Subaru Outback Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
2012 Volvo S-60, 2013 Subaru Outback 2.5 base, 2017 Subaru Outback 2.5 i Limited
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Got a quote from my dealership...299 if they can cut rear rotors, 499 if they can't be cut?
I'm at 3 mm now, I guess they cut the rotor while its on the car?
Every car I have had I just replaced the rotors with the pads!
Is this typical for Subaru?
 

·
Registered
2018 3.6R Limited
Joined
·
83 Posts
I've always resurfaced rotors when I do pads. The price for the job is probably typical for a shop.
I'll have to prepare myself for the future when I can't do it myself and I see quotes like this.:confused:
 

·
Registered
2018 Outback Premium 2.5
Joined
·
162 Posts
Brakes are cheap if you are comfortable working on them yourself. Generally not difficult.
Centric premium are fantastic rotors at a great price.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2012 Volvo S-60, 2013 Subaru Outback 2.5 base, 2017 Subaru Outback 2.5 i Limited
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I know you need a special tool to release the PB and caliper...may be above ny comfort level!!
Local place where I get my tires quoted 399$ not specifying rotor source and saying premium ceramic pads,
ask if he would do OEM parts he said he would come up with a quote!
 

·
Registered
2016 2.5i Outback, 2002 Audi S4 Avant, 1980 CB750F Supersport, 1985 Carrera 3.2
Joined
·
560 Posts
I know you need a special tool to release the PB and caliper...may be above ny comfort level!!
Local place where I get my tires quoted 399$ not specifying rotor source and saying premium ceramic pads,
ask if he would do OEM parts he said he would come up with a quote!
You can rent the tool at any auto parts store for free. It's just a brake piston compressor and you match the specific adapter that fits the notches on the piston. Very easy to do.
 

·
Registered
2012 Outback Ltd 3.6r
Joined
·
404 Posts
You also don't need a piston compressor, a C-Clamp works just fine, even on the front double calipers. Just leave the inboard pad in place, and use the C-Clamp on it. I replaced pad & rotors front and back on my '12 3.6R for something like $200, might have been less. Kit came with quality ceramic pads (incl new clips/hardware), rotors, brake fluid, and a big can of brake cleaner. - Pads even had a seam of 'break in' down the center to help bed the pads quicker, and a nice cross-hatch pattern on the rotors.

I'd advise cracking the bleeder valve open when pushing the retracting the pistons, with a tube attached to prevent air entering. Then finish bleeding each line, to ensure there's no air/moisture. - We're supposed to perform a bleed or replacement of the fluid every 36 months, and what comes out is horrible, compared to what goes into the master cylinder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,881 Posts
You also don't need a piston compressor, a C-Clamp works just fine, even on the front double calipers. Just leave the inboard pad in place, and use the C-Clamp on it. I replaced pad & rotors front and back on my '12 3.6R for something like $200, might have been less. Kit came with quality ceramic pads (incl new clips/hardware), rotors, brake fluid, and a big can of brake cleaner. - Pads even had a seam of 'break in' down the center to help bed the pads quicker, and a nice cross-hatch pattern on the rotors.

I'd advise cracking the bleeder valve open when pushing the retracting the pistons, with a tube attached to prevent air entering. Then finish bleeding each line, to ensure there's no air/moisture. - We're supposed to perform a bleed or replacement of the fluid every 36 months, and what comes out is horrible, compared to what goes into the master cylinder.
cracking the bleeder screw is a good trick - some cars are easier than others to compress the rear pistons, and that helps a lot.

With a C-clamp on the Gen5 you have to be careful about the parking brake motor mounted on the back of the piston - tricky to get a clamp on there and not press on the motor body. the parking brake function uses a screw - so retracting that all the way and then compressing the piston gets you a lot of clearance. Depends on the amount the pads are worn.

I've been using some old sets of C-clamps I got from my grandfather years ago for brakes on other cars and the motorcycles... the new stuff isn't near the quality of those things!
 

·
Registered
2012 Outback Ltd 3.6r
Joined
·
404 Posts
So the 5th Gen doesn't use the cable activated drum setup, inside the rotor hub? - Haven't had one apart, and 'assumed' it was the same setup as the 4th Gen.

If you do crack the bleeders, you can also push them in by hand most of the time. I hate pushing the old nasty fluid back into the system, especially with ABS setups.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
I just replaced my rears at 88458 miles last night. The last time I had tires rotated the tire dealer said I was getting close to being worn out and he was right. I figured why wait and take a chance I already have a lot of miles and doubt Ill keep it another 89K so I went on youtube and watched this video


I bought the pads from my local Subaru dealer for $59.99 and then at AutoZone I bought a tube of caliper grease, a can of brake cleaner and a quart of brake fluid. I guess I spent about $15 on all that. Then I ordered the brake caliper winding tool off Amazon that is shown on the video above. It was $18.98

https://amzn.to/2Qhra6I

I already had brake bleeder, hose, floor jack etc. So I had 100$ total in everything I guess. Followed his suggestions pretty closely, removed the calipers, then cleaned everything very well with brake cleaner including the rotors which were perfect with no scarring, no marks of any kind. Of course the thickness was great too since there is no turning to thin them down. I dont see any reason to turn these at all and I work in a machine shop that I could have got them turned for free.

I removed the caliper carrier and using a toothbrush and brake cleaner I completely cleaned the slide pins and greased them. Since the old calipers were worn the pins will not be compressed a lot more and therefore running in an area that was previously exposed and covered with dirt and road grime so get rid of all that grime and grease the pins. I also greased the tangs of the pads where they touch the caliper rail to ensure they move freely. I was in no rush and took my time and even bleed the rear brake lines while there. To do that I removed all the old fluid from the master cylinder then put in new fluid. Then after cracking the valve I had my wife pump the brake pedal over and over with my mitivac attached to draw the old fluid out. Then refilled the master cylinder again on the other side to repeat. The fluid didn't look dark at all. But its $5.99 for a quart so why not.

Here is a photo of the pads I took out beside the new ones. 60220273869__4F21632B-8A86-470D-B987-164C29797E42.JPG

478198
 

·
Registered
2018 Outback Premium 2.5
Joined
·
162 Posts
Good practice to just do a fluid flush before you do a brake job too. Cheap, not much added time, and you don't push anything bad back into lines.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
I cracked the bleeder on mine so anything getting pushed was pushed out the bleeder. I did a full flush after anyway and pushed about 2 master cylinders full of fluid out after having drained it and filled with new fluid first.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top