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Wouldn’t a little oil based rust proofing keep the rustles away...? I did not do the Outback but am seriously considering doing our new crosstrek limited...
Have a suggested product for that? I would do the Baja and the 3.6.
 

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Have a suggested product for that? I would do the Baja and the 3.6.
asked locally to a farmer that uses "old" pickups that look like new. one is a 1985 chevy 1 ton duelly.

2 parts use engine oil, to 1 part diesel fuel.

the diesel makes it creep,

he applies it with compressed air,

and does it outside, as inside the drips would make for quite a mess.

I guess I would recommend putting the car up on 4 ramps on some sacrificial earth, (jackstands can suck outside).
far away from a well, and blacktop.

....but hey you live in WV so anyplace is great.
 

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Have a suggested product for that? I would do the Baja and the 3.6.

Decades ago I used to do my own rustproofing using the red Rustoleum rust metal primer ( the stuff with fish oil in it). Would heat it up ( to thin it out a bit) and pour it into the bottom of the doors to seal the seams ( just enough to do the sealing on the first go) then brush in 2-3 more coats. Did the same to the insides of the front fenders, the rear wheel wells, and the whole undersides of the car. Seemed to do the job, since those cars never rusted afterwards ( Maine & Massachusetts salty road winters). I plan on doing the same to my 2 OB's. Will probably take pictures and post them when I finally do it.
 

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asked locally to a farmer that uses "old" pickups that look like new. one is a 1985 chevy 1 ton duelly.

2 parts use engine oil, to 1 part diesel fuel.
I know of guys that have put oil on but didn't realize it was used oil. Did some searching around...

https://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=2874796

Has a good thread on it. Some questions about environmental concerns plus some suggestions for "Krown" and "Fluid Film"

Krown looks like appointments only and you have to go to their location. Similar to Line X for truck beds. Looks like they get good reviews but not something the DIY weekend warrior type like me would do.

Fluid Film however, does. There is a 3 pack here for 30 bucks it looks like it only lasts a season so would have to be applied every fall.

I like the idea of painting it with something too and forgetting about it. The problem is I haven't found anything that will really hold up that is something the DIY type can do. I tried tank enamel on the lift kit and its chipped/surface rusting after 2.5 years. Wish I would have gotten it powder coated as the newer ones are.
 

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asked locally to a farmer that uses "old" pickups that look like new. one is a 1985 chevy 1 ton duelly.

2 parts use engine oil, to 1 part diesel fuel.

.



Used to be common in Vermont ('50's, '60's) for everyone to get their undersides sprayed with used motor oil in the fall, and maybe once again half way through the winter. Didn't do anything for the insides of the doors, etc, where they couldn't easily get to to spray, unfortunately. Most likely has been outlawed by now!
 

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Used to be common in Vermont ('50's, '60's) for everyone to get their undersides sprayed with used motor oil in the fall, and maybe once again half way through the winter. Didn't do anything for the insides of the doors, etc, where they couldn't easily get to to spray, unfortunately. Most likely has been outlawed by now!
canucks do it annually.

@brucep (of vermont), said he goes to a local garage every Nov or December on appointment,

one day a week, in one bay of the garage is fluid film spray time. just go to the car wash before you get there.

(edit: later correction = 4 bays of a 4 bay garage )

____

but I like the idea of used engine oil = free. so that plus some cheap diesel could do the same as a DIY.

in fact maybe we should start a thread on it.:smile2:

(edit: cut the last bunch of posts off another thread to start one)

_____

edit2: in intervening fall months of 2018 I have repainted the bottom of my H6 wagon, put "duplicolor bed armor" (gummy pickup truck bed coating) under most of it.
used Transtar sprayed inside the sills which came in about $17 per spray gan. which stays tacky,...the lanolin stuff would have been half the cost, but the transtar was already in it at the time.

so no diesel / engine oil used like a old school farmer
 

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Have a suggested product for that? I would do the Baja and the 3.6.
Here in Canada there are two very popular ones, rust check and known rust proofing. It is spayed in using various wands under high pressure...that atomizes it so it gets into all the seams etc. The down side is that they need to drill holes to access some areas of the car. Usually one in each door, and two in the side sill area of the door frame. The holes are then plugged using removable greased plugs. The idea is to do it annually. You can refuse to have them drill and do those areas but that voids their warranty. I struggle with drilling holes in my car...

Rust check sells their product in an aerosol can at Canadian Tire stores...I do my own own doors through the drain holes in the bottom of the doors or other factory openings. I had an old ‘93 civic that I did regularity...I believe this stuff works.

This stuff is NOT used motor oil...in is manufactured specifically for this purpose

Www.krown.com Rust Check | Cars | Vans | Trucks - Best Rust Proofing Application
 

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canucks do it annually.
Environmental vs Health concerns.

We live in such a strange world. In Canada, this is OK, but high fructose corn syrup isn't.

In the US, it's d*mn near impossible to find something without it. It's even in many things we market as being healthy. It's outlawed in most of the developed world. But not here, we like our corn juice. weather it be in the gas tank or the tummy. I wonder if high fructose corn syrup can be used a rust inhibitor? Or is it's sole purpose to make us fat?
 

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I wonder if high fructose corn syrup can be used a rust inhibitor? Or is it's sole purpose to make us fat?

might attract rodents, insects like fire ants,

...bears, mountain lions,....with rabies.
 

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Environmental vs Health concerns.

I wonder if high fructose corn syrup can be used a rust inhibitor? Or is it's sole purpose to make us fat?



Well, you could get nice and fat using it, then go in for liposuction, render down the fat, and use it for your rust protection........:surprise:
 

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For all us on the South side of the border, and who are nowhere near a Krown shop, Fluid Film is a great option.

The advantage to Fluid Film is it's fairly inexpensive. About $10 a can at Lowes or NAPA. And it's very effective. I've read a lot of very positive reviews, including many who have used it for many years and report excellent results. The disadvantage is it needs to be applied every year. I like to use Fluid Film around the suspension, where there are moving parts.

If you are looking for something that is far more permanent, I would highly recommend 3M Professional Grade Rubberized Coating. I applied this to my Outback the first year after I bought it, to fill in many areas where the factory coating didn't quite cover as well as I though it should. When I was done, it was almost impossible to tell the difference between the factory coating and the 3M coating. Both had a very similar texture and thickness.

I like the 3M product because it is permanent, and it also offers a noticeable level of sound deadening. I think it is a better choice for large areas such as the floor pan and the spare tire well.

You do need to be more careful using it, however. It doesn't clean up easily. Mask real well. Cover the floor real well. And wear old clothes that can be thrown away. I recommend wearing a cheap hair net too. Just in case.

https://www.oreillyauto.com/detail/b/3m-4307/chemicals---fluids-16461/paint---body-repair-16614/undercoating---anti-rust-17762/c29dabe74841/3m-16-ounce-undercoating/03584/4461476/2007/mercedes-benz/sl550?q=Undercoating+&pos=7


Whichever product you choose, it is very important to make sure your undercarriage is not only clean, but totally dry. The last thing you want to do is permanently trap moisture between the under body and the coating.

I try to pick a warm day before the end of summer, to wash the undercarriage real good, then let the car dry out in the sun all day. Then apply the coating in the late evening.
 

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Just to interject.... the stuff they spray on my (Vermont) vehicles annually is FROM Canada.... I would not be surprised if it were not that "krown" stuff mentioned above.

The stuff is black-n-sticky when first applied. It is kinda stinky for a couple weeks. After several months, it dries into hard black coating.

As I said before, the local mechanic dedicates his ENTIRE shop (4 bays) for several days to do the undercoatings. I would not be surprised if they pump thru 100s of vehicles over that time.

They use a wand to 'surgically' apply the coating. In this way, the brake-lines are coated from end-to-end as well as suspension and body-cavities.

BTW: Many commercial "Fluid Films" are based on LANOLIN or LINSEED oil with some proprietary additives.
 

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Just to interject.... the stuff they spray on my (Vermont) vehicles annually is FROM Canada.... I would not be surprised if it were not that "krown" stuff mentioned above.

The stuff is black-n-sticky when first applied. It is kinda stinky for a couple weeks. After several months, it dries into hard black coating.

As I said before, the local mechanic dedicates his ENTIRE shop (4 bays) for several days to do the undercoatings. I would not be surprised if they pump thru 100s of vehicles over that time.

They use a wand to 'surgically' apply the coating. In this way, the brake-lines are coated from end-to-end as well as suspension and body-cavities.

BTW: Many commercial "Fluid Films" are based on LANOLIN or LINSEED oil with some proprietary additives.
could you find a pic or a listing of the wand they use? (or a similar type ?)
 

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On new or well maintained vehicles - Amsoil Metal Protector HD - goes on as a liquid from a spray can and dries like candle wax. Very resistant to washing off and does NOT attract dust like a wet product. Amazing stuff!! Best applied early on to clean surfaces, but can also be applied to already rusty surfaces. I applied several cans to my 2018 outback and my 2016 Passat when each of them had less than 200 miles on them. It is holding up very well on both of these cars. Some pics and a discussion on a Tacoma forum: https://www.tacomaworld.com/threads/tacoma-rust-prevention-experiment.310580/


I use fluid film on my 2000 f250 that was not maintained well earlier in its life by the previous owner. I just apply the fluid fil all over on the underbody. While my truck is only rarely driven in MD (little snow but they do use the liquid salt on roads in winter and I am near saltwater) it seems like i will need to re-apply the fluid film every three years. It seems like the amsoil on my passat has not been affected at all in two years and it is my daily driver/commuter car.
 

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Interesting stuff. I'll have to look into the 'how' to use Fluid Film effectively. I just got a new to me 08 OBXT a couple months ago, was originally sold in New Mexico and grew up in Tennessee, hasn't seen a Michigan winter yet. (that was the idea... I got sick of dealing with the rust problems 15 years of Michigan winters made on the 03) Best if I can protect it as much as possible!!
Side note, Fluid Film is absolutely amazing for using on corroded bolts, etc also. Way better than even PBlaster (which is hands down better than WD40) which is why I already have a can. Sounds like I'll need more than that to winter prep though.
 

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Waxes based Teflon spray. Sold as chain lube
 

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Just to interject.... the stuff they spray on my (Vermont) vehicles annually is FROM Canada.... I would not be surprised if it were not that "krown" stuff mentioned above.

The stuff is black-n-sticky when first applied. It is kinda stinky for a couple weeks. After several months, it dries into hard black coating.

As I said before, the local mechanic dedicates his ENTIRE shop (4 bays) for several days to do the undercoatings. I would not be surprised if they pump thru 100s of vehicles over that time.

They use a wand to 'surgically' apply the coating. In this way, the brake-lines are coated from end-to-end as well as suspension and body-cavities.

BTW: Many commercial "Fluid Films" are based on LANOLIN or LINSEED oil with some proprietary additives.
Yes, Fluid Film is lanolin based.
 

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Being an aircraft owner that is also concerned with corrosion, I use Corrosion X or AFC-50 on airplanes and am planning on coating the underside of my newly purchased 2018 Outback with it. Here's an article about corrosion protection on aircraft if anyone is interested and looking for knowledge on the subject.
Aircraft Corrosion - AOPA
 
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