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Brucey
'17 3.6 Limited
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10,483 Posts
Discussion Starter #1

So I made this for our Subaru. But it still should apply to pretty much any vehicle.

It's meant for people new to the hobby. Yet experienced ones should hear me out too.

Friends. You're a lot saver traveling in a group. If any one vehicle is disabled you still have ways of recovering it or yourself. A way of communicating with them is a big help here. I like using small handheld radios.

A spare wheel and tire. It's the most common thing that can leave you stranded. Make sure you have a way of removing and installing the spare. I use a factory jack with some wood blocks as a spacer.

A recovery strap. Great for pulling each other out. The kinetic straps stretch and are a lot safer in the equipment. No shock load

Tools. I keep a couple wrenches and sockets. A screw driver and a multi tool on hand. You can fit a lot in a small space. I also like to bring a sawzall and chainsaw with me to clear fallen trees on the trail.

Your brain. It's the most powerful muscle you have. Use it. Don't be stupid. You can get into a lot of trouble very quickly.

Anyone else know of anything else obvious I'm missing?
 

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204 Posts
A recovery strap. Great for pulling each other out. The kinetic straps stretch and are a lot safer in the equipment. No shock load
I'd probably list off the bits and bobs needed. I've seen people who just had a strap and one shackle. For example I carry an extra receiver hitch just in case.


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2010 2.5 CVT Premium
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1,011 Posts
There can be an endless list of stuff to bring but like any adventure; letting at least one person (who is not going with you) know whereabouts you're going and when you expect to be back.
 

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2008 OB Limited 2.5i, Portland OR USA
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5,162 Posts
I would suggest emergency snacks and drinking water - and that in fact applies to anything you do in the outdoors, on foot or in vehicles. Sometimes it isn't just a simple matter of go or no go, but one of re-routing along a longer alternative, bivvying and waiting for daylight when you can see things a lot better, waiting several hours for a repair to be completed, etc.
 

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2019, Subaru Outback Limited 3.6R
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712 Posts
I would suggest a 9MM Glock and several extra clips.
I'll raise you 1mm.
Offroad I bring my Glock 20 10mm takes care or 2 and 4 legged problems.
Onroad a the civilized Glock 19 9mm will suffice :)
 

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3,103 Posts
Yeah 10mm is still best mm.
until you get them in a socket set, then they move themselves when you aren't looking, and you can't ever find them again. If bringing those with you, bring at least 3. Two will get lost.
 

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2019, Subaru Outback Limited 3.6R
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712 Posts
Banana clips are the only true clips
 

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On the Super Mod Squad
2002 Pair: 3.0 VDC Wag & 2.5 Limited Sedan
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25,758 Posts
these threads have been written before, but this one has a @Brucey video.

what I need if venturing up a dirt road within a mile of my house to chase after off road pickups / jeeps:
a pick / shovel, and have backed down, & gone home to get them. just to remove a protruding loose boulder in 3 minutes vs. dragging the car on it. MIght have been able to pull it with a folding trenching tool and some gloves, but I have full sized picks and shovels and a empty station wagon,
...and don't even own a trenching tool today. (maybe soon).
 

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‘19 2.5 Outback Abyss Blue 2” lift
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31 Posts
Shovel, strap and detailed info for the family in case you don’t show up when expected and then people will know where to start looking for you!
 

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2020 Onyx XT
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111 Posts
Dead battery = dead in the water, so I always have a jump starter. I second having plenty of food/water, as well as basic emergency supplies: space blanket, space bag, flashlights and extra batteries (extra batteries for everything)--flares, first aid kit, etc. YES: tell people. I remember the last line of 127 Hours, after he survived the ultimate harrowing adventure: "And he ALWAYS tells people where he's going." My family is accustomed to receiving messages such as "I'm on the Narrows Trail off Death Valley Road, I'll be either on the main trail or somewhere in the Papoose Flat/Narrows/Harkless Flat area. I expect to be back Monday evening. If you don't hear from me, call Inyo Sheriffs." A lot of peace of mind from doing this religiously.
 
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