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'18 3.6R Touring
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27 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Smaller than my regular size coffee cup. I'm surprised that this filters the 6.9 quarts in my 3.6R! Which filter should I use for my first oil change?


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OBW H6 VDC, Tribeca, XT6
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12,390 Posts
It's a safety feature - less exposed area for damage. LMAO.

go with OEM

but it doesn't matter, one one is making - or not making - 400,000 miles because of filter choices. most filters aren't even remotely close to being "clogged" when changed anyway so even if it was smaller in filtering capacity than some prior iteration it wouldn't matter.
 

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Premium Member
2016 Outback Premium 2.5 CVT w/EyeSight+SRVD
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7,249 Posts
Believe it or not, Subaru knows more about their engines than we do. Really! If changed according to schedule, the OE filter is big enough to do the job.
 

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2016 Outback Premium 2.5, Ice Silver
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891 Posts
Whew,,,, I have got to say that after those first few responses I'm starting to feel a little better!:smile2:
 

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2016 3.6 Limited with ES
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2,783 Posts
Use the black one and don't use the other one.

The Subie filter is not special but it's better than Purolator but the black one isn't better than a Fram Ultra or M1.
 

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2018 2.5i Premium
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83 Posts
I would stick with the OEM black or blue because it has the correct 23 psi bypass. The only aftermarket filter that meets the 23 psi bypass is the Wix/Napa Gold 57712.
 

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'18 Outback Touring 3.6R, '11 Legacy 3.6R Limited. '11 WRX not stock
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470 Posts
I'm staying with the OEM Blacks which are used on both of our 3.6's. Buy them online in bulk and save $ :smile2: $
 

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I would stick with the OEM black or blue because it has the correct 23 psi bypass. The only aftermarket filter that meets the 23 psi bypass is the Wix/Napa Gold 57712.
Is a 57712 the right filter for a 3.6? I thought it was only for the EJ 4 cylinder engines, that last was in an outback in 2012. Also, the Wix 57712 and the blue filter are made by the same company but are different applications and lines.
 

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2017 Outback Limited 2.5, Twilight Blue/Ivory, Eyesight. Also 1995 BMW 525i with 240,000 miles
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2,332 Posts
My dealer uses a blue Subaru branded filter on 2.5i OB.
 

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2018 2.5i Premium
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83 Posts
Is a 57712 the right filter for a 3.6? I thought it was only for the EJ 4 cylinder engines, that last was in an outback in 2012. Also, the Wix 57712 and the blue filter are made by the same company but are different applications and lines.
The 57712 isn't for the 3.6 and I should of stated that. The blue USA filters are made by Honeywell (Fram) to Subaru specs. It's pretty much a Fram Tough guard with a upgraded 23 psi bypass.
 

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855 Posts
In the old days, filters were much larger but car manufacturers used to specify changing it "every other oil change". So, it only is used half as long now. And with 6.9 qt I'm surprised the interval is not longer, but I'll go along with OEM recommendations.
By the way, the Boxster in that pic to the left takes 9.5 qts for a 2.7 L 6 cyl engine. Specifies synthetic oil. If a dealer changes it, you need a loan to pay the bill!!!!
 

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2016 Outback Premium 2.5 CVT w/EyeSight+SRVD
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7,249 Posts
If a [Porsche] dealer changes it, you need a loan to pay the bill!!!!
Yea, verily! I nearly choked the first time my technically-challenged brother told me he was paying the dealer $350 per visit for just a routine oil and filter change in his Boxster. I clearly remember that my '69 911S was 10 years old (~100,000 miles) the first time I ever paid anyone to change the oil in it. Different strokes, I guess.
 

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'18 OB 2.5 Ltd, No Eyesight, No Nav
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After further thought, I will be using the OEM filter during the warranty period. On the 2.5i, the filter is right in your face as soon as you open the hood.
 

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2016 2.5i Limited, 2013 Tesla Model S 85
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1,086 Posts
No need for a large oil filter if the combination of oil and engine do not create large quantities of crud.

The bypass valve only applies when filter is blocked. Perhaps on very cold starts but the bypass is engaged then accumulated crud which is only blocked by filter not embedded in filter is provided a route back in to the engine. So the higher the pressure the less likely this will occur.

But it’s not just the valve, the filter media must be strong enough to withstand this pressure.
 

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2016 3.6 Limited with ES
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2,783 Posts
No need for a large oil filter if the combination of oil and engine do not create large quantities of crud.

The bypass valve only applies when filter is blocked. Perhaps on very cold starts but the bypass is engaged then accumulated crud which is only blocked by filter not embedded in filter is provided a route back in to the engine. So the higher the pressure the less likely this will occur.

But it’s not just the valve, the filter media must be strong enough to withstand this pressure.
What you're hinting at is the pressure differential and that is the only thing that matters when discussing the bypass setting.

Here's a really big hint for the viewers out in TV Land - if Subie had speced a better filtration media the bypass setting wouldn't have to be so high. I'm amazed that people think the 23 psi value is a design feature when it's more like an acknowledgement of a less than modern filter.

This stuff isn't that hard.
 
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