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2020 Touring XT, 2013 Outback Lim SAP 270K, 2003 Outback Lim MT 2.5L, 241K..
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Discussion Starter #1
I am wondering what people recommend if driving a long distance while still in break in period.
I have 450 miles on my car and am driving from LA to the bay area tomorrow. I know one of the things to not do is drive the same speed for a long period of time - but how to I avoid this on a long drive like that?
 

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03 Outback H6 base
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252 Posts
Just watch your speedo and adjust your speed +/- 5 mph every few minutes. You could also take the scenic route up HWY 1. Both you and your new car will like the drive and keep you off the freeway....:29:

.
 

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2013 2.5i Premium 6mt, Twilight Blue
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Agree with above. With the normal flow of traffic you'll be varying your speed enough to not stay in one RPM spot for too long. Should be fine and a good way to pile on some miles to get out of the break-in period.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Just watch your speedo and adjust your speed +/- 5 mph every few minutes. You could also take the scenic route up HWY 1. Both you and your new car will like the drive and keep you off the freeway....:29:

.

would LOVE to - but its a short trip and I need to get up to Petaluma - another hour or so from bay area.

HWY 1 WILL happen though. This new car demands it! ;) (along with the 395 - this time WITHOUT breaking down, up to Sequoia National Park (my home away from home), trip to Albuquerque, hopefully back to Utah, and if Im lucky a drive up to Oregon in the next year or so.

no wonder I averaged 24,000 a year on my last car.
 

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2005 3.0 R n totaled
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I took a 200 mile trip right off the dealer's lot with car having some 18 miles on it. I suggest not to use cruise control - otherwise you will be fine. I would take 101 (or 1) rather than I-5 from L.A. to the S.F Bay area. After you pass Sta Barbara there is quite a variable speed highway going up North. But I am sure you know it!
 

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Tungsten 2017 2.5 Limited w Eyesight SOLD!
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All the good advice as previously mentioned and I would add to that to keep an eye on your oil level as well.
 

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2020 Touring XT, 2013 Outback Lim SAP 270K, 2003 Outback Lim MT 2.5L, 241K..
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Discussion Starter #7
thanks everyone for the advice - unfortunately I dont have time to do anything but the 5 but know those other (much more scenic) routes well. ;)
 

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2018 Outback Limited 2.5i Dark Blue Pearl/Ivory w'Eyesight
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703 Posts
At 350 miles, and one week, I took off from home to Southern Oregon, up I-5 and over the Siskiyous. No problems at all. didn't use cruise until 1K, traffic was all over the place, and cruise is not always the best for parts of I-5. Enjoy your journey.
 

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2013 Legacy Lim CVT Car: 2011 OB Prem 6MT Car: 2006 Miata GT 6MT mc: 2003 Honda GL1800A * Reunite Gondwanaland *
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Which transmission?


If it's a CVT, just put it in full automatic, set the cruise control,
and forget about it. With that transmission, you couldn't hold
a constant RPM if you tried.

 

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2005 3.0 R n totaled
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If it's a CVT, just put it in full automatic, set the cruise control,
and forget about it. With that transmission, you couldn't hold
a constant RPM if you tried.
Owner's manual specifically warns drivers NOT to use cruise control for the first 1000 miles on 2013 OB .... does yours say otherwise?
 

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2013 Legacy Lim CVT Car: 2011 OB Prem 6MT Car: 2006 Miata GT 6MT mc: 2003 Honda GL1800A * Reunite Gondwanaland *
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Owner's manual specifically warns drivers NOT to use cruise control
for the first 1000 miles on 2013 OB .... does yours say otherwise?
Unquestioning obedience is strongly recommended for weak minds.

What's true for the 6MT, 5EAT or CVT in "manual mode" ain't true for
the CVT in fully automatic mode. Mother Soobie's manual writers
probably didn't want to risk confusing the mechanically challenged.

"A little inaccuracy sometimes saves tons of explanation."
- Saki

 

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2005 3.0 R n totaled
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"Weak minds" would typically like to protect the warranty and follow the user's handbook. My son, who works at Toyota/Lexus HQ in Torrance, CA, is one of many who compose user's manuals for less mechanically inclined. Altough they don't deal directly with public they get daily inputs from Lexus call center and incorporate changes based on customers complaints, considering the warranty issues. One would suspect that Subaru does the same!
 

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2005 3.0 R n totaled
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Looby: Criticism is an indirect form of self-boasting.
Do you have anything positive to say today?
Happy New Year!
 

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2020 Touring XT, 2013 Outback Lim SAP 270K, 2003 Outback Lim MT 2.5L, 241K..
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Discussion Starter #14
Looby: Criticism is an indirect form of self-boasting.
Do you have anything positive to say today?
Happy New Year!
Well its all over now - my 1000 miles is done. I have no idea if I really did what I should have done - I didnt drive it hard in general - only tried the cruise control for a mile or two here and there - not on this trip but back home. I have spent a lot of my life questioning authority - Im ok with taking some instruction from the manual on how to drive it early on. ;)
The 5 was certainly busy enough yesterday that there was no way I could drive one speed for long.

Happy New Year everyone!
 

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I'm a little suspicious of owner's manuals in general. After owning a number of cars and looking up information in the manuals, I have repeatedly found information that was either wholly untrue, inaccurate, or generalized to save explaining the exceptions. The Japanese manufacturers are the most accurate from my personal experience, for what it's worth.

I'll reference two extreme examples of me abusing my car and ignoring recommendations for activities far outside the manufacturer's recommendations I did numerous things in younger days that I would not recommend (young male, go figure), but were learning experiences for owner's manual recommendations. Since this forum is Subaru, I'll reference my '99 Forester.

1. I bought a really cheap Forester in Pennsylvania and towed it on a tow dolly (front up, rear down) to Missouri. Afterwards, I read that towing it on a tow dolly will cause damage. After 100,000 MORE miles on that car, I never had any transmission or diff issues. I have since had several people get irate in explaining that it was impossible and would cause catastrophic damage. If it caused anything at all, it's completely unnoticeable after 100,000 more miles, so not an issue.

2. In no way would I condone this now. When younger and dumber, I used the same Forester and a Harbor Freight tow bar to tow a truck stuffed full of gear from central Colorado to Tennessee. I would have used the truck to tow the Forester, but it wasn't street legal to drive. After adding up all the weight, I suspect it was ~9000lbs. No catastrophic failures, no problems, and that poor Forester still runs like a champ years later with 240,000 miles on it.

I'm not recommending for anyone to ignore the owner's manual recommendations. There is USUALLY a reason for most of the recommendations. I'm just saying, exceptions exist.
 

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2018 Outback Limited 2.5i Dark Blue Pearl/Ivory w'Eyesight
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I'm a little suspicious of owner's manuals in general. After owning a number of cars and looking up information in the manuals, I have repeatedly found information that was either wholly untrue, inaccurate, or generalized to save explaining the exceptions. The Japanese manufacturers are the most accurate from my personal experience, for what it's worth.

I'll reference two extreme examples of me abusing my car and ignoring recommendations for activities far outside the manufacturer's recommendations I did numerous things in younger days that I would not recommend (young male, go figure), but were learning experiences for owner's manual recommendations. Since this forum is Subaru, I'll reference my '99 Forester.

1. I bought a really cheap Forester in Pennsylvania and towed it on a tow dolly (front up, rear down) to Missouri. Afterwards, I read that towing it on a tow dolly will cause damage. After 100,000 MORE miles on that car, I never had any transmission or diff issues. I have since had several people get irate in explaining that it was impossible and would cause catastrophic damage. If it caused anything at all, it's completely unnoticeable after 100,000 more miles, so not an issue.

2. In no way would I condone this now. When younger and dumber, I used the same Forester and a Harbor Freight tow bar to tow a truck stuffed full of gear from central Colorado to Tennessee. I would have used the truck to tow the Forester, but it wasn't street legal to drive. After adding up all the weight, I suspect it was ~9000lbs. No catastrophic failures, no problems, and that poor Forester still runs like a champ years later with 240,000 miles on it.

I'm not recommending for anyone to ignore the owner's manual recommendations. There is USUALLY a reason for most of the recommendations. I'm just saying, exceptions exist.
Question is, however, just whom would you have 'blamed' if something had gone wrong in either of those two instances, and for all exceptions, how does one know that it's "the exception and not the rule". Just curious. I, too, was young and dumb once.
 

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There's no blame in such situations. It's all part of experimenting with a car. I'm just a scientist by nature. Assess the variables (hopefully accurately), try something, get a result. When it comes to experiments on mechanical projects, you have to be prepared for the outcome. I prefer to do some background research and then search for the likelihood of worst-case-scenarios. When it comes to knowing which parts of the owner's manual are inaccurate, actually are harmful to the car, allow for alterations, or are exceptions to their recommendations, it is up to the owner's discretion. No secret tricks. Some things are well known inaccuracies or manufacturer oversights on specific vehicles, but it's up to the owner to decide what he/she is willing to experiment with. Fortunately, unlike other things, these are just machines and they can be fixed.
 

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2005 3.0 R n totaled
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You could do all the "experiments" once the car is out of warranty, I would think - I do anyway....great deal of research (psychological, mechanical and legal) goes into these manuals - but, they are never perfect or complete - like nothing in life!
 

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2013 Legacy Lim CVT Car: 2011 OB Prem 6MT Car: 2006 Miata GT 6MT mc: 2003 Honda GL1800A * Reunite Gondwanaland *
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In the case of using cruise control during break-in with CVT,
the only "experiment" required is to watch the freakin' tach.
If you can figure out a way to hold anything even close to
constant rpm while in fully automatic mode, please explain
how you did it.

"One measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions."
- Looby

 
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