Subaru Outback Forums banner

21 - 31 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,379 Posts
On the other side I have seen data supporting extended oil changes when using full synthetic motor oil Planet-9 reference.
The most controversial information in your source was this:

* A 2007 Ford study found 12,000 mile old oil actually lubricated better than fresh oil; it had 10-15% lower friction and an order of magnitude lower wear rates. They found samples changed at 3,000 miles and 12,000 miles had very similar compositions of tribochemical lubrication films (Gangopadhay et al, 2007). I unfortunately can't find the full paper; I'd really like to see more detail on this because it's completely counter-intuitive. I've heard this mentioned before in various oil threads, but this is the first time I've found an actual study about it.
There's other data that shows that Turbo GDI engines have specific issues with fuel dilution of the oil, and excess soot loading that leads to timing chain wear (and elongation), not to mention LSPI, which it appears depending on the specific formulation, old oils may not combat LSPI as well as fresh oil.
 

·
On the Super Mod Squad
2002 Pair: 3.0 VDC Wag & 2.5 Limited Sedan
Joined
·
25,967 Posts
FYI he wasn't even in sales but the shuttle guy.
the dealer person seems to be repeating a long held adage, = pick on the competition, do it easily in short statements to match all expectations. = see "twitter"

keep in mind that if he repeats what the sales guys say, and he can steer a customer their way, he hopefully gets a nickel,....

and if he said toyotas were crap,...and a member of the public told the stealership manager what he said what would happen to him.
 

·
Registered
2020 OB Limited, Titanium & Magnetite Grays
Joined
·
456 Posts
The most controversial information in your source was this:



There's other data that shows that Turbo GDI engines have specific issues with fuel dilution of the oil, and excess soot loading that leads to timing chain wear (and elongation), not to mention LSPI, which it appears depending on the specific formulation, old oils may not combat LSPI as well as fresh oil.
So could it be said that the XT is dictating the 6K oil change interval requirement for both engines?
 

·
On the Super Mod Squad
2002 Pair: 3.0 VDC Wag & 2.5 Limited Sedan
Joined
·
25,967 Posts
So could it be said that the XT is dictating the 6K oil change interval requirement for both engines?


In traditional things on this board known as Outback XT 2005-2009: oil change intervals are 3750 miles
 

·
Registered
2012 Outback Ltd 3.6r
Joined
·
438 Posts
FWIW, the local Hyundai dealership told us the same thing, when my wife was cross-shopping the Tucson to the Crosstrek, which she ultimately leased. Subaru's very conservative on the oil change intervals and general maintenance, compared to many other models. - Keep in mind, no DIT in either model, but, perhaps it's Subaru looking to keep them all on the same routine, in case they do put a smaller turbo in various models.

Of course the Tucson we test drove had a problem, which they denied, and couldn't get out of it's own way, or accelerate into traffic at all....the Crosstrek would have blown its doors off, it was that messed up. (I think the trans was starting in 2nd or 3rd gear, which was a known issue at the time with their DCT).

With the standard AWD, I'm sure there's some additional costs involved, having two differentials to check/change fluid on for instance. Newer models have additional brake pad/rotor wear for the torque vectoring on turns, but that's true of any vehicle with those options. I've never owned a Toyota or Hyundai, although both step-sons bought Hyundai. So far, my Outback's been the most reliable vehicle I've owned, with the most cost spent on her being the Rallitek Springs, 1" Spacers, and KYB Struts, which weren't required, but really made the suspension nice when hauling stuff. I've spent more on prior vehicles to replace things that wore out or broke.
 

·
Registered
2020 OB Limited, Titanium & Magnetite Grays
Joined
·
456 Posts
I suppose it could be... but isn't the 2.5 also GDI now? Other than LSPI you still have the carbon and timing chain issues.
So the issue that I recall in this thread is the cost of ownership for the OB. One justification for this concern can be seen in the frequency of oil changes is noticeability different in the Subaru. Once this is established, and it has been established, then it can/should be used as ammunition to certify concern about the CoO.

On the point about the GDI causing an issue with the oil thus requiring frequent oil changes, then why are Porsche, Audi, BMW, Hyundai, Kia, Mazda, Mercedes-Benz, Nissan, Lexus, Saab, Subaru and Volkswagen, all with GDI, going with 10K mile oil changes (of all that I checked). From the view point of this customer, Subaru has introduced unjustified requirements resulting is higher CoO.
 

·
Registered
2019 Subaru Outback
Joined
·
406 Posts
From the view point of this customer, Subaru has introduced unjustified requirements resulting is higher CoO.
From the viewpoint of this consumer those other manufacturers are setting oil change intervals based on improving their ability to make a sales pitch, and their own interests above the interests of their consumers (or at least their consumers who keep vehicles over 100,000 miles--the others won't be hurt).
 

·
SubaruOutback.org Founder
2018 Outbacks, Grey Premium & Silver Limited
Joined
·
4,792 Posts
On the other side I have seen data supporting extended oil changes when using full synthetic motor oil Planet-9 reference. I have found other mfg that have longer intervals, ≥10K miles, thus lowering their CoO, examples: Porsche recommendations Mercedes 10K mi oil change: Lexus RX350 10K mile oil change Toyota RAV4 10K mile oil change Note that Porsche once (1990s) had a 20K mi oil change listed. Data once published in Popular Science supports the position that ester synthetics will require less frequent oil changes. This is a first widely published extensive report on synthetic testing. Popular Science, starting page 90
I was referring to 0w16 oil usage specifically, not extended oil change intervals in general.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Someone pulled up for gas at work yesterday driving a new Rav. I saw he had a local Toyota dealer emblem on his jacket.

I mentioned that I was on the fence with my purchase of my car, between a Rav and an Outback.

Obviously he poopooed the Subie but he mentioned something that many people say which I find untrue.

He stated the high maintenance costs of a Subaru. Well when I read the owner's manual i just see regular maintenance that any car requires. In addition to this, Toyota's service rates are not cheap either.

Due to circumstances I would not get into a debate with him but he left me a little frustrated by his blatant disregard for the truth.

FYI he wasn't even in sales but the shuttle guy.

Oh and Subie can't be all that bad if Toyota owns 25% of Subie stock
Apples and oranges comparison? It is the Forester than competes with the RAV 4, not the Outback.
 

·
Registered
2010 Outback 3.6R 2014 Legacy 2.5i 2003 Legacy L special edition (retired to backup)
Joined
·
939 Posts
^ not really anymore as both vehicles offer similar cargo capacity, power, etc in base trim.
 
21 - 31 of 31 Posts
Top