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Discussion Starter #1
I tried looking for any pictures or how-to, but couldn't find anything.

My '13 might have a broken spring s-hook on the lumbar support. This afternoon, I got in, felt/heard a pop that seemed to come from inside the seatback, and noticed the lumbar springs seem weak now.

I want to take off the plastic shell that covers the seatback, but I'm not sure how it's snapped in. I can pull it back on the edges and peek inside, but I can't figure out how to pop it off without damaging it.

Any hints? Photos of what to expect would help.

Thanks.
 

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Finally got the time to remove the seatback cover tonight.

I found the same broken S-hook that others have reported.

The entire pressure of the lumbar support is anchored by a very thin piece of bent wire. Once that little hook breaks off, there's nothing holding the lumbar support to the seat frame.

I'll stop by the dealer tomorrow and check on any kind of replacement pieces, and until then I'll be looking at other solutions on this forum.

The picture of the seat internals shows a loop at the end of a tensioning cable. The hook goes through the loop on that cable, and you can see the opposite end of the hook still attached to the seat frame. That little hook has to carry a lot of force.
 

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I used keyrings and small carabiners. You can get that in any store, and no need to overpay at the dealer.
I haven't had a chance to get to the hw store yet to look at some of those ideas. The connection at the seat side has a small diameter hole in a tab that's pretty hard to get to (2013). I'm worried a small carabiner or something like that might have 2 problems - one is trying to thread it through that tab, and the other is that it might be longer than the original clip and won't allow the tension on the lumbar to get to full tension.

I saw a couple pictures of some fixes, and it looks like a couple of different ideas have been tried.

This is a lot of work for a 15 cent part.
 

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Thx. I saw those videos yesterday. The tab on his seat looks different, do he might have an OB that's a year or two older. He used a link off a hanging light fixture. Whatever gets the job done, and pretty much anything will be stronger than OEM.
 

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Thanks for the reminder. I still need to do this, but I've been too lazy since I always keep the lumbar as recessed as possible anyway. I'm sure I can find suitable materials in the old tool chest to fix this. I have a spool of galvanized steel wire that might work.
 

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2 things: my back is killing me, I really need to make the time to fix this tomorrow, and every time I mess with something inside that seat back I cut myself.
 

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Had a nice day to work in the driveway, so I went to Home Depot to pick up a few repair parts.

I got a 3-pack of quick links. I replaced the broken side, but did not replace the opposite side. I know that some people have done it pre-emptively, but I figure right now "if it ain't broke, don't fix it." If/when that side breaks I have the parts to fix it.

Note: do not wear a watch, it will get in the way when you are trying to reach the lumbar button from the back seat. It also gets in the way when reaching under the seat to unhook and reattach the elastic that holds the lower flap of the seat back panel.

Step 1: Trace the elastic band underneath the seat that connects to the lower section of the seat back panel. It helps to raise the seat up as high as it will go. It's hard to see under there, and there are some sharp edges. Be careful. See my picture of my injuries. Also, make note of where that elastic is hooked so you can put it back in the same place. Unhook the elastic.

Step 2: pull that lower flap back and you'll expose two screws. Remove those screws, then pull back towards you on the lower part to unhook the lower part of that panel. Then pull straight down.

Step 3: remove the broken piece from the seat frame. I used needle-nose pliers for their reach. There will be a plastic grommet, it just snaps in and might come out when you remove the broken clip. Mine came out with the clip.

Step 4: remove the double stick tape and save it.

Step 5: thread a quick clip through the grommet and then put it all back into the seat frame tab.

Step 6: hook then end of the cable onto the quick link and screw the nut shut. I didn't torque it down, I did it finger tight. This will be easier if you release the lumbar tension by pushing the button on the side of the seat. You'll get a lot of extra cable to work with.

Step 7: replace the double-stick tape. This tape and the grommet prevent metal-to-metal contact and minimize rattles.

Step 8: replace the seat back and screws.

Step 9: Re connect the elastic underneath the seat. This is harder than you'd think and where where I cut myself a couple times without realizing it.

Total cost: $4.17 in parts, plus two bandages.

Total time: (?) not sure. Maybe 15 minutes total to remove/replace the seat back. Maybe another 15 minutes to make the repairs.

Edit:

I noticed the pix are in reverse order.
 

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