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2019 Outback Premium
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

I just bought a new 2019 Outback premium, I like the car but I hate the rims. I have 3 options in mind:

1- Plastidip the rims into black (not sure about durability), I saw some outbacks with black rims on youtube and kinda like the look.

2- Inexpensive aftermarket 17" rims. What extra work that needs to be done if I go that route? What would be the total cost? Pro/cons? I read somewhere that OEM rims are better than most aftermarket ones because they are sturdier /durable / safer (forged with cast aluminum..etc)

3- Limited's 18" wheels and rims. That would cost much more up front than the 2 options above but I could off set some of the cost by selling the 17" wheels?

Option 1 is easy and cheapest but winter may not be the best time to do plastidip and it is not easy to completely remove all of the residue if I don't like the final look.

I need your opinions to help me decide. Any inputs are greatly appreciated! 0:)
 

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5,106 Posts
Hi everyone,

I just bought a new 2019 Outback premium, I like the car but I hate the rims. I have 3 options in mind:

1- Plastidip the rims into black (not sure about durability), I saw some outbacks with black rims on youtube and kinda like the look.

2- Inexpensive aftermarket 17" rims. What extra work that needs to be done if I go that route? What would be the total cost? Pro/cons? I read somewhere that OEM rims are better than most aftermarket ones because they are sturdier /durable / safer (forged with cast aluminum..etc)

3- Limited's 18" wheels and rims. That would cost much more up front than the 2 options above but I could off set some of the cost by selling the 17" wheels?

Option 1 is easy and cheapest but winter may not be the best time to do plastidip and it is not easy to completely remove all of the residue if I don't like the final look.

I need your opinions to help me decide. Any inputs are greatly appreciated! 0:)
You have several other options with your factory wheels. Vinyl wrap, hydro dip or powder coat.
 

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Brucey
'17 3.6 Limited
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10,336 Posts
Do not plastidip.

Just get a set of used 18" wheels here.

With tires and tpms they go for 700-800.

Do not plastidip.

It looks awful after a few months of weather.
 

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Do not plastidip.

Just get a set of used 18" wheels here.

With tires and tpms they go for 700-800.

Do not plastidip.

It looks awful after a few months of weather.
Pretty easy to remove and redo.
 

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215 Posts
Do not plastidip.

Just get a set of used 18" wheels here.

With tires and tpms they go for 700-800.

Do not plastidip.

It looks awful after a few months of weather.
I've done it for winter rims because I didn't get a chance to paint them before I had to put them on.

Brucey is right but with care you can keep them looking "OK" for a while. I have to use a spray wash and control the pressure as not to remove any spots.
BTW I used more cans than that "Fonzi' dude on YouTube suggested. What a waste of money

As soon I can remove the rims I'm going to remove the Dip and spray paint them.
You can always repaint them.
 

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2014 Outback 2.5i Manual
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110 Posts
1. Never plastidip, especially on a brand new vehicle. Plastidip is a very temporary solution for people who are taking the cheap route or can't decide on a color. Also, plastidip will not hold up to tire changes.

2. Never buy cheap wheels. You'd be better off with plastidip...

3. Wheels can greatly change the appearance of a car. When it comes to modifications, do what you like and what you think looks best. If everyone was seeking the internet's suggestions and approval, all our cars would look the same. If the Premium 18s are what you ultimately want and think look best, take the time to save up for what you really want. Do it right the first time. :)

But if your heart is set on black and you like the style of your current wheels, spray on Appliance Epoxy is the way to go. A few coats out of the can will leave you with a smooth and glossy finish that requires no primer or clear coat. It'll hold up to extreme temperatures (which you'll never get with an Outback, I'm referencing very hot brakes coming off the race track) and should hold up through the most careless tire changes. I spent $6 on two cans of paint for four wheels and it has held up for years. I've done both matte grey, gloss black, and gloss white on past wheels and roll cages. Regular wheel paint does not hold up like this stuff. It's often referred to as the poor man's powder coating.









 

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I couldn't disagree more with everyone bashing on Plastidip. I think it's a great solution that holds up really well and if you don't like it, peel it off and you're out about $10 to do all four rims. I've Plastidipped the wheels on my daily driver and it's held up for three years without problems. I've also had new tires put on wheels with Plastidip. It messed up a little in a couple places where rim meets tire, but you get new tires every few years and it's as easy to fix as holding a piece of paper over the tire and touching up the blemish. Not sure why you shoud "Never plastidip, especially on a brand new vehicle" ^^^^^ age has nothing to do with it. I did mine within a few weeks of bringing it home. Plastidip is a great option and cheap. It's a great place to start and then you can upgrade to something else if you don't like it.
 

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2014 Outback 2.5i Manual
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but you get new tires every few years and it's as easy to fix as holding a piece of paper over the tire and touching up the blemish.
Some of us go through 5-6 sets of tires a year... Plus I wouldn't say "fixing" messed up plastidip is that easy. Unless you use a plastidip repair kit, you'll see the variance in layer thickness.

Not sure why you shoud "Never plastidip, especially on a brand new vehicle" ^^^^^ age has nothing to do with it.
I only say this for personal preference. In my opinion, plastidip looks cheap and can be spotted a mile away, just like those home depot garage door gasket lips the people tape on. It's a great way to cover up old wheels with curb rash or for a fun color change on a winter wheel setup. But it'd be a shame to cover up brand new wheels and do something that looks cheap on a brand new car.

But as I said above, modify your car to your taste and don't seek the advice of the internet! OP asked for opinions and we both shared ours. :)
Admittedly, they look great on your car! Black really compliments the black headlights of the 5th gen. But if you're sold on black, for the same price, you could get a more permanent and better finish with appliance epoxy. So that's where I stand.
 

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Some of us go through 5-6 sets of tires a year... Plus I wouldn't say "fixing" messed up plastidip is that easy. Unless you use a plastidip repair kit, you'll see the variance in layer thickness.


I only say this for personal preference. In my opinion, plastidip looks cheap and can be spotted a mile away, just like those home depot garage door gasket lips the people tape on. It's a great way to cover up old wheels with curb rash or for a fun color change on a winter wheel setup. But it'd be a shame to cover up brand new wheels and do something that looks cheap on a brand new car.

But as I said above, modify your car to your taste and don't seek the advice of the internet! OP asked for opinions and we both shared ours. :)
Admittedly, they look great on your car! Black really compliments the black headlights of the 5th gen. But if you're sold on black, for the same price, you could get a more permanent and better finish with appliance epoxy. So that's where I stand.
The issue with appliance epoxy is you can't easily change your mind if you decide you aren't sold on the look. Plastidip offers that opportunity.
 

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It easy to spot PlaastiDip but I've seen it look good from a distance then close up not so much. IMO if they engineered it to look better and last longer sales would suffer. Perhaps it's exactly how it's suppose to be

Kudos if you can make it look good.
 

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2014 Outback 2.5i Manual
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The issue with appliance epoxy is you can't easily change your mind if you decide you aren't sold on the look. Plastidip offers that opportunity.
Valid point. But considering that two of the OP's options are to buy new wheels, that's just as "permanent" of a modification.
 

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2018 Limited 2.5i
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475 Posts
I wouldn’t plastidip, the upkeep will make you regret it especially on a set of rims. Plus you leave it on long enough, removing it will become a pain in the ass- used to laugh everytime my brother would pull his rims and try touching them up.

I’d vote on a set of used 18s or look into a set of WRX 17s or 18s. They come with tires usually, for around $600 or so. You’d just have to have your TPMS sensors swapped to those or buy new sensors. I was looking to replace my limited 18s after slightly curbing one of them- but a replacement is going to cost me $150 so I’ll keep them. But I have been looking on FB and craigslist at possible replacements and any ‘14+ WRX wheel will fit your OB
 

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OP, I'll most likely have a set of 18" limited wheels from a 2015 in a few months if you don't do anything by then. Looking to get new wheels in early spring. Obviously don't wait for me but I'll check in then to see if you're still interested.
 

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2019 Outback Premium
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Discussion Starter #17
Wow, thanks everyone for the valuable inputs. After reading all of your comments, I think I will skip the plastidip. Hydro dip and powder coat are a little expensive to use on the rims that I'm not a fan of. The appliance epoxy is a great option but I'm not 100% set on black rims. I think I will save / wait until I find a set of 18" limited wheels.

I don't know much about rims and wheels so if I get new rims or wheels, how to know if a rim or tire will fit my car? For example, I liked the look of the 2017 Forester 17" rims, would they fit in my OB Premium and can I keep the original tires?

Would 18" rims/wheels make the ride noticeably harsher?

Which place should I go to swap tire / rims, subaru dealership or any auto/tire shop? How much would it cost?

This is the first time I wanted to do something to a car so your opinions and advice are very welcome and appreciated!

Just a pic of my new OB, I wish I didn't dislike the rims that much lol



OP, I'll most likely have a set of 18" limited wheels from a 2015 in a few months if you don't do anything by then. Looking to get new wheels in early spring. Obviously don't wait for me but I'll check in then to see if you're still interested.
Yes please send me a PM when you have that set.
 

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2014 Outback 2.5i Manual
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First, a little pet peeve of mine... "Wheels" are what your tires mount to and what bolt to the hubs of your car. "Rims" are the outer band of a wheel (literally the rim) and is only a separate component to a wheel when dealing with multi-piece wheels.

There are multiple things to consider when buying wheels:

1. Bolt pattern, I believe the 2019 has a bolt pattern of 5x114.3, which is different from the 5x100 that Subaru was using for the longest time. So be mindful of that when shopping.

2. Center bore, the 2019 should be 56.1mm. You can buy wheels with a larger center bore and use hub rings that center the wheel to the hub, but if your new wheels have a smaller center bore, you'll need to bore out the wheels further.

3. Width and offset, the factory 7" wide wheels are ET55. That's how many milimeters the mounting face of the wheel resides from the center point (3.5" on a 7" wheel). People usually like to go a bit more aggressive with aftermarket wheels and make them more flush with the fenders of the car. In this case, you'd want a smaller offset. The main thing is to make sure that you still have sufficient clearance from the strut bodies. https://www.willtheyfit.com/ is a great calculator for determining how the new setup will look.

If you go from 17" wheels to 17" wheels, with about the same width, then you can keep your current tires. Keep in mind that many tire shops will refuse to mount used tires for liability reasons, so you might need to shop around for a mom and pop shop that will do this. Also keep in mind that your new wheels need to have TMPS or have the TPMS from your current wheels transferred over.

When shopping for tires, there are many options you can go with. But for these cars, I'd just advise keeping an overall wheel/tire diameter as close to stock as possible. Factory 17" wheels use a 225/65/17, factory 18" wheels use a 225/60/18. But if you get a wider wheel or just want more rubber on the road, a 245/60/17 is almost the same size as the 225/65/17 in diameter, so it's a solid choice. Again, pay attention to wheel offset, tire width, and clearance of the strut body. Tire width is also dependent upon wheel width. You don't want a wide tire bulging on a narrow wheel, but you also don't want a narrow tire stretched onto a wide wheel.

Going with a larger wheel size will make the ride harsher because you're loosing the amount of sidewall you have on the tires. However, it will be barely noticeable with the size of tires on these cars. Technically, you'll also have more weight. But your handling will be improved as the tire flexes less in hard turns. Most people won't notice these changes and considering that 18" wheels are a factory option from Subaru, it won't be greatly sacrificing ride quality. Going with a 19" or 20" wheel would make a more noticeable difference.

The average going rate for mounting and balancing a tire on a wheel is $25-30 each. It doesn't really matter where this is done, but make sure the shop is trusted and has a well calibrated balancing machine. As mentioned above, if you're swapping your current tires over to new wheels, then you'll need to find a shop that is willing to mount used tires. Most of the well known tire chain stores will not do this, but some dealers will!
 

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2014 Outback 2.5i Manual
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For what it's worth, a 2017 Forester has a bolt pattern of 5x100, so this would not fit on your 2019 Outback without adapters.

Adapters can be used to mount different bolt pattern wheels, but people will forever debate on the safety of these.
Like spacers, adapters will move your wheels further from the hub. In the very long term, this can cause additional stress on wheel bearings, but not any more than an aggressive offset wheel would cause.

We've run spacers on race cars to widen the track and would never consider this a problem. But everyone has different viewpoints on the matter, so it's not worth the debate. The real "danger" is that you have an additional component that must be torqued to spec, meaning another point for failure.

The other risk would be buying cheap spacers or adapters that aren't hubcentric. Like cheap aftermarket wheels, it's just not wise to skimp when it comes to what connects your car to the road.
 

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Wow, thanks everyone for the valuable inputs. After reading all of your comments, I think I will skip the plastidip. Hydro dip and powder coat are a little expensive to use on the rims that I'm not a fan of. The appliance epoxy is a great option but I'm not 100% set on black rims. I think I will save / wait until I find a set of 18" limited wheels.

I don't know much about rims and wheels so if I get new rims or wheels, how to know if a rim or tire will fit my car? For example, I liked the look of the 2017 Forester 17" rims, would they fit in my OB Premium and can I keep the original tires?

Would 18" rims/wheels make the ride noticeably harsher?

Which place should I go to swap tire / rims, subaru dealership or any auto/tire shop? How much would it cost?

This is the first time I wanted to do something to a car so your opinions and advice are very welcome and appreciated!

Just a pic of my new OB, I wish I didn't dislike the rims that much lol





Yes please send me a PM when you have that set.
Do you have plans for all terrain or more aggressive tires? If not your best bet is to find some 18 inch takeoffs that already have tires mounted. Personally I think A/T tires are worth the upgrade, but if it's not a priority for you you wouldn't have to worry about fitment, shopping for tires or having extra mounting and balancing fees.
 
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