Subaru Outback Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I'm preparing to do a timing belt mantainance in my 118k outback. Bought it used, supposedly got a new engine at 30k, but can't verify it. I want to check if I'm not missing anything.

This is what I was thinking to do:

- Replace t-belt and all idlers and the tensioner with the hydraulic assembly (the old 2-piece one).

- I'll do the water pump on this one, it has leaked at some moments too.


I'm considering if it's necessary to:

- Put new timing cover gaskets (they are pricey, 30$)

- Re-seal camshaft seal

- Re-seal the oil pump

- Re-seal front crankshaft seal

- Replace thermostat (you don't need to take the t-belt to replace, so I can wait).

Which of the things listed would you recommend to do? Am I missing something? I was also thinking to pull the spark plugs a little before opening everything to see if I have some valve gasket leak to replace it with this maintenance.

Thanks a lot!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,299 Posts
seals are tough - these newer seals are robust and not that prone to leak. but if they are leaking it's silly not to replace them now.

i'd at least have some on hand and inspect all of them and replace any that are wet at all.

i would reseal the oil pump (crank seal, oil pump oring, and sealant). tighten the rear backing plate screws while it's off. often one or a few are loose. tighten them with locktite on the screws.

Subaru thermostats rarely fail (i've never actually seen it happen) but if you do replace it be sure to buy one from Subaru or get the new Xacta or whatever it's called Stant replacement that's similar quality. Aftermarket stats are notably less robust looking and prone to issues.

timing cover gaskets - never in a million years, no point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,299 Posts
With crank seal you mean crankshaft seal? The oil pump has just one seal, right?
yes, crankshaft seal. on an EJ engine the crank seal and oil pump seal are the same thing as the crank shaft goes through the oil pump.

yes - the oil pump has:
1. one seal (the crank seal)
2. an oring
3. sealant around the casing

and tighten the backing plate screws.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Ok, I see it now on the manuals. Makes sense, thanks!

Would you buy aftermarket for the seals? I was going to buy Gates for the timing components.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
821 Posts
I'd definatly do all cam seals, there prone to be leaking.
Check under at the wrist pin access plugs, make sure they are dry or re seal.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,881 Posts
The thermostat is mounted to the base of the water pump. Get a new one.

I have run into issue with aftermarket cam and crank seals. So you only have to take it apart once, you may want to get these seals from Subaru. Aftermarket seals are slightly off and don't fit proper.

The timing cover seals keep dirt from getting in to the belt run area. Dirt/No dirt. You make the call.

The tensioner rarely fails, but if you don't have access to a press, its easier to just get a new one. Aftermarket works for this one. Don't pull that pin until everything is set and tightened.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all replies.

I need to figure out what engine there is on my car, because previous owner mentioned that the first owner had the engine replaced, so I cannot be sure about which tensioner type has (the 1 or the 2 - piece). Is there any identification in the engine I could use to track this down?

I changed the plugs this weekend. Boy it was hard on cylinder #3. I also ran a compression test, had 135, 130, 125 and 137. The spec for the 2.5l DOHC 1997 says 137-174 psi. Is my compression really bad? Should I take care of it at this moment? So far I have no oil leaks or any problems. The only sign of low compression is that my parking break button isn't working, so I use the transmission as parking break, and I can sometimes start rolling on a hill with a gear engaged, which I believe most cars won't.

Thanks a lot!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,881 Posts
Engine ID stamp is on the passenger side top of the block near the P/S pump.

Compression results depend on how you did the test. Are you using a good gauge? Were all the plugs out? Did you hold throttle at wide open while cranking? Did you crank each cylinder equal number of times? Did you watch for a leak down?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I used a O'Reillys loaner, 40$ value. Are they trustworthy?

All the plugs were out, but I misunderstood the manual with the wide open throttle, thought open was for no gas. Where should I open the throttle, by the engine or by the gas pedal? By the way, what difference does it make?

I was not meticulous with the number of times, but I guess after 3 or 4 it was up to 95% of where it was going, and after 7 it was at 100%.

I also let too much time go by between taking of the plugs and running the test, around 2-3h.

I guess I might repeat it another time, do you have any recommendations for accessing the plug on cylinder #3?

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,525 Posts
the first owner had the engine replaced, so I cannot be sure about which tensioner type has (the 1 or the 2 - piece). Is there any identification in the engine I could use to track this down?
No. Original engines from MY96 and most MY97s have the two piece. Late MY97 and all MY98 and MY99 have the one piece ... but I know of no external markings that will tell you what you have other than EJ25 ... but that's not going to tell you about the tensioner. You might be able to see the tensioner and determine which type it is by removing only the driver's side TB cover, which is pretty easy to do. Otherwise, you'll have to remove all the TB covers and look inside.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I just did what you are about to do and then some. I have a full FelPro gasket set that was opened by a shop but nothing was removed. I have no need for it if you want it ill sell it to you for cheap.

Tips:
Remove fans, battery, coolant res., intake entirely and get a good amount of different extensions/socket adapters so you can get the right length you need to remove the spark plugs. Even after doing it tons of times it still takes me 2 hours just to do plugs/ wires.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
About this Discussion
11 Replies
6 Participants
97OBLimited
Subaru Outback Forums
Welcome to the Subaru Outback Owners Forum, we have tons of information about your Subaru Outback, from a Subaru Outback Wiki to customer reviews.
Full Forum Listing
Top