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Discussion Starter #1
New to the gen 3 outback, new to the forum! Bought an 06 ob xt with 106,000.
Having 105 mile service done next week. Purchased a Gate timing kit from FCP which includes the water pump. After reading on here about the OEM water pump, I M wondering if it is better to replace with the gates WP or leave the stock OEM one alone? With the Stock go for another 100 K? I am planning on having this car for a while and want to do things right for reliability on this car. Planning on doing all the pully's, seals, etc while they are in there as well.
Thanks for your time and knowledge!
 

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2017 OutBack Premier, 2019 Forester Ltd, 2016 370z Rdstr
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My dealership service rep told me a long time ago (I can't recall if I owned my 2004 or my 2007 OBW at the time) that they usually didn't change out the water pump with the first timing belt change, but did at the second.

In your case you've already purchased one, and you've stated that you want reliability over the long term. After all, to change out just the water pump down the road requires that you do almost a complete timing belt change, but don't change the belt. It requires just as much work. So replace it.

As for OEM versus aftermarket waterpumps, I'm not sure it would make any difference, although the dealership will obviously tell you otherwise. Good Luck!
 

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Car: 2008 Tribeca, 2010 LGT, Sold: 2005 XT Limited
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You paid for it, might as well do it now. Are you doing it yourself? If you didn't have it and you were doing it yourself, my advice would be to not do the water pump. I would guess it's almost as likely to fail as you are to have problems from the new install.

Tom
 

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2006 Outback Wagon 2.5i 5spd MT Atlantic Blue Pearl
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After all, to change out just the water pump down the road requires that you do almost a complete timing belt change, but don't change the belt. It requires just as much work. So replace it.
This. I *always* change the WP with the TB. I also pop for all the tensioners and pulleys and everything. I had a TB snap on me once in my old Civic...the belt had no more than 50k miles on it. After replacing half the valves and spending $1700, I was less than happy. I try to minimize it from ever happening again by replacing everything all at once.
 

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Not sure who makes the water pump for Subaru. But they are known for being very durable and running 200K with little issue. Proper coolant maint is the major factor in this.

I'm not a fan of after market parts like this given I've never seen an Aftermarket part last as long as the OEM stuff. Unless its OEM and simply being sold under the makers brand vs Subaru's name.
 

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01 VDC, 05 R Sedan, 06 BAJA EJ257
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Its a toss up. Subaru engineered the pump to last a long time. I'll put it this way, the water pump on an H6 is designed to never need replacement. The H4, its a sturdy pump. As long as you keep the coolant system clean it will last. Gasket, that's iffy. Maybe replace the gasket while you're in there. Definitely replace the thermostat, OE Subaru.
 

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Legacy Outback Wagon 2.5i Ltd 2005 non-turbo, manual
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I have someone working on my car today. The timing belt, kit with all tensioners, and a water pump, and a subaru wp gasket. When is it necessary to have belt changed again? he didn't change camshaft and crankshaft seals, or oil ring. Nothing was leaking. Probably should be done next time around?
 

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Somebody Else's XT
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I have someone working on my car today. The timing belt, kit with all tensioners, and a water pump, and a subaru wp gasket. When is it necessary to have belt changed again? he didn't change camshaft and crankshaft seals, or oil ring. Nothing was leaking. Probably should be done next time around?
105,000 miles or 105 months, whichever comes first.

I'd think about doing the seals anyway, as they dry out over time even if you see no leak today.
 
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