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2009 OBW 3.0R Limited (5EAT) w/ lift & other mods
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Discussion Starter #1
I was informed by Firestone Care Center that the reason my TPMS warning light keeps going on is because I have the tire pressures higher than what comes from the factory (a beefy 30/32 :rolleyes:). I have Yokohama Geolandar tires on my car and they're set to 40 PSI, which the system has decided it just can't ignore. The mechanic said the options he knew of were to either replace the sensors with aftermarket ones that can handle the higher pressure or to see if Subaru can reprogram the TPMS system to default to a higher setting.

Does anyone have experience dealing with a similar situation and if so, what options do I have? I'm getting tired of the light being on all the time and really annoyed that Subaru set the limit so low.
 

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2009 3.0R Outback
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619 Posts
I forget what the factory threshold pressures are; something like 27psi/37psi. If it could be changed with a bi-directional OB2 tool, my Launch x431 would have the option. I know it can do it on some other makes/models. Seems like for Subaru it's baked into the BCM firmware.
 

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2005 Outback Wagon 3.0 L.L. Bean
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967 Posts
That wont work. It's not the tpms sensors dictating faults, it's the tpms receiver module that decides when to turn the dash light on.
 

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05 GT wagon, 09 Spec B, 18 3.6R Outback
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In my 2009, I just place a piece of black tape over that yellow light. I have run the Conti's DWS tire at 40psi and never had a issue with the light.

Then a few years back, shortly after putting 4 new tires on, the yellow light came on. Seems the batteries in two of the sensors failed. The tape has been there since.

You really don't need that system if you know how to check your tires like you should, or a lot of us did before this system was installed.
 
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2009 OBW 3.0R Limited (5EAT) w/ lift & other mods
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230 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
The max pressure on my Geolandars is 44 PSI, and I don't see any advantage in running them so much lower to meet factory specs for a radial tire that's probably soft as **** for old people feels on the driving (which is exactly how Outbacks are from the factory (or were -- I can't speak to 2010 and newer models), regardless of the marketing as some kind of "offroad" vehicle). 40 PSI works well for me, maximizes fuel efficiency and gives a solid ride and handling. If the limit for being in sensor "OK" range is 37, I may try dropping them to that and see if that makes it go away.

The weird thing about it is that I never had this happen after buying the tires in the first place. The light only started coming on after one of them got a big hole in it that required me to buy a new tire, and in the meantime I had to keep the donut on it to get it to the shop for replacement. The light came on then because it was missing a sensor, but didn't go off once the tire with the sensor was back on the car. The sensors were all new with the new tires, and I was running 40 PSI from that point without any warning light until that tire had to be replaced, a span of a couple of years. The tech said the batteries are good in all the sensors.
 

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03 H6 OBW & 06 WRX Sportwagon
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you are quite likely to wear the center of the tread out, reducing the lifespan of the tire, and decrease traction/handling under some conditions.
 

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2005 Outback Wagon 3.0 L.L. Bean
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Upper 30s won't wear the center tread out. I've always run the summer/AS tires at upper 30s with no exaggerated center wear. Bias ply tires were subject to that. Radials do not. The PSI recommendations are based on comfort. The max pressure on tires can be run if one choses to. I would never want to run 50 PSI, That is bone jarring. @devolution is right about the increased handling virtues with higher PSI. Something as simple as higher PSI will change your cars handling. Try it, you might like it.
 
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2009 OBW 3.0R Limited (5EAT) w/ lift & other mods
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Discussion Starter #10
Geolandar G015 tires (which I have) are AT tires, not radials. They are rated for higher pressures and I have had no issues with unusual wear running them at 40 PSI, so far 12,000 miles. The problem is the car and its lack of flexibility around modifications, more than what I'm doing. I don't like just covering the light on the dash, one because it defeats the purpose of having the warning system for when the pressure gets low, especially while driving at high speed or long-distances where I can't easily keep an eye on the tires, and two because I don't really like having the light on, even if it's somewhat disguised.

It sounds like I have no choice but to lower the pressure if I want to avoid the tape route.
 

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03 H6 OBW & 06 WRX Sportwagon
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you could try to find an aftermarket TPMS system to gain-back the warning system. I worked with a guy that bought one off ebay for his vintage Firebird. It uses special valve caps.
 

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2009 OBW 3.0R Limited (5EAT) w/ lift & other mods
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Discussion Starter #12
you could try to find an aftermarket TPMS system to gain-back the warning system. I worked with a guy that bought one off ebay for his vintage Firebird. It uses special valve caps.
Yeah, that's the kind of thing I was wondering about, whether others had done this or had to. I'll have to look into it and see if I can do it without breaking the bank.
 
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