Subaru Outback Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,
I got an Onyx XT about 9 months ago. I'm quite happy with it and it has done everything I've asked of it on and off-road. But, when I carry a couple of mountain bikes on a trailer hitch, plus a large box of camping and recovery gear on the roof, and load the cargo area with tools, water, and camping gear for extended trips in remote places... the suspension is sagging quite a bit. Given that I'm taking it on some trails that push its ground clearance to the limit, I'm asking for suggestions on what I can do to eliminate or improve the sagging problem.
I've looked into lift kits and so forth, but since the car is still like-new, I'm really not wanting to lift it; rather just firm up the way it carries a heavy load. I would appreciate it if the group members could discuss what my options might be and point out some specific solutions.
Thanks, ThomasW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Saggy butt spacers or stiffer rear springs.
Thanks Brucey. I did a google search using your terminology and came up with several companies (Gorilla, etc.)
Would you recommend one specific brand or product over another? If not, I'll start reading through their offerings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Brucey. I did a google search using your terminology and came up with several companies (Gorilla, etc.)
Would you recommend one specific brand or product over another? If not, I'll start reading through their offerings.
So far, I have only found parts for older model Outbacks :-(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,278 Posts
So far, I have only found parts for older model Outbacks :-(
You can get a mild lift with stiffer springs here:


Or just stiffer rear springs here:

 

·
Registered
2020 Outback XT Limited-Ice Silver
Joined
·
20 Posts
I installed the Primitive Racing lift kit that gave my 2020 Limited XT, a bump in ground clearance (1.5"). But more significantly, the new King Springs are progressive. I personally did not feel that the ride is stiffer when driving it alone. However, the new springs let me carry more weight without any sag. I was very impressed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,743 Posts
Why do people buy an Outback, when they actually need a Toyota 4 Runner or some other more suited vehicle for their needs?
Have to agree. One either bought the wrong vehicle or is taking way too much stuff.
 

·
Registered
2020 Outback Touring XT / Nappa brown interior
Joined
·
169 Posts
My wife was speaking with me about this the other day. Told her if I’m going off road I’ll take our lifted truck paired with heavy duty suspension and full skid plates as opposed to her stock Touring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,278 Posts
The outback's beauty is that it's a jack of all trades. Does fine on or off the road, in all weather and most terrain. It's relatively refined, quiet, safe, and comfortable, for a vehicle that can go mild off-road/soft-roading, and not overpriced, and reasonably reliable and inexpensive to fix.

As a jack of all trades, the Outback has soft springs and weak sway bars so that it handles uneven terrain better, but since most people don't drive the thing full of cargo, the springs are tuned for mostly unladen use, unlike a pickup truck that is optimized for having a load. This is true for most SUV's since they're primarily used like minivans instead of Wranglers. If someone happens to use the car mostly with a high load, it's totally reasonable to get heavier duty springs and shocks.

There is no single vehicle that is perfect in every way, nor do buyers of a particular vehicle use it all the same way.

Even if one gets a Toyota 4-Runner it's not as if you get the perfect heavy duty suspension for every use case. There's a huge aftermarket for modifying the suspension on that vehicle, as well as Jeeps, Trucks, etc.


It comes down to physics. Stiffer springs may not increase the Gross vehicle load rating because it could be limited by the brakes, tires, and other parts of the vehicle, but it can prevent sag and make the car handle better for a given load.

Why are people being given grief/criticism for merely trying to optimize their vehicle for their use case? It's not as if the OP is trying to turn the thing into a rock-crawler where you need true 4WD with a lo-range transfer case.
 

·
Registered
2018 Outback Premium 2.5
Joined
·
368 Posts
Don't they make air bags that you can inflate when the vehicle is loaded?

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
The outback's beauty is that it's a jack of all trades. Does fine on or off the road, in all weather and most terrain. It's relatively refined, quiet, safe, and comfortable, for a vehicle that can go mild off-road/soft-roading, ... If someone happens to use the car mostly with a high load, it's totally reasonable to get heavier duty springs and shocks.
There is no single vehicle that is perfect in every way, nor do buyers of a particular vehicle use it all the same way.
As the person who asked the original question, thanks for all the comments. But, I just wanted to say that SilverOnyx seems to understand my situation perfectly. I actually considered several vehicles, including the 4-runner, before deciding that the Subaru was a better fit my purposes. Most of my driving is not with a heavy load (primarily day trips or overnight trips with the mountain bike or kayak). Even when I do extended trips and carry both (multi-destination trips of two weeks or longer), most of the driving (80-90%) is on paved or maintained roads just getting to the forest road or trail which leads to my targets.
So as I said, the Subaru is doing everything I ask of it. I simply wanted to get rid of some sag when I load everything and go out for extended periods. Sure, I could drag a small trailer like the overlanders do, but that to me would be more hassle than it's worth. Thanks Boyer66 for your comments on the Primitive Racing lift; I'm considering it.
By the way, in the 9 months that I have owned the car, I have also made two cross-country trips on the interstates. I'm not exaggerating when I say that I averaged over 85 mph for most of these journeys (love the XT and it's adaptive cruise control), and even cruising for quite some time at 90, I still averaged 26 mph (I slow down when I hit the Arizona and New Mexico borders :)).
 

·
Registered
2020 Outback Limited XT
Joined
·
49 Posts
By the way, in the 9 months that I have owned the car, I have also made two cross-country trips on the interstates. I'm not exaggerating when I say that I averaged over 85 mph for most of these journeys (love the XT and it's adaptive cruise control), and even cruising for quite some time at 90, I still averaged 26 mph (I slow down when I hit the Arizona and New Mexico borders :)).
There are areas of New Mexico where I have no issue cruising at 85-90 mph. Granted I have heard of some stories of people getting pulled over in certain areas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,278 Posts
So as I said, the Subaru is doing everything I ask of it. I simply wanted to get rid of some sag when I load everything and go out for extended periods.
I thought that there were stock height king springs available for the 2020 without a lift, but I couldn't find it. You could contact King Springs directly to find out if they're going to make them available. They do have them for the 2019 and older.


When you have uprated springs it's optimal to also get uprated shocks, but those are not available as far as I am aware. Since changing shocks and springs at the same time are almost the same labor as changing springs alone, you could wait to see if shocks become available. I've requested Bilstein to make these available but until the gen 6 is world-wide it's doubtful.

 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top