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I've got a 2001 Outback 2.5L with 186,000 miles. About a year ago I replaced the front passenger side brake caliper after it froze up. A couple weeks ago the same caliper froze up while I was on the freeway. I drove a few miles to an exit with the steering wheel vibrating hard and towed it home. After replacing the caliper again I get a heavy grinding that is consistent with the rotation of the wheel. It sound like grinding brakes but real loud.

Here are the steps I have taken before getting stuck:
-checked brake lines, all look good
-checked brake fluid, bled out all air, it looks clean and fine
-installed new caliper
-new brake pads on front brakes (old pads on passenger side had worn at a slight angle not parallel to back of pad)
-had the rotor turned at local auto parts store

I'm definately no mechanic but try DIY as much as possible. I was thinking it could be a bearing or bad axle but not sure. Any help on troubleshooting and how to fix would really be appreciated. I cant really afford to pay a mechanic
 

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Some ideas:

Raise the RF corner, turn the wheel, and see if the sound is still there. If it is, and if it's not clear where it's coming from, take the wheel off and turn the rotor. The source of the sound should be apparent.

It's possible that the brake pads are contacting rust on the rotor due to slight differences in position since the caliper was replaced (unless the rotor was cleaned again). Another possible cause is the backing plate being slightly bent and contacting the rotor. Also, recheck the brake pads to be sure they are correctly positioned, and that the "low pad" warning clip is properly installed.

Seems unusual that the caliper on the RF "froze up" twice . . . When servicing the brakes, did you remove, clean and lubricate the caliper guide (slider) pins, using grease made specifically for these? See: http://www.subaruoutback.org/forums...ad-replacement-brake-flush-brake-bedding.html
 

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2001 Outback H6
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If you live in a rust area like me, check the dust/splash shield behind the rotor. Mine had rusted out on the bottom and was rubbing up against the rotor causing a metal on metal noise.
 

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Onyx, 2008 LL Bean 3.0R and 2017 Honda Civic Hatchback Sport Touring
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A visual inspection of the brake lines may not be sufficient. The overheating incurred by a stuck caliper could have weakened the structural integrity of the lines sufficiently that the caliper froze a second time due to the deteriorating line structure. In English: You fried your brake lines the first time and when they got hot enough it choked your caliper closed the second time.

Also, did you bed the new shoes to the turned rotor? Did you sand down the ears of the pads and use plenty of grease in the slide clips? Maybe your pads aren't releasing and some brake dust is stuck between them and the rotor. I'd take the wheel off and spray the whole thing down with brake cleaner and see how well the pads are sliding.
 

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03 H6 OBW & 06 WRX Sportwagon
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while it seems to be rare, in the hydraulic hose industry there can be faults called 'flappers' inside hoses. The the hose can act as a check-valve such that pressure is not released as readily as it is applied.

besides, replacing 12-year-old brake hoses doesn't seem like a horribly expensive or wasteful idea anyway. And one possible problem will be eliminated.
 
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