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If this is the same charging cable as the Crosstrek Hybrid, the MSRP is a little over $1000. Personally, I am looking into a Grizzle EVSE solution that can be configured to your needs. I like the idea of a 240V20A which will charge at 16A, for about 3.8 kW per hour. That’s more than enough for me. I may go 30A for it to be more future proof if my home can support it.
 

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Yes there could be better looking front or that front could even look different. I mean front has that shape for petrol cars because engine is there and radiator in front. For ev car front doesnt need to be that shape at all anymore but they still making car as old times just putting e motors in it
 

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Their specs says it takes a J1772 plug, which is pretty much standard for everyone except Tesla.
Post was more about the included OEM 120V AC charger rather than actual standard, but yes, glad they aren’t using Chademo.
 
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Post was more about the included OEM 120V AC charger rather than actual standard, but yes, glad they aren’t using Chademo.
Got it; I was thrown off by the added reference to the Grizzle EVSE, which wasn't related to the OEM charger. I would go with your approach of using the higher capacity EVSE 240 V for home, and the portable OEM 120V for emergency use while traveling.
 

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Absolutely. If my OEM one failed, I would likely replace it with a Grizzl-e mini when it launches next year, or buy a Tesla Mobile Connector and use a TeslaTap Tesla to J1772 adapter. My only comment was really geared towards the cost of the charging cable which seems excessive.

Apparently there are people that use the TMC with an adapter for their non Teslas anyway since they provide alternative forms of charging (5-2, 6-20, 6/14-30, 6/14-50) all in a single unit with changeable plug adapters, which is highly convenient.

Still on the fence about the Solterra because I may just hold out for an Outback EV. The million dollar question is how much gas will be and what will valuation be for an ICE. It could go either way - higher because you can’t get them anymore, or lower because nobody wants them.
 

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Believe it or not, I installed a ClipperCreek HCS-50 (40A charging capacity) EVSE in my garage a few years ago, even before having an EV in the family, only because the state of Oregon was subsidizing the installation cost 50% and suddenly announced they would terminate the program. With plenty of warning, I put it in and snagged the rebate - the theory being that it would be needed anyway at some point, and if the house were sold it could be more than recouped. It did have to be hardwired, though, to qualify for the rebate - I guess they thought that subsidizing a plug-in unit could result in sham rebates folleded by reselling it on the open market out-of-state.

Given the current price on this capable unit ($635) is still around the same amount as my pre-subsidy purchase price, I would agree, the OEMs price seems very high.
 

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That’s a great play. Unfortunately, my home is very old, and while it doesn’t have knob and tube wiring (or whatever that was) or fuses, the older panel is maxed and requires a replacement. There’s no opportunity for subpanel or anything like that - I’ve had about 4 different electricians look at it. So, it’s not just the relatively straightforward cost of installing L2 EVSE, I also have to deal with my ~$3000 panel job.

Also unfortunately, the federal credit for some cash back is expiring also. I’m looking into something with my utility company when we do our panel upgrade down the line but I think it’s mostly stuff on their side, like meter to pole, rather than meter to my car.

Part of me wanted to go for the Crosstrek PHEV as a stepping stone to a full EV, since I wouldn’t care as much about L1 or L2 charging, but it seemed like an awful lot of money for not a lot of car. In fact, it was more expensive than my Onyx XT was.
 
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In America, we'll be getting two variants: XLE and Limited.
Interesting video - I would suspect that the Solterra would be very similar, but they are 'sister' vehicles.

If the performance, comfort, and handling were good, and the effective range was closer to 300+ miles, it would make me interested enough to take a look at one.

I still have hope that Toyota will continue with their hydrogen fuel development program. Overall, I think that eventually, it could (and I stress could) surpass current EV technology.

We'll see.
 

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I don't even like traditional sunroofs here in sunny Hawaii we try to avoid the sun not bask in it 24/7. I see so many tourists with skin red like a cooked lobster because they decided to expose as much skin as possible and ride a moped or open-top vehicle. My advice to anyone visiting a sunny location is to stay protected until you actually get to the beach or whatever. Just imagine being sunburned before you even reach the beach. Not fun.



Indeed. The same applies in Florida.

There's a whole lotta folks visiting the Land of the Mouse that are cooked to medium rare, and subsequently five steps closer to Melanoma City and Cataracts Country on their trip home.

As you recommended, respect your skin and your eyes, and avoid the sun as you can. That's why I would never buy a vehicle with a vista roof, and my windows are tinted.
 

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Well the new EV has all the bells and whistles. Toyota is good at providing those in their ICE cars too. It's a very respectable effort, nothing for them to be ashamed of. I do find myself wondering if a lot of the body and the layout of the EV didn't already exist, as a kind of next gen Rav4, or Lexus, for example. Still this must have put stress on Toyota Engineering: in 2-3 yrs they had to come up with a new drivetrain, new floor pan, new controls and UI, and lots of software.

IMO Toyota sells well because their cars have so many average to very good features so the sheer number lets them win on points against many other brands. Plus they have built their reputation on reliability. I expect the EV to fit in with the same approach.

I believe Toyota is also very aware of the balancing act that is needed. Their EV must be good enough to compete competently with other EVs. But it cannot steal the show from the ICE cars that still bring in most of the cash, and maybe already have slim margins. For example to start with, the EV will only be sold in 2 higher trims, IMO so as not to be in direct competition either with the cheaper ICE cars, or the top of the line ICEs.

I think Toyota will keep on with their H2 research. For one thing IIRC Hyundai is still working on that, and Toyota wouldn't want to let them get too far ahead. And IMO FCEVs have a lot of potential.
 

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I am mixed on Hydrogen. It is very expensive (more than gasoline), takes longer, and harder to find (impossible outside CA). Could it catch on? Yeah, sure. But it seems like electricity tech is advancing at an exponential rate. At the end of the day, the hydrogen is turning into electricity anyway, so it’s an extra step.

The trick will be to get sustainable electricity generation in widespread use and the people with EVs can power their cars at home using solar, and utility companies will advance to more and more renewable sources.

Perhaps a hydrogen plug in hybrid will be a long term solution as well for those that do a lot of highway miles. This way, they will have very short stops on the highway to refill the canisters and be on their way, using hydrogen when the battery gets low.

End game is emission zero, my man, from start to finish (generation to use) Anyway we get there is fine with me.
 

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IMO H2 storage and production problems will be solved to overcome current hindrances. Same for batteries and electrical generation. Then we will have 2 systems to use where each is best.

I get a kick that Musk calls them “fool cells" bc don't we know if he sees a good way to use them, Tesla will do so in a heartbeat.
 

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The obstacles to Hydrogen:
  • Most Hydrogen is made by cracking it from hydrocarbons, not a green process.
  • Alternate method is to use electricity to split water, which isn't that efficient.
  • Hydrogen storage and transport is still a huge issue that lacks infrastructure.
  • The hydrogen then needs to be converted back into water to produce electricity for an electric motor
  • Hydrogen fuel cells need rare earth elements like platinum for efficiency
  • Or used in a hydrogen internal combustion motor to convert it back into water but then you need all the mechanical complexity.
  • Unlikely to be able to re-fuel with Hydrogen at home
  • Regenerative braking would also need big batteries to be effective and this is key to overall efficiency.
The comparative situation with Electricity:
  • Most electricity is made by burning fossil fuels which isn't green
  • But Hydropower, Nuclear, Wind, Solar sources are also in the mix and growing
  • Electricity storage via batteries is improving at a fast clip
  • Bottleneck could be certain rare elements but research is ongoing to eliminate or reduce reliance on them
  • Electrical transmission infrastructure already exists but may need beefing up.
  • Can re-charge batteries at home.
  • Regenerative braking is built-in.
The excess electricity generated by the Mirai’s fuel cell and by regenerative braking is stored in a lithium-ion battery. As a result, pressing the accelerator pedal yields immediate flow of electric power jointly from the fuel cell and battery to the rear-mounted AC synchronous electric motor, which drives the rear wheels through a fixed gear ratio.
 

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They need to make companies responsible to sustainably harvest Lithium. Meaning, once they are done with the site they have to leave it more or less how they found it and fill in the mines.

Also, pretty significant breakthrough announced with Solid States. That’ll be important to get fast charging speeds. Will be interesting when we have 1 MW chargers and batteries that can handle it.

 

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I came across an article that, for me, provides some context for the new EV:


With the Tercel coming out FWD in 1978, Toyota was late in adopting FWD; over 10 years later than Subaru and decades after some European brands. The Corolla and Camry were FWD abt 5 yrs later (early 80's), by which time FWD was already common in just about all midsize and smaller cars.

I think we can say that Toyota has a low bar for what they consider to be new-fangled. They don't rush into things. They will make major changes when they feel they have no choice, and never want to release product that will embarrass them with teething problems. So I'm confident their new EV will hit all the important marks, except maybe for a few minor details, that won't deter any potential buyer. The automotive press will call it boring and conventional, which Toyota actually likes bc they don't want to scare off their core buyers, who really don't want anything too exciting.

By the same token, the fact that T has been selling the Mirai to the general public for 6 years shows (showed?) that they had bet the farm on FCEV as the future propulsion system. In their view they had perfected FCEVs to the point they were willing to sell one to anybody. Plus, they were too proud of their accomplishment to keep it a secret, and wanted to be the world tech leader followed by everyone, as happened after the Prius. So I can understand their reluctance to recognize that a crash EV program was needed maybe no later than 6-8 years ago.

IMO some of the bellyaching that Toyota has done about the EV revolution is not a good look. Move on, guys. OTOH considering it must have been a crash program, the EV looks quite respectable and won't embarrass them in any significant way. T does have gigantic engineering and design resources.
 

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Car Vehicle Wheel Tire Vehicle registration plate


Spotted on Reddit near Subie HQ…

I like the black. It is usually my favorite color for Subaru and I like that it helps hide the cladding and blend it in.

Having a really hard time reasoning with this one. On one hand it will fit my needs pretty well aside from one or two days per year and significantly reduce my operating costs. On the other hand, I really like my XT. So now what, wait 5-10 years for an Outback EV, or take the plunge now…
 

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Those questions may answer themselves.
IMO I don't expect the EV to be stacked deep on dealer lots, nor do I think it will be a cheap car, even with govt sponsored rebates.. And by the time it's available, used car prices will prob come down from the stratosphere.

Trading an ICE car a few years from now all you'll hear is how people don't want ICE anymore, they want EVs.

BTW since it is now being seen on public roads undisguised, maybe it won't be too much longer before we have some ride &drive reports.
 

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They need to make companies responsible to sustainably harvest Lithium. Meaning, once they are done with the site they have to leave it more or less how they found it and fill in the mines.
+1 I am also concerned about environmental abuse.
IIRC Tesla says spent car batteries can be used in mass storage systems and I think they claim materials can be mined up to the point of current need, and then recycled indefinitely. Sounds too good to be true.
Oil exploration is not clean either, we're just more used to it.
 
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