Subaru Outback Forums banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
2008 OB Limited 2.5i, Portland OR USA
Joined
·
6,360 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This falls into the category of "general rant".

When visiting a refueling station, I wouldn't expect that the left hand side of the pumps would be exclusively left open for only the 10-20% of cars (like Subarus) that have a right-side fuel filler access door. The lines are naturally shorter on the left side, of course, and people want to save time.

But don't line up on the "wrong side" and then take my precious time complaining to the attendant (we don't have self service in my state) that he or she dragged the fuel hose across the surface of your car and may be hurting your paint job. You line up on the left, you should expect this to happen.

Thank you for listening.
 

·
Registered
2013 Outback, 2.5i Limited w/ Moonroof
Joined
·
1,541 Posts
Ha ha. Now that's just funny. You must live in Washington or Oregon. The only states in the nation which still require full service.

If I were a fuel station attendant, after the first couple complaints, I would tell people that pull in to the wrong side, that they need to pull through and get in line on the other side.

At first I was not sure if I liked the fuel fill being on the right side of the car. But I soon realized that, at least one advantage was eliminating the risk of hitting the driver door on barrier pillars, when getting out to fill up. I've gotten to like that. But that only matters in the other 48 states.;)
 

·
Registered
13 Outback 2.5 Premium CVT
Joined
·
340 Posts
Ha ha. Now that's just funny. You must live in Washington or Oregon. The only states in the nation which still require full service.

If I were a fuel station attendant, after the first couple complaints, I would tell people that pull in to the wrong side, that they need to pull through and get in line on the other side.

At first I was not sure if I liked the fuel fill being on the right side of the car. But I soon realized that, at least one advantage was eliminating the risk of hitting the driver door on barrier pillars, when getting out to fill up. I've gotten to like that. But that only matters in the other 48 states.;)
We pump our own gas in Washington state.
 

·
Registered
2013 Legacy Lim CVT Car: 2011 OB Prem 6MT Car: 2006 Miata GT 6MT mc: 2003 Honda GL1800A * Reunite Gondwanaland *
Joined
·
3,567 Posts
...Washington or Oregon. The only states in the nation which still require full service.
Not (either) Washington. AFAIK, it's only Orygun and Joisey.

Looby
 

·
Registered
Onyx, 2008 LL Bean 3.0R and 2017 Honda Civic Hatchback Sport Touring
Joined
·
4,112 Posts
When I was a youngster I worked at a gas station and there was not self-serve. This was in the 70's and nearly all the gas caps were under the rear license plate. I spent the whole day doing deep knee bends, washing windshields, and checking scalding hot dipsticks in a polyester uniform with a "cheerful" smile on my face. I feel bad for those S.O.B.s when I need to stop for gas in NJ.

I told that part of the story to establish my age, which is my excuse for this part of the story: I have 3 vehicles and the Sube is the only one with the gas filler on the passenger side. There have been several times when I pulled into the station, got out to pump my gas and thought, I'll be damned, somebody moved my gas tank to the other side.
 

·
Premium Member
2018 Outback Limited 2.5i Dark Blue Pearl/Ivory w'Eyesight
Joined
·
703 Posts
Go to any Costco in CA. Everyone gets into the "shortest" line regardless of which side the fuel door is on, and drags the hose across, around or over their vehicle. It's funny to watch. No attendent required.
 

·
Registered
2008 OB Limited 2.5i, Portland OR USA
Joined
·
6,360 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
At first I was not sure if I liked the fuel fill being on the right side of the car. But I soon realized that, at least one advantage was eliminating the risk of hitting the driver door on barrier pillars, when getting out to fill up.

When I bought my first Outback, the salesman told me that it was originally set up that way for safety - if you ever run out of fuel on the roadside, it's safer to refuel on the right side, out of moving traffic.
 

·
Registered
2012 Outback 2.5i
Joined
·
43 Posts
At first I was not sure if I liked the fuel fill being on the right side of the car. But I soon realized that, at least one advantage was eliminating the risk of hitting the driver door on barrier pillars, when getting out to fill up.

When I bought my first Outback, the salesman told me that it was originally set up that way for safety - if you ever run out of fuel on the roadside, it's safer to refuel on the right side, out of moving traffic.
That salesman was pulling your leg Mate. The Outback was designed in Japan, a right hand drive country, so that sales pitch is bull dust.

Have a closer look at your fuel gauge and you will see a little arrow head pointing to the right. That's the side the fuel cap is on.

Oldfella
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,003 Posts
having a forrester from years gone by, I was aware of the odd side fuel door placement my past and prset experience it comes with advantages as well as the disadvanage. When people are waiting at a crowded gas station to get into the left hand fuel row, i can slip in and fuel on the right and beat the crowd.... when I picked up the ne OB 4 weeks ago I considered placing a tag with a note "FUEL ---->" on the dash as a reminder but didn't. so far only mispositioned the OB once but caught myself before getting out.:)
 

·
Registered
Lawn ornament XT
Joined
·
14,366 Posts
Have a closer look at your fuel gauge and you will see a little arrow head pointing to the right. That's the side the fuel cap is on.
...I considered placing a tag with a note "FUEL ---->" on the dash as a reminder but didn't.
Nearly every car sold in America today is marked the same way- a little arrowhead on the fuel gauge pointing to whichever side the filler neck is on.

Very handy for folks like me who rent cars often- and I usually only have the occasion to fill each one up once before returning it.

Though thinking about it, I'm not sure I've ever owned a car with the filler on the left side. What are the chances?

Edit: yep, I guess my ford truck had it on the left. All the others on the right.
 

·
Premium Member
2005 3.0 R n totaled
Joined
·
7,529 Posts
That salesman was pulling your leg Mate. The Outback was designed in Japan, a right hand drive country, so that sales pitch is bull dust.

Have a closer look at your fuel gauge and you will see a little arrow head pointing to the right. That's the side the fuel cap is on.

Oldfella
Our Outbacks are are designed here in the U.S. (not in Japan):
Subaru Research and Development, Inc.
3995 Research Park Dr, Ann Arbor, MI 48108
Nearly all Japanese brands sold in this country have design studios here in the U.S. - mostly in California.
My older son works for one in Torrance, Calif.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,003 Posts
Yep, the sales guy point that out...... nice idea but not too obvious.... maybe a better located indicator would help.
 

·
Premium Member
2005 3.0 R n totaled
Joined
·
7,529 Posts
Yep, the sales guy point that out...... nice idea but not too obvious.... maybe a better located indicator would help.
Hmmm... the designers put that arrow there assuming a driver will look at the fuel gauge at least once in a lifetime (or when they need a fill up)... LOL
 

·
Registered
2013 2.5 CVT Convenience pkg
Joined
·
114 Posts
I was always under the impression that most cars had the gas cap on the left side. Until reading this thread anyways. One of my previous cars was a 1985 4WD Toyota Tercel SR5 wagon. These were made in both FWD and 4WD versions. The funny thing is that the FWD version had the gas cap on the left, and the 4WD had the cap on the right.

When I then got my Legacy wagon, I felt right at home with having the cap on the right side.
 

·
Registered
2013 Outback 3.6R Limited
Joined
·
500 Posts
When I was researching and test driving SUVs with my GF, she pointed out the stupid location of the fuel cap (on the right side) before I noticed it. So I asked the sales guy why they put it on the right side?! I got the same scripted response as mentioned in a post above about the ride side of the car being a safer location for a gas can refill job along the road.

I chuckled and looked the salesman in the eye and asked him: "Ok, so tell me when was the last time you ran out of gas along the road?" He was nearly speechless and said, "Well never." I told him that I never had to do that either, but had to refill at a gas station on a regular basis and had to deal with their problematic placement of the filler.

Further I told the saleman that I was glad that the nincompoop at Subaru that dreamed up that "safety feature" didn't apply the same logic to the placement of the tires. He gave me a puzzled look and did not get my humor. I explained that I was glad they didn't place all four tires on the right side of the OB to avoid having a flat tire on the left side by the dangerous road. :headslap: That made him chuckle. :toothless
 

·
Registered
13 E350
Joined
·
984 Posts
there is a reason why engineers did it this way, just like the gas door opening half way so you would touch it to open completely, this discharges any static you had in you to minimize threat of spontaneous combustion
 

·
Premium Member
2018 Outback Limited 2.5i Dark Blue Pearl/Ivory w'Eyesight
Joined
·
703 Posts
there is a reason why engineers did it this way, just like the gas door opening half way so you would touch it to open completely, this discharges any static you had in you to minimize threat of spontaneous combustion
Sometimes I think it is just random. Maybe the designer was right or left handed, or since GM does it this way, we'll do it that way. I regularly deal with 20-30 different cars a day, and even among the same brand, the filler can be on opposite sides of the car/suv/truck--Minivans, packers and cargo vans almost always have the filler on the left side, however, regardless of manufacturer. Whats funny, is some have remote releases, some you push in on the door, and some you lift out the door.
 

·
Registered
'13 Outback Premium 6MT
Joined
·
110 Posts
there is a reason why engineers did it this way, just like the gas door opening half way so you would touch it to open completely, this discharges any static you had in you to minimize threat of spontaneous combustion
Um no. Its done this way because a spring to push it all the way open is more expensive and takes up a lot more packaging space. It opens only as far as is needed to fit fingers in to lift it the rest of the way.

Besides, do you really want the static discharge (i.e. SPARK) to be at the fuel opening? I sure don't.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top