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'16 STi, '17 Outback
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Discussion Starter #1
After 8 months and almost 28k km of driving, I still love the OB, specially with the Yoko tires, but I'm debating already on what to replace it with.

But has anyone own both vehicles and can chime in the good and bad? I like the convenient features in the OB and the eyesight, but I feel like something's missing, I love the 4runner but wish it has the convenience features that the OB has.

So basically it'll be replace by either another OB but 3.6 this time with same option and swap over the Yokohamas, or a 4runner TRD Pro.
 

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2018 Outback 3.6R Limited
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238 Posts
I was also looking at the 4Runner TRD Pro but went with the 3.6R due to comfort, mpg, and safety features.
I did lift my OB and put bigger tires though.


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2016 subaru outback 3.6r, 2011 Subaru ForesterXt
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232 Posts
I was also looking at the 4Runner TRD Pro but went with the 3.6R due to comfort, mpg, and safety features.
I did lift my OB and put bigger tires though.


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Same here and like you, raised my 3.6r and put taller tires. They should sell a version like this because it is a whole different vehicle and much preferred, with a huge difference off road.
 

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I sold a 4runner and bought a Legacy. #1 Safety / road handling no comparison, # passenger comfort front and rear again no comparison, Cheaper to run again no comparison the Subie is cheaper, tires, fuel, parts cost. Keep in mind I bought and owned a Land Cruiser during that time and curently have a Sequoia. Both of those make the 4runner seem like s Highschool kids toy car.

I bought the Landcruiser to drag my 1800lb boat, people and gear up to Sierra Lakes in summer heat. The Subarus towed the same boat in the flat lands and winter months.

The Sequoia was bought for added seating capacity its basically the mini van.

If your not towing 1800+lbs in hot summers over mountains the Subaru is fine. If your not breaking trail and rock crawling the Subaru is superior in every way.

My Land Cruiser was driven about 3000 miles a yr we owned it 7 yrs. I sold it for what I paid for it 7 yrs earlier. Only cost to me were tires, fuel etc.

The Sequoia sees about 4000miles a yr and will probably sell for a little less than I paid for it.

Today I need one vehicle to replace two the OB and the Sequoia. If I had my way a diesel GMC Canyon would be in my driveway this minute.

Wife feels we need bus like people hauling ability though I am the kid transporter not her and Im no frigin bus driver! LOL
 

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My wifes 2016 2.5 LTD W/ Everything -and 2" Eco-hitch
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189 Posts
LOVE the looks of a 4runner - but I drive 17-20k miles a year and don't have the extra cash for gas in a 4R. I agree with the safety and comfort of the OB being way ahead. Plus, RWD / 4WD is just not what I want to deal with in Midwest winter traffic, much prefer FWD and AWD. They are WELL overdue for a redesign, its been like 9 years. 4R prices are a bit high to me, I would be temped to get a crew cab for same or less.
 

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2016 Carbide Grey 2.5 Limited Outback with Eyesight. Add-on: Geolandar GO15's on 17" WRX rims, Ecohitch
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300 Posts
Clearly the 4Runner is a beefier car that can do many things above and beyond an Outback's capacity...with a price tag to match.

One of the huge selling points of the Outback is that the ride height is almost equal to a regular sedan despite the amount of ground clearance. My parents traded down from their 4Runner to a smaller SUV because of the needing to step up into it...and that was with a running board. Outback is more older folk, women in dresses/heels, and kid friendly...which I view as a plus. But you're right, the convenience is a huge plus in the Outback column.
 

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2018 Outback 2.5i Limited, Crimson Red Pearl
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123 Posts
I had a 4Runner SR5 4WD 5MT from 1991 to 2002, then a Tacoma SR5 4WD 5MT from 2002 to 2017. I liked them. However, the gas mileage was poor for both and was on my third clutch on the 4Runner in 11 years (although never had an issue with the Taco's clutch). With the Taco at 15y/o, I elected to replace it and get my OB last September with no regrets. I still have a car that I don't feel like I fall into it when I get in.
 

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2017 Outback Limited Carbide Gray
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12 Posts
I currently have a 2008 T4R (obviously nothing close to a new TRD Pro) and a 2017 Outback Limited. I love both for what they have to offer but the daily driver is definitely the subaru. Better mpg, more comfortable, more features etc. If you are happy with the outback currently and don't find yourself needing the utility of the 4runner then I would say go for another subaru. The comfort and room of the subaru is great. I love my 4runner but the mileage isn't the best and the ride isn't nearly as nice (although I do kind of like the truck feel). Unless you are going for the looks then a highlander would be a better comparison as it has a much smoother ride and has nice creature comforts.
 

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2017 CWP Outback 3.6R
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76 Posts
We have a 2017 Outback 3.6 and a 2018 4Runner TRD Pro which just replaced a 2015 4Runner Trail Premium. The Outback gets 21 combined city/hwy, the 4Runner gets 16 combined. The Outback is much better on the highway for longer road trips due to the adaptive cruise, blind spot monitoring and quicker acceleration/less body roll. The 4Runner doesn’t have much for technology except for the 4wd multi terrain features.

If you have snow or ice in your area you have to manually shift the transfer case to 4wd. The 4Runner is better off road but the Subaru wins hands down on pavement, snow and gravel/dirt roads.

If you have a dog the extra space in the rear of the 4Runner is better as well. Also the 4Runner is much quieter inside even with A/T tires.

Highway: Outback
City: 4Runner (better on rough pavement)
Snow: Outback
Dogs: 4Runner
Technology: Outback
Stereo: 4Runner
Gas Mileage: Outback
Resale Value: 4Runner
Oil Change: Outback much easier
NVH wind noise: 4Runner




 

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'18 OB 2.5 Ltd, No Eyesight, No Nav
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2,823 Posts
After 8 months and almost 28k km of driving, I still love the OB, specially with the Yoko tires, but I'm debating already on what to replace it with.

But has anyone own both vehicles and can chime in the good and bad? I like the convenient features in the OB and the eyesight, but I feel like something's missing, I love the 4runner but wish it has the convenience features that the OB has.

So basically it'll be replace by either another OB but 3.6 this time with same option and swap over the Yokohamas, or a 4runner TRD Pro.
Did you test drive them both yet? These cars are widely different. The decision should be very easy if you know what you want.
 

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'18 Outback 3.6R Limited. '11 Forester 2.5X Prem.
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45 Posts
Agree with above post. These vehicles are very different and if you test drive, read reviews and know what you want (and know what you truly NEED), it should be an easy decision. I had a 4Runner SR5 and also a F150 SuperCrew 4x4 Lariat. The 4Runner is a great, highly maneuverable vehicle, great and nimble off road. I could put, tightly, 2 big dogs in the back. It was rock solid - until the transfer case went out < 60K miles and had to replace with salvaged one. That was a bummer and considering I took care of the 4Runner soured me on it. My F150 had teething issues during its 3 yr warranty, I had the dealer address several issues including replacing the rear hubs, radiator (for larger one that the towing package was supposed to include) and to tell you the truth the dealer was very easy to work with. After the 3 yr warranty was up, the F150 was super reliable. I drove it literally up and down the east coast, mile marker 0 all the way up, multiple times, drove it off road, on the farms, hauled a bunch of stuff, I still miss it. If you can deal with the size, and you want essentially a "truck" I'd get the F150 before the 4Runner unless you are mainly interested in spindly single track off roading. The mpg of the 4runner and F150 will start to eat you alive if you are not ready for it. Negatively against the f150 and other large vehicles is with the every increasing population, it is getting harder and harder to park them.
With 4 vehicles I had to prune and traded the F150 in on the 2018 Outback 3.6. I wanted something that was good for 80+% of the time vs. the exceptional cases. With the Outback I can comfortably commute to work, I can transport 5 people, I can put my big dog in the back, I have decent cargo capacity, I have great ground clearance and arguably best in class AWD. One of the big drawbacks of traditional 4wd vehicles is the system is not designed for normal driving in bad conditions. For instance the F150 and the 4Runner were great if you knew you were off road or stuck in some slop but were mostly useless, and in fact crappy, if you were just driving in snow or icy conditions with the rear wheel drive and the light rear end.
Now if Subaru would only get their headunits straight and sort out the RAB problems on steep hills.....
 

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'16 STi, '17 Outback
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Discussion Starter #12
We have a 2017 Outback 3.6 and a 2018 4Runner TRD Pro which just replaced a 2015 4Runner Trail Premium. The Outback gets 21 combined city/hwy, the 4Runner gets 16 combined. The Outback is much better on the highway for longer road trips due to the adaptive cruise, blind spot monitoring and quicker acceleration/less body roll. The 4Runner doesn’t have much for technology except for the 4wd multi terrain features.

If you have snow or ice in your area you have to manually shift the transfer case to 4wd. The 4Runner is better off road but the Subaru wins hands down on pavement, snow and gravel/dirt roads.

If you have a dog the extra space in the rear of the 4Runner is better as well. Also the 4Runner is much quieter inside even with A/T tires.

Highway: Outback
City: 4Runner (better on rough pavement)
Snow: Outback
Dogs: 4Runner
Technology: Outback
Stereo: 4Runner
Gas Mileage: Outback
Resale Value: 4Runner
Oil Change: Outback much easier
NVH wind noise: 4Runner




IF you can only keep one, what would it be? heart says T4R TRD Pro, logic says get another OB, I think if they had add Toyota Safety Sense on the 2018 it would be no brainer, a white TRD Pro is just so **** beautiful.

Did you test drive them both yet? These cars are widely different. The decision should be very easy if you know what you want.
I own the one I have now, so yes, I test drove both before buying, but never a TRD Pro, I don't think there's ever a TRD Pro available for test drives, kinda like STi, we had to buy the STi base on test driving the WRX, like many said, OB is nice and logical, but 4Runner TRD Pro is just so cool, it's almost Raptor-esque, but like other said, it's lacking the safety features that we've grown accustomed to.
 

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2017 Outback 2.5 Limited
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143 Posts
I just moved to Reno, NV this August and I was in the market for a new vehicle. I had my heart set on getting a truck and I was going to put a cab on it to make a camper setup. I test drove every brand truck midsize and fullsize and really liked the GMC Sierra and was very close to pulling the trigger on it. Then I started thinking about my new commute to work, 25-30 miles each way, plus I drive to the mountains every weekend mountain bike and ski. So I would average around 500-600 miles a week. Doing the math, it just didnt make sense to buy a $40k vehicle and rack up all those miles.

Then I started thinking about other options of vehicles that would be comfortable to put on miles, decent on gas and full of nice features and large enough that two people could sleep inside if needed. So I drove a 4Runner (not really great on gas and still around $40k) and it was comfy around town, but not great on the highway. Then I drove an Outback and really liked it and that's what I settled on getting. I paid $31k for the Outback and saved a ton of money on taxes, insurance, registration and gas.

Other than it being a 4 cylinder, I couldnt be happier with my decision. I've got close to 10k miles on it already and was getting 30 mpg in the summer/fall, but it seems to be dropping to 27 in the winter. Its just a great all around car with the best AWD system you can buy.

If money is not an option and you dont mind not having some features, then go with whichever car will make you more happy!
 

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2018 Outback Touring 3.6R
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I just did this, this past weekend. Thought I wanted a 4Runner and shopped at least 6 different dealers in the PNW. They ALL wanted way too much $$ for the 4Runners and were unwilling to deal. I guess they figure they don't have to in Idaho, but then again we are suffering BIG TIME from Kalifornication, and these idiots moving to Idaho will pay whatever the dealer wants..........because it's NOT california.

The 4Runner was very nice (interested in the Limited) and probably would have bought one if the numbers were right. I felt it was a bit under powered, and I really didn't like the tiny radio display. No adaptive cruise control, no Apple Play (carplay), no Lane Keeping or collision control..........not that those things are that important (I shouldn't be driving if I NEED them), but for the $$ that was going to have to spend, they better be included. The fuel mileage SUCKED.......just not worth it my opinion, plus EVERY dealer we visited or talked to was arrogant, condescending and just plain deceitful. I would rather spend my money elsewhere.

The Subaru dealer was a completely different story. Extremely helpful, respectful and willing to make a fair deal. Gave us $2000 more than what the Toyota dealers were going to give for our trade, plus sold us a Outback Touring 3.6 below invoice.........and 0% financing! The Subaru was much more comfortable (wife has always felt safer on snowy roads in the subie) and more get-up-and-go than the Toyota. Better gas mileage as well. Glad we went with the Subaru.
 

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4 runners are great! A friend has been driving a 2wd model for about 10 years with very little issue. If you want to do rock crawling it has a clear advantage over the outbacks / foresters.
 

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2017 Outback 3.6R
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68 Posts
If you do end up with a 4Runner, find one with KDSS. After driving one with and one without back to back a couple times, I could never have settled on one without. I got rid of my KDSS Trail 4Runner for a 3.6 Outback and don't miss it a bit. The 4Runner should have a V8 option. The only way to get that is to buy a Land Cruiser and I'm not willing to pay twice the 4Runner's price to have a proper engine. That's just my two cents.
 

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2005 Outback 3.0R VDC/VTD/LSD 5eat , 2.8'' lift
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1,690 Posts
you can make this from 4runner


this from outback


for city driving outback but for something more offroad or longer trips with more stuff in car no questions 4runner
 

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2005 XT, Mildly Modified...2006 XT Limited, Highly Modifed
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16,120 Posts
Except that one of these vehicles will break far more often when the are Not on the street.

Off Road Trinity Folks ...

Jeep the Father
Rover is the Son
Yota the Holy Ghost

No Subaru there ...

Not even this one ...


The greasy wheels really complicated things....
 

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2000 Outback, 6" Lift - FOR SALE; 2017 Forester XT; 2017 Outback 3.6R
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38 Posts
I actually had a 2017 Cement 4Runner TRD Pro on order before I pulled the plug and went to my 2017 3.6R. I still keep my eyes peeled on any deals on TRD Pro 4Runner but I have come to an ultimatum that my girlfriend actually provided me with (She is a former TRD Pro Tundra owner turned Forester XT owner). She brought up the great point of I have my 3.6R now as well as a lifted 2000 Outback. She said that if I am to make the change to Toyota, make the right move and just get the Land Cruiser, and I agree with her 100%



Also..

If you do end up with a 4Runner, find one with KDSS. After driving one with and one without back to back a couple times, I could never have settled on one without.
This is true.. it does give you a completely different ON ROAD ride experience, BUT if you are planning to do any off-roading, the KDSS becomes an issue when it comes to lift kits and longer travel suspension. I walked away from a gorgeous Black/Black 2017 4Runner TRD Offroad because it had KDSS. (also the sales person didn't think I was a serious buyer, but you can always change sales persons)
 

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2017 Outback 3.6R
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68 Posts
IF you can only keep one, what would it be? heart says T4R TRD Pro, logic says get another OB, I think if they had add Toyota Safety Sense on the 2018 it would be no brainer, a white TRD Pro is just so **** beautiful.



I own the one I have now, so yes, I test drove both before buying, but never a TRD Pro, I don't think there's ever a TRD Pro available for test drives, kinda like STi, we had to buy the STi base on test driving the WRX, like many said, OB is nice and logical, but 4Runner TRD Pro is just so cool, it's almost Raptor-esque, but like other said, it's lacking the safety features that we've grown accustomed to.
You can't get KDSS with the TRD Pro. Do what I did and get the Trail Edition with KDSS and swap in the TRD Pro parts. I had the only red TRD Pro around :grin2:
 
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