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03 H6 OBW & 06 WRX Sportwagon
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Discussion Starter #1
I know it's dangerous but I ASSUME the 4EAT delivers 50/50 power split in reverse gear - or 60/40?

Anydody seen this documented?
 

SubaruOutback.org Founder
2018 Outback Limited 2.5L - 105,000+ miles
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Carl I'd say to check over at ScoobyMods as Peaty always has all that technical mumbo jumbo somewhere on the site :)
 

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Thats a very good question.

These are the only ones that I know of.

Toyota RAV4
Toyota Siennia
Honda CR-V
Honda Passport
Hyundai Santa Fe
Ford Escape
Saturn Vue
Pontiac Aztek
Pontiac Montana
Toyota Highlander w/o LSD
Dodge Caravan

And theres probably a couple more. A good clue is whether they offer a LSD in the front or rear or both.

I dont know much about the brand new subies but you actually only have 3 wheel drive at any one time because the front diff is an open diffential which means that only one side ever gets any power if it slips or not.

If anyone knows any different please chime in.
 

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I know it's dangerous but I ASSUME the 4EAT delivers 50/50 power split in reverse gear - or 60/40?

Anydody seen this documented?

I dont think its actually dangerous. Sometimes you find yourself backing out of some awkword places or doing 3 pointers. Just assume the power split is the same as foreward.
 

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Formerly 04 Outback 3.0R VDC, now 2011 Mitsubishi Pajero GLS DiD
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Actually now that I know a little more about how the different transmissions work, since the 4EAT is normally putting 90% power to the front wheels when going forward, I would think it would be the same in reverse.
 

Tokyo's between my toes
2001 Wintergreen Outback 5MT
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Just to add to all the questions, how about a manual transmission downshifting on a slippery surface like snow? I think a few people here have talked about downshifting vs. ABS as the more desirable way to slow the car. I've done it a lot.

So, in this case, everything is moving forward but the engine effort is pulling backward...
 

Lord of ScoobyMods, ,
19' Impreza Sport 5 dr / 01' Forester S / 13' OB CVT / 10' Legacy 3.6R / 99 Mita MX-5
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Jondalar said:
Actually now that I know a little more about how the different transmissions work, since the 4EAT is normally putting 90% power to the front wheels when going forward, I would think it would be the same in reverse.
Not so:

http://www.scoobymods.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3047

In general the non VTD automatic is 60/40 with normal no slip situations in drive but can move up to as much as 95% to the front. It depends on conditions. Now the 4EAT w/ VTD is different 54:45 ish static and the VDC is different still, that gets a lot more complicated. The good news is it works well and you don't even ahve to think about it :p

I've read somewhere that when you put the car in first or reverse it goes to 50:50 but can't find the data anymore.
 

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Formerly 04 Outback 3.0R VDC, now 2011 Mitsubishi Pajero GLS DiD
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Hmmm well that's probably true but Edmunds did say the current 2005 model with 4EAT put 90% torque to the front wheels under "ideal conditions" Edmunds 2005 Outback Road Test maybe it's changed?
 

Lord of ScoobyMods, ,
19' Impreza Sport 5 dr / 01' Forester S / 13' OB CVT / 10' Legacy 3.6R / 99 Mita MX-5
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Could be, but I've seen articles that have been written up by journalists be wrong before. I just checked the subaru site :

Continuous AWD: Models equipped with 5-speed manual transmission utilize a viscous-type locking differential with torque distribution configured at a 50/50-split front-to-rear. 2.5 GT models also feature a viscous-type limited-slip rear differential.
Variable Torque Distribution (VDT) AWD: Models equipped with 5-speed automatic transmission utilize an electronically controlled variable transfer clutch in conjuction with a planetary-type center differential. Rear-wheel-biased torque distribution normally configured at 45/55-split front-to-rear. 2.5 GT models also feature a viscous-type limited-slip rear differential.
 

Tokyo's between my toes
2001 Wintergreen Outback 5MT
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I wonder if that limited slip diff would bolt up to my 98.
 
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