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If the car pulls on one side even slightly on a straight highway, adjust front camber. Mine is at 0.0 on left and -0.2 on right and/or swap front two tires.
I understand that a slight pull to the right is intentional on the highway, due to road crown sloping to the right. The idea is that if a driver nods off, there car would tend to go off the road to the right, rather than into oncoming traffic.

Yes, you can overcome it with alignment, but it's not necessarily an effect to overcome.
 

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Hey all, the link to the pictures/instruction is not working anymore. Does anybody still have them? If so, it would be amazing if they could be PMed to me! . Thanks a lot
 

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Hey all, the link to the pictures/instruction is not working anymore. Does anybody still have them? If so, it would be amazing if they could be PMed to me! . Thanks a lot
Which pictures? Can you let us know which post # you are referring to?
 

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There is a link posted at post #1268. The same link was also posted earlier in the thread by DieselOx. I pmed him but maybe he is not around anymore.
 

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There is a link posted at post #1268. The same link was also posted earlier in the thread by DieselOx. I pmed him but maybe he is not around anymore.
Ahh, OK. Looks like he linked to an online photo album that isn't there anymore. That post is 5 yrs old.

DieselOx was last online Nov '18.
 

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Hello all,

Maybe not all who wander are lost.

I have a 2013 OB 3.6R and a 2018 Impreza Sport. Ever since my first drive over 30 minutes in the Outback, I was concerned because in my experience of the last 3 decades or so, the thing I've I've come to consider the hallmark of quality and utility is highway tracking. This is how easy and relaxed the driving becomes on anything over 20 minutes or so on the highway, and varies greatly in different models and individual cars. (I realized this when I got a stellar 1998 Toyota Avalon when they first came out. Noticed it for the next 20 years.)

My OB drifts around at any speed over 40 mph more than a high quality car should since perhaps the 80s. It does come back to center when releasing the wheel in curve, one definition of the issue proposed, probably only related to the #6 sub-issue below. Today I took a stiff plastic card with text on it, and measured the inner and outer tread depth- found real but small variation only on the left front, back and left front are identical. If you have this issue, cut to the chase and make this measurement. My local alignment and brakes shop will measure on a laser computer system shortly to confirm.

I've read through the first 25 pages of the 69 in this thread and others and thought it might be worth summarizing for those in 2020 who come into possesion of a 'wanderer', a confirmed subspecies of the Outback, at least.

First, there are quite a few different issues that lead to the same 'drifiting' or vague steering that so many find at an unacceptable level here. This creates a lot of red herrings and confusion for those that simply have a car that likely came from the factory with poor alignment, yet "within spec". An issue of this size (read the forums) becomes a bit ridiculous when you think that a percision laser guided computer alignment is at most $100 and people pay $20-$30,000 for the car. Much of that appears to be people arguing with dealers trying to save a few bucks because they are suddenly in that position the day you drive off the lot.

Starting from the most minor to the most significant among issues the lead to owner reports here, one finds:

1. AWD/4W drive cars don't track or steer straight well, or not as good as other modern quality cars. Not an '18 imprezza, for example (different design all around indeed, but also a 4x4)
2. Tire pressure. Dealers widely reported pumping up to 40psi to avoid storage issues or cover the problem by offering a '32 lbs' resolution. Ridiculous red herring here.
3. Many people don't appreciate good tracking, don't even notice it (my wife, for example). Constant steering always part of their driving experience.
4. 'Goes away' with mileage. Delays/denies it, allowing owner satisfaction needed on a recent big purchase, most likely people can get used to poor tracking, (I was getting to that point after about 2+ years as it was mainly my wife's car and she didn't care.)
5. Wind sensitivity in design, or "it's and SUV". This is real, but really no more than a distractor on the real issue, as obscures the alignment problem and exacerbates it. (Rear sway bar 18" or 19" upgrades widely seen to improve that directly.)
6. It's all about the choice of tires. (Or maybe failure to rotate tires). Really, only on this type of car, that creates this issue?
Now onto the rather significant:
7.
Steering issue recalls in 2010 and 2011 for shaking, replaced parts and tightened the steering drag (Drag Locknut), adding a new issue of 'heavy steering', making alignment issues more noticeable (may be ongoing contributor beyond those years, highly variable on different cars)
#8. Subaru dealer shops apparently not helping by delivering or correcting alignments of ONLY zero to positive toe on all 4 wheels, reported by the only owners to have resolved the problem as the underlying central issue.

Why on earth would something that simple be allowed to create so many unhappy current and future customers, who all really want to like the car?
(2013 alignment spec chart found re-posted below)
-SF
 

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