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I don't think this post is off topic. It helps a lot for people on the fence about buying a tool for instance. If the car can re-learn sensor position, assuming the IDs are in the ECU, then it might be worth breaking down and paying a dealer for the initial programming knowing you can rotate your own tires thereafter.
 

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Happy to Report Success

I'll post the TL;DR version here and create a new thread with the details (and add the link later), but after a couple hours and a few inconveniences I am thrilled to report that Tire Rack and Autel have cracked the code.

Basic steps to success:

  1. Buy tires & wheels from Tire Rack with sensors for a 2019 Subaru Outback (I assume they now know what works for different models if there is indeed a difference but I"m only reporting what worked on my car).
  2. Buy an Autel TS508 TPMS tool (also from Tire Rack if you're so inclined).
  3. Use the sensor scan and OBD Relearn procedure on the 508 for a 2018 Outback to program the ECU.
  4. Profit!
Put the new wheels and tires on, used the 508 to read them to make sure they worked, followed the OBD Relearn procedure under the Advanced menu on the 508, then drove the car for 2 miles and about 6 minutes. And it all worked. Individual readings appeared on the pressure screen and no errors shown. I even verified that the system had the positions correct.

So there you go - we can finally do it ourselves again.

 

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Looking forward to a step by step guide becoming a sticky.

Did you need to update the software on the TS508, or did it work out of the box? Also, do you have the part number of the TPMS sensors from your invoice?

The part number on my sensors was 3076/20602. The way TireRack listed them on my invoice was S202 / 320602 SCHRDR 433Mhz G2 RBR V. Sensor, rubber valve pre-installed.

I'm putting my snows on this weekend and this may be the solution I've been looking for.
 

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I will toss my support in for Tires Direct. I didn't even buy tires from them; Firestone failed me twice (lied about programming the first time, then invited me back to do it but couldn't).

drove out to the nearest TD. they came out to the car, guy listened when I explained that '17 Impreza might work. it did.

I have working TPMS sensors. TD gets my business, and my appreciation.

short version: Tires Direct has amazing customer service. '17 Impreza trick worked on my 2019 3.6 limited
 

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The transmission frequency, in this case 315 megahertz or 433 megahertz is assigned by the gov't agency that determines all radio transmission bands. The FCC in the United States picked 315. Japan and much of Asia followed suit. The agency in Europe picked 433. The FCC did not object to supporting two bands in the US. Otherwise European cars would have to support two systems as well.
@Fibber2, first, thank you for the knowledge you have been able to share with us on the MY18 TPMS. I've got a 2018 Outback arriving in a week or two and since I live in Germany and we spend many winter weekends skiing in the Alps, dedicated snows are a must. Actually, just about everyone here has a second set of wheels/tires because you're liable in an accident if you're on the wrong type of tires. I quoted the above because it got me wondering if the EU-spec Subarus had 433 MHz sensors the entire time? The EU-Spec cars are made in Japan if it matters in any way.

All the main online tire retailers in Germany don't differentiate the 2018 Outback from the 2015+ models. What I don't know is if it's because they simply don't know or because the EU-Spec models have always been using the 433 MHz sensors. Keep in mind, Subaru is tiny in Germany. Last year they sold ~9k cars in total. There are probably dealerships in New England or Colorado that could match that ;) If you happen to know if 315 MHz are allowed/used in Europe please enlighten me. I'll also call into our equivalent of TireRack/DT and see what they say about the TPMS sensors they would supply.

Edit: I called and they didn't know of any change for the 2018 models but wouldn't give me any details on the sensors they would have supplied. They told me to get the full TSN number (a German vehicle code that describes a car model and configuration) which I won't have until I pick up the vehicle.

Edit#2: From what I can tell all the EU TPMS sensors are 433 MHz. I finally managed to get a part number out of an online retailer, one that actually differentiated between the 2018 and the 2015-2017 Outbacks and they supply the same sensor for both: ProSens 73907101. From what I can see this is a 433 MHz sensor.

Your German word for the day is: Reifendruckkontrollsystem :D

Thanks,
Bigfork
 

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@Bigfork thanks for the great EU information. Glad to see this is mostly an American problem.

There are probably dealerships in New England or Colorado that could match that.
My local dealer, one of at least 15 in Massachusetts, claims to have moved over 16,000 Subaru cars (of all models) in 2017.
 

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@Fibber2...Keep in mind, Subaru is tiny in Germany. Last year they sold ~9k cars in total. There are probably dealerships in New England or Colorado that could match that...

Thanks,
Bigfork
@Bigfork thanks for the great EU information. Glad to see this is mostly an American problem.

My local dealer, one of at least 15 in Massachusetts, claims to have moved over 16,000 Subaru cars (of all models) in 2017.
I'm pretty sure if you live in Colorado or Oregon owning a Suburu is a hard requirement for citizinship. :laugh:
 

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My local dealer, one of at least 15 in Massachusetts, claims to have moved over 16,000 Subaru cars (of all models) in 2017.
The average car dealership in the US (all brands) sells about 1,000 cars a year, around 3 a day. Selling 16,000 cars in one year would be more than 40 cars a day, or an average of 3 to 4 cars an hour every hour that the doors are open, every single day of the year. (If you've ever spent time in a dealership, that's highly unlikely.) I suspect whoever said that owns multiple dealerships, and it's the total for all of them combined.
 

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Selling 16,000 cars in one year would be more than 40 cars a day, or an average of 3 to 4 cars an hour ...
Good sanity check. Heuberger Motors in Colorado Springs was long acknowledged to be the #1 Subaru dealer in the U.S. based on new car sales volume. I don't know whether they're still #1 or not, but back in 2014-2016 they were reported to be selling 400 to 600 new Subarus a month ... which would be 4,800 to 7,200 a year.
 

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Update from Germany. Finally got the extra set of wheels and tires mounted up. No issue with the TPMS sensors. As others mentioned, it started reading pressures after a few minutes of driving.


Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk
 

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Can;t speak to your tires, but I bought the TPM sensors for each tire at Costo. Install and programming costs were half the price of the dealer.
You are supposed to replace these sensors periodically, I can't recall how often.
 

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Can;t speak to your tires, but I bought the TPM sensors for each tire at Costo. Install and programming costs were half the price of the dealer.
Not sure if your comment was directed at me or not but basically here in Germany the issue is a non-issue. The TPMS sensors were always the 433 MHz type and tire places don't have any issue cloning them and getting you up and running. I just wanted to post an update in case the 2-3 other non-US/Canada members might want to know ;) The sensors I got were from Reifen.com (the largest online tire retailer in Germany) and they shipped clonable sensors with my order. The installation cost ~$30 as the tires were already mounted to wheels with the sensors inside. Cost of the sensors was €130 (~$150).

If anyone cares the tires are Blizzak DM-V2's on 17x7" Borbet W's.
 
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