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I'm with johnre, plug that bad boy and GO!
I'd use the ubiquitous sticky string and if it needs two, so be it. But I'll wager just one plug will do it. You'll know depending how much resistance you get when you run the reaming tool through to clean the puncture.
 

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If there's enough tread left, that puncture is in an area that is fixable with a plug. Typically, the head of the foreign object that is sticking out is a lot larger than the diameter of the puncture, due to it being repeatedly hammered down by normal driving.
Except in this case there is nothing to get hammered down. That is a rock, fresh out of a rock crusher , with edges like razor blades. I won't know how big the rest of it is or how big of a hole it made until it is removed. A coworker saved the one out of his and it was about an inch and a half long and about as big around as my pinky finger and sharp enough to use as an arrowhead.

Is your employer compensating everyone for these 180 flats? They could have, after all, used a magnetic road sweeper on the road bed after getting down to the road base - the kind you often see used after a severe accident that throws metal particles about an area.
Since it is crushed rock there is nothing that would be picked up with a magnet. As far as compensation, we will see. This was posted recently so I'm guessing they will be doing something.
472215



I heard that the company calculated in advance that they could replace every tire on every employee vehicle and still be money ahead on what they saved by supplying this material in-house rather than buying the appropriate stuff elsewhere and having it hauled in. No idea if they really calculated it that way but it is believable. We are talking thousands of tons of crushed rock for the road they are rebuilding, which is somewhere around five miles long. I also heard that the number of flats may actually be closer to 300. The last we heard they were supposed to start paving the road tomorrow but that could change.
 

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I'm with johnre, plug that bad boy and GO!
I'd use the ubiquitous sticky string and if it needs two, so be it. But I'll wager just one plug will do it. You'll know depending how much resistance you get when you run the reaming tool through to clean the puncture.
My thoughts are that it can be either plugged or patched as well but it is possible there could be damage to the cords. I would prefer a patch but if the tire shop says they don't want to do it I will probably try a plug myself. In fact, I would like to try using my Stop & Go repair kit to see just what it will do but that type of hole is probably better suited to the string type plug. I will know more once the rock gets pulled out.
 

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2019 Outback 3.6R Touring Wilderness Green Metallic
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Well the tire dealer said they won't touch this. Looks like I'll be attempting to plug this myself.
View attachment 472454
Oh yeah. I'd totally plug that with the sticky strings from SafetySeal. I've been plugging my own tires for a while now - quicker than going down the road to discount tire and waiting around.
 

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I "gummy worm" tire plug (long sticky thing) will easily plug that hole without a problem. I have used them in a similar location numerous times without a problem.

Seagrass
 

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Ended up bringing it to a shop and getting a patch put on instead of trying a plug. Tire should be fine. I will only be running it for a couple of weeks until I put my winter tires and wheels on. Now tires don't have to be a factor in making the decision as to whether to buy the car when my lease is up. I'm still leaning towards keeping it and if I do I will likely be going with different tires in the spring anyway, but at least I wasn't forced to make the move now.

This is the rock that caused the puncture. You can't really see it in the picture, but the side edges are about as sharp as an Indian arrowhead.

472573
 

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2019 Outback 3.6 Touring, for my lovely wife.
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this is all you need, been using this product for about 30 years. I owned a auto repair shop and sold lots of tires, plugged hundreds of tires and never had a problem.
just one mans opinion...

473364
 

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I had only a few hundred miles on these tires when I got expended brass through one of my tires. Ended up replacing it rather than plugging it.
473365
 

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this is all you need, been using this product for about 30 years. I owned a auto repair shop and sold lots of tires, plugged hundreds of tires and never had a problem.
just one mans opinion...

View attachment 473364
I’ve used those as well for a long time. Had to repair an almost new tire a few months back. Carry them on one of the motorcycles. Good stuff.
 

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1" from the tread edge was always our rule in the old days. Now the Ontario government requires a plug and patch, so really it has to be at least 2" from the edge.

Plug and patch was enacted about 10-12 years ago in Ontario (and in other jurisdictions as well at differing times) as a safety response due to some people plugging tires at home improperly. IMO it is overkill, as I had plugs in tires for literally years that never failed and never caused a belt shift.
 
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