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2019 Subaru Forester Premium, Crystal Black Silica, Pkg 15
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Discussion Starter #1
Well, the good news is that my 2011 is back in my hands again (I did give it a hug) after a new Torque Converter and a little bit of new CVTF following the TSB.

Everything on the car looks great, except for the rear brake pads.

I had done them at a shop in town about 3 or 4 years ago, so it's no surprise that they're do. Fronts are in good shape, though.

I haven't done this before, but I'm considering this a lifetime skill, so I've got no problem investing in tools. It's been about a year since I was able to start tackling some maintenance tasks like oil changes thanks to the good suggestions of the forum folk.

The multipoint inspection they did when the car was in the service department said the rotors are all in good condition (green, out of green-yellow-red), so I think I just want to throw a pair of pads on there. I checked the rotors myself, and there doesn't appear to be any lip or anything. They seem in great condition aside from the surface rust on the top of it.

Out of ease of use, I want to grab one of those OEM Brake Pad sets online or from the parts department.

Again, this is the first time I'm attempting this, so I'd like a few suggestions on tools or fluids and lubes that I don't have.

I believe this is the correct part number: 26696AG031

https://parts.subaru.com/p/PAD-KIT-REAR-DISK-BRAKE/49236033/26696AG031.html

But, I don't know what it does or doesn't come with.

I've heard people suggesting Sil-Glyde for the caliper pins to make sure they're clean and lubed and free. I'll also need to get a piston tool.

Here's the piston tool: Lisle 24400 Disc Brake Pad Spreader, about $9-10.

Here's the Sil-Glyde: AGS SG8 Lubricant, about $12-13.

What else? I have a pair of jackstands - that's good. But, I need a Jack. My local Costco has one from their website that seems like a smart choice - especially with the lifetime warranty they provide - so I'll probably drop about $100 on that, which is a 3-ton jack, 4" min lift, 19" max lift. I do have some HF Jack Pads for the stands. Just going to jack it from the rear differential up, and then put the stands under, and away we go.

I have a lug wrench - will be doing it by hand, at least the break-away part, and then I'll just use my cordless drill with the appropriate square adapter to remove them so I don't have to do it ALL by hand. I have a torque wrench to put them back on.

I suppose I'll have a can of Subaru Brake Fluid on hand, just in case. Not looking to change the brake fluid at this time...
 

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2017 OutBack Premier, 2019 Forester Ltd, 2016 370z Rdstr
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Pilot1226,

Consider flushing out all of that old brake fluid and replacing it with fresh. The factory recommends every 4 years, and you're 3 years past that. It may save you having a seized caliper down the road, and all of the money new pads, rotors and a caliper will cost if a seized piston does any damage.

Add new brake fluid, 2 feet of plastic hose (to fit on the bleed screws), an old water bottle to catch the old fluid, and a turkey baster (to suck out the old fluid from the master cylinder). You'll need a buddy when you get to the bleeding stage, and there are lots of YouTube videos to show you how to go about it with the buddy.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I’ve heard the local car chains have free loaner one-man bleed sets. I can look into it.
 

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Since this is a new learning experience. Start with replacing the brake pads first. Once you successfully complete that task then you can think about flushing the brake fluid.

Replacing the pads is one of the easier maintenance tasks. Not a lot of gotchas. You will spend more time gathering the tools, jacking the car, etc. than actually replacing the pads.

Flushing the fluid is also pretty easy......until one of your 7 year old bleeder screws is rusted in place and you round of the head trying to break it free. A few healthy doses of PB Blaster is a good starting point.
 
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Since this is a new learning experience. Start with replacing the brake pads first. Once you successfully complete that task then you can think about flushing the brake fluid.
......
AGREED..... Do NOT open up the hydraulic system yet. (Besides watching the resivour as you squeeze the calipers)

Only AFTER you have successfully replaced the pads and driven for awhile... then you can think about bleeding the hydraulic system. It takes a TOTALLY different set of tools and skills to bleed the hydraulic system.

Also, if your bleeder-nipples have not been opened for many years... they may give you troubles. We can give you tips and hints before you head down that road. (like use teflon tape on the bleeder-nipple threads to eliminate future problems and facitate vacuum-bleeding.)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Alright I’ll hold off on the brake fluid for now. Got all the parts in the mail already (that was fast) just waiting on Costco to deliver my floor jack and then having a go at it.

I will try to battery syringe as much brake fluid out of the master cylinder as I can after I push the pistons back in and top off with fresh.
 

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I ALWAYS make sure the bleeders open before I do anything. I NEVER retract caliper pistons without opening the bleeders. I don't want that crappy fluid going back thru the master cylinder, or other components. I've seen more than one MC ruined that way over the years I worked as a Master Tech. Why take that chance, not me.
 

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Also, get a 6-point wrench for the bleeders. If you use a 12-point on a really stuck bleeder, you have a real good chance of rounding it off.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I ALWAYS make sure the bleeders open before I do anything. I NEVER retract caliper pistons without opening the bleeders. I don't want that crappy fluid going back thru the master cylinder, or other components. I've seen more than one MC ruined that way over the years I worked as a Master Tech. Why take that chance, not me.
Yeah, I saw a YouTube video (ChrisFix?) that suggested that. I may consider it but if I have any trouble with the bleeders forget it.

Hope I’m not making a mistake with not doing the rotors but both sides have no lip and seems flush. Thickness is in check with the FSM specifications.
 

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Soak them with blaster outside and pull the caps and fill bleeder with blaster, brake fluid will flush it out. Tap on caliper next to bleeder with hammer several times. Let blaster do its magic for a while. Use a six point wrench or quarter drive socket. Try just tweaking tighter then looser. Sounds counterintuitive I know. Sometimed using the six point wrench and gently tapping with a hammer back and forth loosens them easier. Sometimes a little heat. Haven't broken a bleeder in forever. A little patience goes a long way to having success.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Might have to buy a six point. Any idea what size?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Ok, I’ll check it out with my socket set and get the proper six pointer.

Here’s a question, some confusion on my part.

I know you’re supposed to put some grease on the shims and the back of the brake pads. I have SilGlyde and CRC Disk brake quiet.

Which should I use? Looks like CRC goes on the back of the pad and sets for a few minutes before you install it. So I guess the Silglyde goes on the ears and shims ?
 

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You don't need the crc disc brake quiet. You can use the Sylglide on all contact points. Works just fine for lubricating and noise control. It's all I ever use.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
You don't need the crc disc brake quiet. You can use the Sylglide on all contact points. Works just fine for lubricating and noise control. It's all I ever use.
Great. Looking forward to it. Jack gets delivered today, probably will get to them later in the week.

Hope I'm not making a mistake by leaving the rotors on there, but they seem in good condition.

You mentioned that you open the bleeders when you compress the piston back in. Any risk of air getting back into the line when you do this?
 

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Great. Looking forward to it. Jack gets delivered today, probably will get to them later in the week.

Hope I'm not making a mistake by leaving the rotors on there, but they seem in good condition.

You mentioned that you open the bleeders when you compress the piston back in. Any risk of air getting back into the line when you do this?
As long as the rotors are within spec you should be OK by just dropping in a new set of pads.
 

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Air in caliper....not really. Your pushing fluid out of caliper. Just let it drip a little after you push piston back in. Bleeders are on top of caliper so any air will escape. Just dont let the MC reservoir go empty.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Cool. Thanks for the insight. I'm going to have a go at it over the weekend, weather permitting.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Holy crap that was harder than I expected.

The rear pads were absolutely shot. I’m glad I did them. I did have a few oh crap moments. Once I got done with one side the other one was done in a few minutes once I understood what was going on.

Done and done. Next time I think I’ll leave it to the pros. That was grueling work. ?
 
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