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2019 Touring (Canadian Model) with Eyesight
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Discussion Starter #1
Someone pulled up for gas at work yesterday driving a new Rav. I saw he had a local Toyota dealer emblem on his jacket.

I mentioned that I was on the fence with my purchase of my car, between a Rav and an Outback.

Obviously he poopooed the Subie but he mentioned something that many people say which I find untrue.

He stated the high maintenance costs of a Subaru. Well when I read the owner's manual i just see regular maintenance that any car requires. In addition to this, Toyota's service rates are not cheap either.

Due to circumstances I would not get into a debate with him but he left me a little frustrated by his blatant disregard for the truth.

FYI he wasn't even in sales but the shuttle guy.

Oh and Subie can't be all that bad if Toyota owns 25% of Subie stock
 

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2019 Touring (Canadian Model) with Eyesight
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Discussion Starter #3
And Subaru fan boys aren't guilty of the same thing?
Point well taken.

I was wondering if there is any truth to his statement and if not where does this come from?
 

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2019 Touring (Canadian Model) with Eyesight
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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks @BRUCE

So from the data sources you provided, the Subie has an annual cost of $27 to $178 more than the Rav. Now, how much is an annual recovery tow because the Rav got suck in the mud/snow? ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well, my experience with a Toyota 4-Runner did not remotely match up to their phony sterling reputation for "quality".
I own a 2006 Corolla and a 2011. The older one, albeit older technology, runs more reliable than the newer one. You can only ride your own quality reputation for so long.
 

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SubaruOutback.org Founder
2018 Outback Limited 2.5L - 100,000+ miles
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He stated the high maintenance costs of a Subaru.
It's just typical car salesman trash talk, take it with a grain of salt. High maintenance cost? I would have said, "Compared to what?" Next thing they will say is some slippery, relativistic quip that is patently BS more likely than not.

I sold a lot of cars talking a lot of trash on others cars during my illustrious career in the car business. I learned that you have to be very careful as occasionally a customer would have to switch to considering a specific used car that I would want to have avoided trash talking.

What it is really all about is instilling doubt in the mind of a customer so that they don't buy anything that you don't want them to buy. If I was selling a brand other than Subaru I would have a lot of ammo to use against them just like this Toyota guy did, it is just the nature of the business.
 

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Part of this could be the older head gasket issues. I'm assuming those are a thing of the past.

FWIW, I had a 2012 Rav4 for a short period of time and hated it. We had (and the daughter still has) a 2005 Rav4 that we love (at about 195k miles). It's not so much that the 2012 cost a lot to repair, it was just a PITA to do things like oil changes, rotate tires, etc. Also, an acquaintance did have a huge repair bill on his Toyota which may have had the same engine, so I decided not to risk it.
 

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2016 Outback 3.6R Limited w/ EyeSight
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I would expect Toyota to be slightly cheaper because of Toyota Care.

The Mrs. Has a 2015 Rav4. It has been a great car.....
 

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I'm not sure the shuttle driver would have much of an influence as to what car I choose to buy.

Side note: Every time I have gotten a ride home from the Subaru dealership with the shuttle driver the shuttle vehicle has been a Ford Explorer.
 

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2008 OB Limited 2.5i, Portland OR USA
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If you are comparing maintenance costs, I would just consider the standard service items and avoid catastrophic things like head gasket failures.

And all they would be able to go by is "book rate" xxxx miles service items that they advertise, done at average mileage accumulation rates. These may be slightly lower for the Rav4, who knows?

But I would offer that the real comparison ought to be the average maintenance and catastrophic failure costs that most owners actually experience outside of their 3/36 warranty. And this ought to factor in the lower cost of using independent mechanics, as that's how a lot of owners do things. The fact that dealer service rates are a game is evident if you compare the same work done on a Toyota to that for a Lexus, when all else is equal.

Me? I don't care that much when the numbers I see in this thread are so close between Subaru and Toyota. If it gets to a comparison of service rates of a Subaru versus BMW, Audi, Mercedes, Range Rover, or Volvo, then I care.
 

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2010 Outback 3.6R 2014 Legacy 2.5i 2003 Legacy L special edition (retired to backup)
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I find that my Subaru (all 3 of them) are fairly reliable and require about average maintenance...Also I believe that Toyota's oil change intervals are longer than Subaru...
 

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SubaruOutback.org Founder
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I find that my Subaru (all 3 of them) are fairly reliable and require about average maintenance...Also I believe that Toyota's oil change intervals are longer than Subaru...
I am not sure about running any 0w16 oil on a 10,000 mile interval.
 

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I don’t know. They are talking about a $200 a year difference. I don't really see that as a decision point making a hill of beans difference.

Weve put over 170k kilometres (100k miles) on a 2015, and beat it through winters in northern Ontario, salt, rough backroads. I do nothing special. I maintain it as any other piece of equipment. Change the oil every 10k kilometres, mobile 1, regular Mtce of brakes and tires etc etc etc.

I’ve only had to change a wheel bearing. I did the plugs on it at 160k, just because.

Its been a good car. No complaints.
 

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I am not sure about running any 0w16 oil on a 10,000 mile interval.
I would not go that far...but 7K seems fairly reasonable Honda used that since the 1980's until recently when they switched to 10K changes...and they also have problems with oil consumption and fuel dilution...
 

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2020 OB Limited, Titanium & Magnetite Grays
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I am not sure about running any 0w16 oil on a 10,000 mile interval.
On the other side I have seen data supporting extended oil changes when using full synthetic motor oil Planet-9 reference. I have found other mfg that have longer intervals, ≥10K miles, thus lowering their CoO, examples: Porsche recommendations Mercedes 10K mi oil change: Lexus RX350 10K mile oil change Toyota RAV4 10K mile oil change Note that Porsche once (1990s) had a 20K mi oil change listed. Data once published in Popular Science supports the position that ester synthetics will require less frequent oil changes. This is a first widely published extensive report on synthetic testing. Popular Science, starting page 90
 
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