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The SkyRise 3(Medium) only weighs 115 lbs, so it is well under the 150 lb maximum dynamic load limit for the roof. Tepui even uses an Outback with stock crossbars as their demonstration vehicle on several of their tents.

My brother in law just ordered a Tepui Explorer Autana 3. He has a tacoma and 2013 OB and I have a 2018 OB. Once it comes in I will try mounting it to the two Outbacks on stock crossbars and taking pictures if its not too much of a process.

We ended up getting the Yakima Landing pad and crossbar system for added strength/piece of mind.
 

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Im not sure why it would be an issue. Each rack is held bt 6-8 bolts threaded through metal roof structure. Non issue. Static load of sleepers on the roof is also a non issue.

On the flip side my Land cruiser which was sold new for $52,000 in 93 had a rack held on place by two wood screws screwed into plastic fittings popped into the sheet metal. 😳

The plastic fender flares had more solid mounting than the rack did!
 

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IMO, RTT are not ideal by any means. A stand alone works much better.

Breaking down camp every time you want to use the car, as a car, doesn't make sense to me.
Agreed. I just don't see the advantage of having a tent on the car roof vs. on the ground.

Besides, climbing down that ladder to take a leak at 3:00am could be hazardous...
 

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Agreed. I just don't see the advantage of having a tent on the car roof vs. on the ground.

Besides, climbing down that ladder to take a leak at 3:00am could be hazardous...
Not to mention if you bring your dog camping, good luck getting him out of the tent. Better teach them to climb ladders.
 

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The SkyRise 3(Medium) only weighs 115 lbs, so it is well under the 150 lb maximum dynamic load limit for the roof. ...


What if people climb in the tent? <img src="http://www.subaruoutback.org/forums/images/smilies/confused.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Confused" class="inlineimg" />
While you driving? Thats would be extreme haha.when car standing you can get on roof no prob. Cant drive with person in tent on roof thou
 

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A buddy of mine just bought a Tepui Ayer. He had planned on mounting it on his roof but he had a **** of a time getting it up there and didn't want to deal with the MPG hit. In the end he had a trailer built for it (6x8 or so) that locks up under the tent so he can store his gear there. If he needs to go somewhere he can just unhitch it and go vs having to break it down. Guy down from me has one on his LR, his reason for a RTT was (a) overlanding and (b) he wanted to be above whatever critters walk around camp at night.
 

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Agreed. I just don't see the advantage of having a tent on the car roof vs. on the ground.

Besides, climbing down that ladder to take a leak at 3:00am could be hazardous...
If you're camping in designated drive-in campgrounds and you want to use that as basecamp and drive around, then you definitely have a point.

But - if you're doing any sort of overland overnighting or exploring where you don't have the luxury of a flat, clear and dry spot to pitch a tent, then a rooftop guarantees you a nice, flat, padded floor (as long as you can park reasonably level or prop up a tire on a rock). No ground critters and rivers of runoff from a sudden downpour to worry about, and you don't have to disassemble and roll up a wet, dirt and needle-covered tent only to have to unroll and clean it again later. In many cases you can add an awning or ground vestibule to add usable space, and pitching's easier since you've already got half of it propped up on the car.

I've got a hard-top roof tent and it only takes 1 minute to set up the tent, maybe 2 minutes to take down. I've done way more spontaneous overnight camping / exploring with my RTT then I ever did before with a regular tent.

The only drag regardless is the 3am wake-up call - there's not much getting around the inconvenience of that (well, none of them I'd want to try anyway!)
 

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I was watching this video and saw that they installed the RTT on the factory bars.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JKWcatEdLf8



I personally cringe with the thought of mounting anything to these bars.


I'm currently making my own mounts like these guys:


http://www.subaruoutback.org/forums/138-gen-5-2015-present/391682-diy-alternative-factory-cross-bars-15-outback.html


Has anyone used the factory bars to mount the RTT?



Am I wrong to think the factory bars won't hold?

I've read before in the forum somewhere that the roof rail/crossbar assembly was supplied by either Thule or Yakima (can't remember which). If that's the case, I'd think they'd have plenty of expertise in design and load-testing to make something safe if used as directed. That said, I still crawled up on my roof and used my weight (160lbs) to load the rack in various ways to see how they'd perform before I loaded my roof-tent up there. They flexed a bit, especially if loaded in the centre (you're supposed to load them evenly), but if weighted across their widths and especially at the ends, they seemed fine.

My roof tent is 162lbs. I took out the ladder to shed a bit of weight and bring it to around 150, but it went on fine, and had no issues for the 7 months it was on there. It saw highways, city streets (lots of patched asphalt), gravel photholed and washboarded roads, and had anywhere from 4 kids and a grandma to 3 grown men (up to 180lbs each) with gear up there.

One thing I can confirm is that the crossbar extrusions are metal (likely aluminum), not plastic as some have mentioned. The ends appear to be plastic, but there are some out there I've heard rival steel in strength so I'm guessing they're up for the task. The extrusion finish is a pretty tough powder-coat(?) and resists scratching pretty well.

I'm not at all saying these bars can or should be overloaded, but despite their appearance, seem to be able to perform as intended.
 

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@Marcso What tent are you using. I like the idea of a hard top rather than the usual soft ones.
It's an iKamper Skycamp. They're a South Korean company, and are currently the largest hardshell out there. The whole thing folds out to be essentially a king-sized mattress. I had to wait a while for mine to get made and shipped, but I was a Kickstarter backer for the new model. They've been busy setting up distribution in the US and abroad for it and I can personally say I love this thing. Not perfect, but nothing a little creativity can't overcome. Drifta also has made some custom accessories for it. There's a forum and a Facebook group with lots of info from users.

https://www.ikamper.com

https://offroadtents.com/blogs/news/8-hardshell-roof-top-tents-that-will-soften-your-senses-1
 

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So why in general roof tent would be needed instead of ground tent? Like scared of animals , snakes? Or flood or any other reason to sleep up there? Not all ppl like idea of getting up lader to go sleep and then going down half awake.
I know its kinda looks cool and all. And you dont need special space for tent but people use them in camping spots as well where is plenty space on ground
 

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So why in general roof tent would be needed instead of ground tent?
What he said.

Yakima Skyrise tent carries a $1,050 retail price. Carry weight is 95 pounds, which is about like carrying an extra 12 gallons of water. Packed carrying size (48 x 42 x 12 inches) makes it quite a large profile on top of the car when transporting, and also in your garage to store it for the 99% of the time when you're not using it. And having it up there precludes putting on a car topper for carrying other gear.

On a good day I go in to REI and get a pretty good ground tent for $70. Weighs 4-5 pounds. Rolls up and bags into a soft sleeping bag size package that I can easily stow inside the car.

And yes, I've encountered black bears in campgrounds in the Olympics when I was using a ground tent. Once our group had to drive one off with sharp trekking poles, and I was about to break out my ice axe for self defense, this guy was so aggressive. That's why you use a hanging wire or bear cannister for your food and don't keep it with you in the tent, and if they're still coming at you, you stick together and put up a united front against him. A car top tent won't insulate you from them, they would have no issue climbing the hood and windshield of the car.
 

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Its an ongoing debate on any forum and can come down to a matter of personal preference.

We are going on an 18 day road trip. We wanted somewhere more comfortable than my dome tent to sleep in. The roof top tent has a mattress, you can leave pillows/sleeping bag inside when its folded, it takes 5-10 minutes to set up or break down no matter what the weather is doing, and can double as a awning. My REI tent takes me 5 minutes to put together on its own, and if you add in inflating/deflating my sleeping pad, rolling up/out my bag, and doing all that in inclement weather and going to bed wet with wet gear is 0 fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I've read before in the forum somewhere that the roof rail/crossbar assembly was supplied by either Thule or Yakima (can't remember which). If that's the case, I'd think they'd have plenty of expertise in design and load-testing to make something safe if used as directed. That said, I still crawled up on my roof and used my weight (160lbs) to load the rack in various ways to see how they'd perform before I loaded my roof-tent up there. They flexed a bit, especially if loaded in the centre (you're supposed to load them evenly), but if weighted across their widths and especially at the ends, they seemed fine.

My roof tent is 162lbs. I took out the ladder to shed a bit of weight and bring it to around 150, but it went on fine, and had no issues for the 7 months it was on there. It saw highways, city streets (lots of patched asphalt), gravel photholed and washboarded roads, and had anywhere from 4 kids and a grandma to 3 grown men (up to 180lbs each) with gear up there.

One thing I can confirm is that the crossbar extrusions are metal (likely aluminum), not plastic as some have mentioned. The ends appear to be plastic, but there are some out there I've heard rival steel in strength so I'm guessing they're up for the task. The extrusion finish is a pretty tough powder-coat(?) and resists scratching pretty well.

I'm not at all saying these bars can or should be overloaded, but despite their appearance, seem to be able to perform as intended.
I checked mine last night and yes, they are not plastic.


Both bar and mounts are metal... the mounts are wrapped in plastic.
 

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I'll never understand the hate the factory bars get.

Are they the best most robust bars around capable of mounting an M2A1? No.

Are they wonderful and thoughtfully designed for their target demographic? Yes.

That is to say that the vast majority of owners never use the roof rack. The ones that do use them only occasionally throw furniture, plywood, a small boat, etc up there.

With no penalty in wind noise or gas mileage from permanent cross bars. They deploy with no tools needed and have tie downs built in.

You can go from no cross bars to having a kayak on the roof in 5 minutes and it will be so secure that you can shake the car with the kayak.

The small numbers of owners who the factory cross bars wouldn't work for would likely replace the older style cross bars anyway as they weren't any more robust.

I'm still undecided on the roof top tent. I see the appeal but the price point usually turns me off so it's a wash. I mostly backpack so I'm used to hammocks.

Those who get roof tents seem to love them though. I wouldn't think twice about mounting one to the factory bars.
 
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