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Discussion Starter #1
Car has not overheated. I removed fan and tested with battery that after receiving power it spins. Tested relay works. AC works too.

I do not see the green connectors to diag my 2010 Subaru Outback 2.5

Any help would be awesome!

Thank you.
 

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03 H6 OBW & 06 WRX Sportwagon
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some folks have reported intermittent fans - not common but, you might try to tap/whack it when you think it should be running.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Sorry for wastIng you guy's time. It was a fuse in the engine box. Not sure why or when it blew, but completely overlooked that one. Still going strong after 100+ miles.


Side note, Smart Subaru quoted me a new fan for $359 after a test drive and noticing the fan was not spinning, but Autozone helped me diagnose actually recommending connecting to battery to test before spending $110 on new fan. Their tech helped me remove the fan and test on the battery. Good customer service.
 

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03 H6 OBW & 06 WRX Sportwagon
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so they are independently fused, yet run at the same time (yet, Hi and low speed)

OK!
 

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2010 2.5 CVT Premium
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Makes sense to be fused separately when one thinks about it. Why put them together such that a 30 cent fuse could be a common cause failure that takes out both fans. The more independence each can have, the more redundancy. As the OPs situ showed, one fan is enough to prevent overheating.
 

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2012 OB , 2017 Impreza
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Now your concern should be WHY the fuse blew. This does not happen by chance.
 

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so they are independently fused, yet run at the same time (yet, Hi and low speed)

OK!
Sort of.

They both always run at the same time, either in low or high speed.

When the ECM calls for the fans to be on low speed, relays are used to connect the two fan motors in series. That reduces the (common) current through the two motors, causing them to run more slowly. The current for both comes through one fuse.

However, when the ECM calls for high speed, the relays are changed. The original fuse used to power both in low speed will power only the sub-fan (right/passenger side). The power for the left side fan comes from another fuse. As both fans are now powered separately, they get full current and run at high speed.

Consequently, if the fuse used for slow speed is blown, then when the ECM calls for slow speed, neither fan will run, but when calling for high speed, the sub-fan won't work, but the main fan will.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
One thing observed with only the main/left fan running was the smell of fresh burned engine oil after parking in garage. That smell is gone now.
 
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