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2014 OB 3.6R SAP
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I have used fluid film on our cars for 3 years now and think it’s the best option in our area of Ohio. I can get it done for $100 including full undercarriage and wheel wells, doors (drill holes if wanted or use the drain holes if no drilling desired), hood and tailgate/trunk. If you got it done year prior they do everything minus doors, trunk and tailgate for $75. Not bad!

I opted for no drilling on our 14 OB (couldn’t bring myself to do it, just used drain holes) but got my 05 forester drilled this time around. They also drilled into rear door sill area to get rear quarter panels. Hopefully that stops any potential rust in its tracks.

I have the shop do it in the late fall before first snow after I have gone through an under spray car wash to get it as clean as possible. I have some spare cans at home to do touch up if needed. I’ve found that driving in rain at high speeds and very wet conditions before snow hits can wash away some of it behind the front tires on the undercarriage (think front pinch weld to rear pinch weld). So I use the cans to tough up before the full on winter, along with a few other areas in the engine bay, etc.

I have used spray on bedliner prior one year and that was not a good idea. It can trap water if you don’t get 100% coverage (who really does) and can cause rust from inside out. My BIL started getting his oil sprayed but the dripping wait period and the environmental concern led me away from that.

So far so good.
 

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2019 Outback Wagon 2.5i limited
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FLUID FILM BIG BROTHER
Has anyone tried the WoolWax formulation of Fluid Film. Thicker, with no smell supposedly. The fluid film wash off after a winter of use, so I may try this next fall.
Of course Amazon also sells it also. You can get it black or clear, I think I would prefer the clear myself.
 

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2014 OB 3.6R SAP
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130 Posts
FLUID FILM BIG BROTHER
Has anyone tried the WoolWax formulation of Fluid Film. Thicker, with no smell supposedly. The fluid film wash off after a winter of use, so I may try this next fall.
Of course Amazon also sells it also. You can get it black or clear, I think I would prefer the clear myself.
Looks nice! I’ve debated doing the undercoating myself. I may need to try it.
 

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I saw woolwax when researching some other options. Looks like a good candidate - the few complaints I have seen online were about the ease to apply using their spray guns - but then I don't know the exact circumstances of the people complaining (wasn't a review of the spray can version). I'd probably opt for woolwax if I were to spray the underside.
 

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2010 Outback 3.6R 2014 Legacy 2.5i 2003 Legacy L special edition (retired to backup)
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1,123 Posts
you need to use a high capacity compressor and heat that up un warm water first.

here is a video of the woolwax


lay plastic down EVERYWHERE
 

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Brucey
'17 3.6
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10,854 Posts
Discussion Starter #67
you need to use a high capacity compressor and heat that up un warm water first.

here is a video of the woolwax


lay plastic down EVERYWHERE
Wool wax looks appealing.

But the fluid film still might win out for me because I don't need to invest in a compressor, special equipment, etc.

Buy a couple spray cans and call it a day.
 

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This is the one I used and also a test report from the Canadian Military Collage.




 

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'10 3.6R Outback Limited, 2zr swapped Toyota Yaris track toy, '12 Mazda3 skyactive
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438 Posts
This is the one I used and also a test report from the Canadian Military Collage.




I have been a long term annual Krown customer and although I think Krown is a good product, like any product it is only as good as it is applied. I have always thought corrosion free was superior as per the report you posted above as well as Krown being so darn thin as per their change in formulations few years prior. It simply makes a mess and does not last on the under carriage.

I never had corrosion free applied as the only local place is Canadian tire and I will never bring my car into their shops.

This led me to finally purchase the proper equipment and do it it myself so I know it is done properly. I forked out the cash and purchased the professional gun with wands from the corrosion free website (they are located an hour from me).

I have now rust proofed 3 of my cars and will be doing my neighbour's truck. This stuff is very very finicky to apply if you do it in anything other then mid summer temps, but once you get everything sorted out it is a dream. Creeps well with absolutely zero dripping, it is weird how good this stuff it. Drove it through pouring rain a few times and is still clinging to the undercarriage.

I highly recommend this to anyone who want their cars to last 15-20 years like I do. I am confident my Subie will never rust any further then it's current state. I purposefully over applied this stuff since it was the first application. I will be doing it yearly each summer as opposed to every spring as it is easier to handle in higher temps.

FWIW I typically used about 3.5L on an outback and small sedan.
 

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2012 2.5 Outback Manual
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64 Posts
I just had a good look at Valerie's nether regions. She's starting to rust, but not much, at least not yet. There's some edge rust around the subframe. But I think if I don't soon do something to at least slow it, it will get worse, like a virus (see what I did there?)

I'd like to take her to a rustproofing place that can first remove the existing rust with angle grinders or whatever they use for that, and I'm cool with leaving her there for a couple of days to get that done right if needs be.

What I don't want to do is coat the existing rust with a rustproofing compound. I don't have a hoist to do it myself (and I really don't want do do it on my back) and I'd like to find a shop that can remove as much rust as possible before applying any kind of rustproofing. I'm wondering if anyone has any ideas. I'm in Toronto, give or take. Krown is the king shitz0r here, but they seem a bit too... retail, for what I'm looking for - I don't mind spending a few extra bucks.

I just detailed the car myself, and found rust in spots I didn't want to find it. Not bad rust, nothing that can't be stopped I think (spots like the door edges, the edges of the subframe, the edge of the tailgate, any side that's been spot welded, but just the start of rust), but nothing that I can stop myself. She's got 200k on her and unless the floors rot out, she'll last 500k - if I can keep the rust at bay and the engine running well.

So - for my fellow Canucks, and especially Ontarians (I'm GTA, but for the right shop I'll easily drive many hours), can you recommend a place that can do a decent job of removing the existing rust before applying a rust inhibitor?

And - for all you lesser folks😜... can you recommend any specific method to remove said rust? I can get under her on my back if I need to, but honestly, I'd rather pay someone to do that.

I'll be removing the engine shortly for a clutch replacement, if that makes any difference. I'm going to be (or my mechanic is going to be) replacing all the mounts and bolts.
 

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'10 3.6R Outback Limited, 2zr swapped Toyota Yaris track toy, '12 Mazda3 skyactive
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438 Posts
I just had a good look at Valerie's nether regions. She's starting to rust, but not much, at least not yet. There's some edge rust around the subframe. But I think if I don't soon do something to at least slow it, it will get worse, like a virus (see what I did there?)

I'd like to take her to a rustproofing place that can first remove the existing rust with angle grinders or whatever they use for that, and I'm cool with leaving her there for a couple of days to get that done right if needs be.

What I don't want to do is coat the existing rust with a rustproofing compound. I don't have a hoist to do it myself (and I really don't want do do it on my back) and I'd like to find a shop that can remove as much rust as possible before applying any kind of rustproofing. I'm wondering if anyone has any ideas. I'm in Toronto, give or take. Krown is the king shitz0r here, but they seem a bit too... retail, for what I'm looking for - I don't mind spending a few extra bucks.

I just detailed the car myself, and found rust in spots I didn't want to find it. Not bad rust, nothing that can't be stopped I think (spots like the door edges, the edges of the subframe, the edge of the tailgate, any side that's been spot welded, but just the start of rust), but nothing that I can stop myself. She's got 200k on her and unless the floors rot out, she'll last 500k - if I can keep the rust at bay and the engine running well.

So - for my fellow Canucks, and especially Ontarians (I'm GTA, but for the right shop I'll easily drive many hours), can you recommend a place that can do a decent job of removing the existing rust before applying a rust inhibitor?

And - for all you lesser folks😜... can you recommend any specific method to remove said rust? I can get under her on my back if I need to, but honestly, I'd rather pay someone to do that.

I'll be removing the engine shortly for a clutch replacement, if that makes any difference. I'm going to be (or my mechanic is going to be) replacing all the mounts and bolts.
IMO you would be chasing your tail and spending a lot of money doing so. If you have a good rust inhibitor that actually sticks (see my post above) then existing rust isn't an issue. The corrosion free product actually makes much of the rust "disappear" as it makes everything look wet.

By getting rid of the existing rust you will by effect be removing much the existing paint. This will end up leading to potentially more rust on any parts that are not perfectly coated. And if anyone who isn't you is coating the car, there will be missed spots.

If you are really set on removing existing rust then my recommendation in to properly do it and drop all the sub frames and wire wheel it all. Then coat it in POR-15.

This will get expensive quick bit really it is the only proper way to do it. I wouldn't worry about rust on seams, it is a given where we live. As long as you coat it yearly you will be good.

FWIW, I've often bought 10 year old used cars that were never rust proofed. I coat them as soon as I get them, and do so every year. At the 15 year mark they are not really any more rusty then when I bought them.

I don't know where in the GTA you are located but I coat cars for my friends/neighbours and treat them as if they were my own. I'm located out in Caledonia if you ever want to make the trip and have your car done.
 

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Brucey
'17 3.6
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10,854 Posts
Discussion Starter #72
The only way to properly do what you're wanting is completely disassemble the car, sand blast all components, and start over.

I cant imagine the cost involved. Rust loves to be where you can't get to it.

I would go for an oil based coating as mentioned above. I need to do a follow up video but my cheapy $12 fluid film absolutely worked and even stopped the existing rust that is on the car.

Pro places seem to go for Krown. I would recommend that.
 

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2019 Outback Limited, 3.6R, Abyss Blue
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188 Posts
Environmental vs Health concerns.

We live in such a strange world. In Canada, this is OK, but high fructose corn syrup isn't.

In the US, it's d*mn near impossible to find something without it. It's even in many things we market as being healthy. It's outlawed in most of the developed world. But not here, we like our corn juice. weather it be in the gas tank or the tummy. I wonder if high fructose corn syrup can be used a rust inhibitor? Or is it's sole purpose to make us fat?
This is because Iowa has the first caucus. HFCS and corn ethanol are widely used because of government subsidies (from you and me), mandates (laws) and politics. None of it is based on health, science, or god forbid common sense.
 
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