Subaru Outback Forums banner

21 - 36 of 36 Posts

·
On the Super Mod Squad
2002 Pair: 3.0 VDC Wag & 2.5 Limited Sedan
Joined
·
25,802 Posts
yeah, I fixed the first post to read "2.5" liter, found in 2002.

although the antique XT6 2.7 was great.
 

·
Registered
Outback 2011 3.6R Premium
Joined
·
1,044 Posts
Two things to consider.

1. Have you removed the hoses from the heater unit and run the garden hose through it to attempt to clean out any gunk from the heater core? This may resolve the heater problem.

2. Do you think the engine is almost overheating or could it be that the temperature gauge is reading high?

Moving on, If you have most of the air out of the system replace the radiator cap (as you have done) and let it cool down. Once cool, remove the radiator cap and top up the radiator AND the overflow bottle. Go for a short, ten to twenty minute drive, watching the temp gauge, and then return home and let the engine cool down and again check the radiator and overflow bottle and top us as required. If your overheating is solved all good if not you could have a clogged radiator. Sometimes a sealant is added to the radiator to try and stop head gasket leaks and this sealant partially clogs the radiator.

Keep checking the radiator AND overflow bottle level (when cool) every day for at least a week. After a week of the level has stabilised check the level monthly.

Seagrass
 

·
Premium Member
2001 VDC/SC One of a Kind
Joined
·
12,877 Posts
Okay, here's the trick for forcing air out of the heater core - rev the engine. As the temp comes up, or in your case since it is up already, snap the throttle to 4k rpm and let it drop, then do it again after it gets down around 1k rpm. Do this until you have steady heat coming from the vents. Usually it only takes 3-4 throttle snaps. Let it run at idle and snap the throttle once in a while. A throttle snaps that does not produce air bubbles, but pushes coolant in to the funnel is when you let it idle. All of my ayst burping takes less.than 20 minutes. Then it sits.

Let it idle and make sure the heat blows consistently after the bubbles stop. When the fans come on, shut it off, leave the funnel alone and let the car cool. As it cools the level in the funnel will drop. When it gets down to where you can put your hand on the engine and it's luke warm, then put the cap on the radiator.

As for the funnel level changing while you're burping - as air comes out, the level should drop. When the bubbles cease, the level will stay steady. When the engine cools, after shut down, the level will drop more.

If you have bubbles and a rise in the funnel level, that's a problem. Air from combustion is taking the space up in the coolant system and pushing the level up in the funnel. This in an indication of a HG breach. Bubbles and an increase in STFT is a definite sign of HG breach.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,197 Posts
The fans dontvkick ok n until it's in the red, then it drops to between the halfway mark and hot. And then it goes back to the red before the fan kicks on again.
The temperature gauge is designed to remain at the normal position over the range of approx 160 F to 212 F.
2002 temp gauge.jpg

The fans should come on even before the temperature gauge needle noticeably moves away from the normal position, i.e., above 212 F. When the gauge pointer rises above normal both fans should be running at full speed.
2002 fan control.jpg

If the fans (neither) comes on before the gauge is in the red, then I'd check the temperature the ECM is working with, by using a scanner tool that can display the coolant temp when connected to the OBD port.

If the temperature is above 212 F and fans aren't being turned on, then there's a problem in the ECM. A scanner that can access the ECM ssm output data could also display the ECM control status ("Switches") of the two relays used to turn the fans on and off. When either of these is "on", the corresponding fan should be running.
2002 fan cct.jpg

FreeSSM and Romraider are two free scanner programs that can provide insights as to what the cooling fan control system is doing.
 

·
Registered
'10 3.6R Outback Limited, 2zr swapped Toyota Yaris track toy, '05 AWD Pontiac Vibe
Joined
·
397 Posts
As stated above, a good scanner or free ssm will likely help you out the most here. Before you do that thought do as others stated and give it another effort at bleeding the system properly
 

·
On the Super Mod Squad
2002 Pair: 3.0 VDC Wag & 2.5 Limited Sedan
Joined
·
25,802 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #34
I tried the burping process again this morning. I jacked it up higher and tried the tapping rpms up to 4 this morning but I had to be at work and i do deliveries for work. So, I put the dummy thermostat back in temporarily. I am going to try the YouTube thing in a bit when I get a chance. But even with the dummy in it is still running up to red then back to normal.
 

·
Registered
2000 & 2002 Outback Wagon EJ251/Auto + 2004 Outback LL Bean EZ30/Auto + 1996 Legacy Outback Wagon EJ22/5sp + 2008 Outback Wagon EJ253/Auto + 2004 Legacy Sedan 35th Anniv. EJ251/Auto (not OB) + 2005 O
Joined
·
149 Posts
My thoughts are that possibly your temperature sensor is reading backwards for some reason. Your fans cycle on and off properly, just in reverse of how they should work. I agree with the others above that you need some kind of OBDII reader to see what the car's computer is seeing. There is a cheap one available at wal-mart that will give you live data. You should be able to see the coolant temp rise as your engine warms up and check at what temperature the fans come on. BTW, If your AC is on, the fans should run all the time. You might could use it as a way to keep the fans on all the time if the car is actually running hot (and not just giving you a false indication).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #36
Hey guys! I really do appreciate all of the help and advice but I just didn't have the time between being a single parent and working. So I used it as a trade in and got a new car. Thanks again!
 
21 - 36 of 36 Posts
Top