Subaru Outback Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of October's Outback of the Month Challenge!
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Long story short, I had an Impreza Wagon for many years but when it came time to change we went with Mini Clubman.

Today, we've moved to a rural suburb in the frozen tundra of Quebec and the need for a second car is real so I'm keen on going with an Outback, likely a 2.5 Touring edition, and flip-flopping between 2017 and 2018 with the tech upgrades (Apple CarPlay) and the front grill aesthetic being a big factor for a 2018 model.

I'm currently seeing some decent prices on models in my area but many have what I consider high mileage.
For example 2018s with 100,000+ km / 65,000+ miles on the odometer.

The question is what should I be worried about at those numbers? What should I be considering while I flip flop between paying more for a lower mileage model versus a great deal on a high mileage one? After seeing some other posts I believe the CVT extended warranty is a factor.

Up until now, my life consisted of driving less than 7K miles per year (in fact before 2020 we were considering going carless!) so I'm not used to seeing this kind of mileage in cars that aren't that old. Although I will definitely be clocking more mileage in our new much more remote location I don't expect it to be too crazy since I mostly work from home.
 

·
Premium Member
2016 Outback Premium 2.5 CVT w/EyeSight+SRVD
Joined
·
7,690 Posts
Considering your "new much more remote location ... in the frozen tundra of Quebec," I'd think that reliability would be near the top of your priority list. In that case I'd advise that you buy the newest, lowest mileage Outback your budget will accommodate. Subaru builds solid, reliable vehicles, but reliability is inversely related to both chronological age and use (i.e. mileage) for all machines; a harsh environment only accelerates that deterioration.
 

·
Registered
2017 Outback Touring
Joined
·
313 Posts
I drive about 5k miles/yr down heah in S Florida. I opted for a high mileage(78K miles) '17 OB Touring based on availability, condition, and price($20k). I saved $4-8K over a the same vehicle with half the mileage. 100k miles or 10 yrs warranty on the CVT was icing on the cake for me.

ammcinnis is 100% correct. I'm not afraid of Subaru's having owned tens of these products. Mileage doesn't really scare me off of them. These vehicles can take a severe beating. I can't imagine any issues that should scare you off these vehicles.

I suspect you will experience unintentional off road experiences, animal strikes, rust, battery issues, cold weather issues, the usual livin in the wilderness stuff. You are selecting the right product, IMO.

Good luck!
 

·
Premium Member
2020 Onyx
Joined
·
13,294 Posts
65,000 miles isn't that bad especially if there are complete service records. Someone was saying that the Canadian service schedule includes CVT fluid replacement at 60,000 miles.
 

·
Registered
2017 Outback Premium, silver
Joined
·
526 Posts

·
Registered
2018 3.6R Limited nav/eye purchased 8/6/18
Joined
·
337 Posts
This may not apply to you at all... The Touring model has a lower profile roof rack, which is fine for looks and aerodynamics, but not so fine if you plan to use a roof-top box, like a Thule or Yakima.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
This may not apply to you at all... The Touring model has a lower profile roof rack, which is fine for looks and aerodynamics, but not so fine if you plan to use a roof-top box, like a Thule or Yakima.
Really? I did have plans of getting bike racks or a roof-top box, what are the issues?
 

·
Registered
2018 3.6R Limited nav/eye purchased 8/6/18
Joined
·
337 Posts
There is a lot less clearance between the rooftop and crossbar on the Touring model. Check it out.
 

·
Registered
2018 3.6R Limited nav/eye purchased 8/6/18
Joined
·
337 Posts
Be aware that I have NO firsthand experience regarding this. I just gleaned that from posts on this forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,366 Posts
There is a lot less clearance between the rooftop and crossbar on the Touring model. Check it out.
You have to use either Thule or Yakima feet, and then crossbars. They are just not integrated. Lots of vehicles use those. If anything they may sit a bit higher than the integrated type.

You can get wider bars to use on the same feet, if for whatever reason you want wider bars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You have to use either Thule or Yakima feet, and then crossbars. They are just not integrated. Lots of vehicles use those. If anything they may sit a bit higher than the integrated type.

You can get wider bars to use on the same feet if for whatever reason you want wider bars.
Thanks, I'll take a look once I finally get the chance to test drive one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,366 Posts
Not a whole lot of difference between the 18 and 17, I think the head unit that was revised for 18. That head unit has issues as note. I'd pay to get the vehicle with the lowest mileage. My '17 has 59,000 in just short of 4 years (purchased end of '16). 12,000 miles per year is considered "normal".

This site will detail the changes made year to year: Subaru Outback research pages: 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009... all years/models (cars101.com)
Different headunit (larger screen)...Apple car play and android auto were added.

Changes I liked (introduced in 2018)

Auto lock/unlock
LED steering responsive headlights, no more HID
All 4 windows auto up/down (touring trim)
Front / rear exterior design changes
Individual tire tpms readings
Steering lines move with rear backup camera (and some visual enhancements for proximity alerts)
Redesigned heater controls (easier to see for me)
Blind spot detection lights in the mirror housing is easier to see
Power off delay for radio/power windows (you can listen to the radio and roll up your windows after turning off the ignition for a short time)
Backlit button on rear gate to close
It’s quieter (changes to insulation and glass in the front)
Lane keep assist setting remains set between ignition cycles
Time/temp can be displayed on the dash display
No more steering responsive fogs (those were annoying)

There’s other stuff, but those were differences I appreciated over the 2017.
 

·
Registered
2017 3.6 Touring
Joined
·
73 Posts
Sure like the heated steering wheel in our 2017 Touring OutBack.
Let us know what you end up with...
 

·
Registered
2010 Outback 3.6R 2014 Legacy 2.5i
Joined
·
3,086 Posts
Just my $.02 I would NEVER base my purchase decision upon iinfotainment. With that said, get the car you like

Far more important to me is

A. Reliability
B. Mechanical condition
C. Service History
D. Safety features (Collision Mitigation, etc)
E. Price paid in relation to above

When I buy cars, I get the car with the least amount of miles that I can. I tend to keep cars anywhere from 6 to 10 years. By that time any tech in them is quite out dated

2002 Acura Cl type S had 38K on it when I got it in 2006 sold in 2016 with 149K on it put 4K down, paid load off 2 years early. Paid $16K all in
2003 Legacy L SE had 61K on it when I got it in 2014 - Donated in September 2020 with 143K on it wrote a check for that one Paid $3K
2014 Legacy 2.5i had 19.5K on it when I got it April 2016, now has 81K on it put 1/3 down paid the rest in 11 months. Paid $23K all in

The most recent car I did something I have never done before because I did not have a house. It has worked out very well so far: I bought the cheapest 2010 Outback 3.6Rcar in reasonable condition and restored it.

2010 Outback 3.6R Premium 140K bought it for $9200 in October 2019 I put about $2K into it (cost of parts) and now it runs and drives like a new car. At the time outback 3.6R were selling for $12-14K with similar mileage. - wrote a check for that one. If the car last 3 more years, it was worth it imho. My 2 must have were Outback and 3.6L . did not care about any other options

Point is get a car that you will get the most out of for the least amount and do not be so focused on infotainment.

Cars are disposable...no need to waste a ton of $$$ on them.

I dunno how it is in Canada in regards to model year vs actual year but a 2018 car could be nearly 3.5 years old if purchased in Sept of 2017 so 65K on it relates to about 18.5K miles a year slightly above average but nothing too serious. now if they got it in early 2019 that means the mileage would be 3XK a year and that implies a large amount of high way miles.

You need to know the in service date (aka the actual day the first owner took delivery) to be able to know what the miles/year are. My Acura was sold May 2002, 2003 Legacy was November 2002 My 2014 Legacy was sold Oct 2013, my 2010 outback was sold Sept 2009
 

·
Registered
'17 OB 3.6R Touring [ex-'09 OB Ltd. (2009-16); ex-'01 Audi A6 Avant (2001-2009)]; '14 Impreza Sport Premium
Joined
·
972 Posts
This may not apply to you at all... The Touring model has a lower profile roof rack, which is fine for looks and aerodynamics, but not so fine if you plan to use a roof-top box, like a Thule or Yakima.
OTOH it does fine with my Thule kayak rack on the low profile Touring rails fir our annual 1,300 mile Cape Cod trip. Fwiw. I prefer the low profile design in general.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top