd)
Kampert, Capt. Robert F. (Bmbdr, 509th BWng 393rd BSqd)
Kelly, Capt. Thomas R. (Bmbdr, 509th BWng 830th BSqd)
Krawiec, Capt. Carl N. (Bmbdr, 509th BWng 715th BSqd)
Lee, 2LT. Max D. (Navigator, 509th BWng 830th BSqd)
Lengua, S/Sgt. Nicolo A. (Radio Operator, 509th BWng 830th BSqd)
Lutjeans, Samuel P. (Bmbdr, 509th BWng 715th BSqd)
Mathers, 2Lt. Howard P. (Pilot, 509th BWing 2nd StrtgcSptSqd)
McGee, Sgt. Ronald D. (Radio Operator, 509th BWng 393rd BSqd)
McKoy, Lt. Col. Edwin A. (Pilot, SAC 2nd Air Force 7th Air Div.) (SAC material directorate)
Meckler, Sgt. Frank A. (FltEng, 509th BWng 830th BSqd)
Peterson, Capt. Walter T. (Pilot, 509th BWng 393rd BSqd)
Porter, Capt. Calvin (Bmbdr, 509th BWng 393rd BSqd)
Rafferty, Lawrence E. (Pilot, 509th BWng 715th BSqd)
Scarbrough, M/Sgt. Everett D. (CE, 509th BWing 2nd StrtgcSptSqd)
Stoddard, Maj. Gordon H. (Pilot, SAC 2nd Air Force 7th Air Div.)(assigned to SAC dictorate of plans)
Swisher, Cpl. Clarence G. (509th BWng 393rd BSqd)
Thomas, Cpl. Bobby G. (509th BWng 715th BSqd)
VanGilder, M/Sgt. Taylor H. (509th BWng 509th AvSqd)
Vincent, Capt. Roger S. (Pilot, 509th BWng 830th BSqd) (from Sandwich, IL)
Wagner, Capt. Walter A. Jr. (Pilot, 509th BWng 830th BSqd)
Williamson, M/Sgt. Herbert C. (509th BWng 509th Av Sqd)
Witkowski, Raymond L. (Bmbdr, 509th BWng 715th BSqd)
Zabawa, Capt. Edwin D. (Bmbdr, 509th BWng 830th BSqd)
Zalac, Capt. Frank B. (Pilot, 509th BWng 715th BSqd)
Zweygartt, Capt. John C. (Bmbdr, 509th BWng 830th BSqd)
 

·
Premium Member
2016 OB Premium
Joined
·
95 Posts
See tribute below to another true warrior, who gave his life in service to his country and the tribute from his ships crew. Actual footage from WWII.

God Bless American

http://report.mnb.email/t.js? s=5af33a71bdb41d214f367552&u= 40055656&v=3&key=9566&skey= d4fba87ffd&url=https%3A%2F% 2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fembed% 2Fjpt6Bvr2L-s%3Frel%3D0%26amp% 3Bcontrols%3D0%26amp%3Bshowinf
 

·
Registered
2015 Outback Limited 2.5L, 2014 Forester Limited 2.5L
Joined
·
105 Posts
Hear, Hear! This is a day of remembrance, not a day to celebrate with a BBQ. I did not serve but my son did. He served in Iraq and survived physically, but emotionally, he'll never be the same. He suffers from PTSD and depression. A buddy of his died following surgery, he was in his quarters with him while the guy was Skyping with his wife. Something happened and he just died right there. My son tried in vain to revive him and his poor wife was watching the whole thing on Skype. There are a few of his other friends he served with that were also emotionally scarred and have committed suicide because they couldn't get the help they needed. To top it all off, his birthday is Memorial Day and he just looks at it as a celebration of death and he has a rough time with it. Birthdays are supposed to be happy but not for him.

For all the thousands who have served and given their lives, we all owe a debt of gratitude we can't repay.
 

·
Master Caster
2005 XT, Mildly Modified...2006 XT Limited, Highly Modifed
Joined
·
16,120 Posts
You want to see real continued courage. The Warrior games come back here next week to the AFB in the Springs. The last time they were run here were in 2015, My baby Bro, a second career Navy Man competed in cycling. He is NOT severely injured or disabled, but wounded. Many of the other veteran athletes are about the biggest lumps of courage and determination any of you can whiteness.

https://dodwarriorgames.com/

It is free and open to the public.

I will be there for sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
I was doing alright with Memorial Day this time around until a buddy I served with posted a picture of him in dress whites kneeling, flag in his clasped hands, extended to a spouse at the funeral of a fallen servicemember.

I am not a combat veteran, though I made 2 deployments in the USN aboard USS Enterprise. Today is not my day. Today is the day for all my brother's and sisters. 2015 was a bad year for me, I lost 5 shipmate's to suicide and another 5 to illness and accidents. It seemed like it would never end.

So thank you all for remembering those that aren't with us anymore.
 

·
Super Moderator
2016 3.6 Limited with ES
Joined
·
2,702 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I was doing alright with Memorial Day this time around until a buddy I served with posted a picture of him in dress whites kneeling, flag in his clasped hands, extended to a spouse at the funeral of a fallen servicemember.

I am not a combat veteran, though I made 2 deployments in the USN aboard USS Enterprise. Today is not my day. Today is the day for all my brother's and sisters. 2015 was a bad year for me, I lost 5 shipmate's to suicide and another 5 to illness and accidents. It seemed like it would never end.

So thank you all for remembering those that aren't with us anymore.
Tough to hear, micachu. Most people think of Memorial Day as great sales and a short work week. Few, outside of the military, understand the heros are the one who didn't come back and we are honored to stand humbly in their shadow.

PTSD is a bitch. Not involving me personally but rather professionally, a former Marine Sgt watched as one of his young Marines pulled a grenade in an underground living area and said, "I just can't take it anymore." and let the spoon go. That came after the Sgt's first night in country was the Tet 3 offensive and his job was to pick up body parts from barbed wire, roofs and wherever else found. Burned bodies everywhere and he was stunned at just what's inside a person once it's laying everywhere.

He held it in until the 90s and has been in therapy ever since. Drinking away the demons doesn't work.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top