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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have a 2006 Outback and had the timing belt done at around 108K miles almost 2 years ago. It now has 131,100 miles, and I am taking the car in to have the head gaskets replaced (just had the valve covers done, as well as a bunch of other things replaced in the last year).

When they replaced the TB, i had them do the water pump, pulleys, etc. I am leaning towards having the timing belt changed again, since I would just be paying for the belt. I figure the cost of the belt now is cheaper than paying for job again in roughly 75K miles.

Has anyone been in this same situation before, and if so, what did you choose? What other seals should I have them do with the engine out? I am going to have them change the front differential fluid as well, since they will have the car for 3 days maybe.

Thanks!
 

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who is they? a dealer? or a independent that likes subarus?

either should be out to change all the oil seals during a typical head gasket job, and machining the heads.

did you just change the timing belt? or a whole timing belt kit? (components fail, and break brand new belts).
 

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Subaru OEM belt is like $60 and labor is nonexistent in this case so why not?

Some EJ25's around this era got a dinky 7mm oil pump, if that's yours then upgrade to a 9mm.


What brand pulleys and tensioner were installed at the last timing belt change and how much did it cost you? Prorate the cost/labor/time and just do a financial comparison.

Aftermarket pulleys failing before 100,000 miles is probably a greater risk than your timing belt itself failing at 128,000 miles (23,000 more than interval specifications).

That being said - if the pulleys are aftermarket then the belt is too.

If you plan on really high mileages one thing I have done in the past is just plan on changing the belt a little early and leave it all in there as-is.

If you have aftermarket parts and will probably see another timing belt change, then that's probably what I'd do. I'd lean towards asking them to just check it and then replacing the replacement at 50-75,000 miles anyway a little early and installing an AISIN kit next time.

Well that's not true - I'd install a complete AISIN kit now, bent valves aren't worth my time/risk/money and labor on these is one hour, easy...but my labor is free....so your situation is more complicated.
 

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(formerly) 03 H6 OBW , (presently) 06 WRX Sportwagon & 2021 Honda CR-V
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if they used 'proper' parts, the belt is very robust. usually, an idler (toothed idler, I'm looking at you!) seizes or fails before a belt breaks.

BUT, there have been 1 or 2 reports of a no-name belt in one of the timing service kits failing early so......
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
who is they? a dealer? or a independent that likes subarus?

either should be out to change all the oil seals during a typical head gasket job, and machining the heads.

did you just change the timing belt? or a whole timing belt kit? (components fail, and break brand new belts).
"they", in being a local dealership - Nate Wade.

I had them change the water pump, both serpentine belts, pulleys, tensioner at 107,278 miles in August of 2016.
 

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"they", in being a local dealership - Nate Wade.

I had them change the water pump, both serpentine belts, pulleys, tensioner at 107,278 miles in August of 2016.
no reason to change out the timing belt kit or the water pump again this early. I had 30,000 miles on my OEM kit when the HG job was done.
 
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