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2003 Outback L with 2.5L
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking into buying another outback as a project drift car, is there a way (complicated or not) to remove the power from the front wheels so that all power goes to rear. This being said, I have no issues with permanent changes. Thanks!
 

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2000 Outback 5MT
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Automatic? No. Manual? Yes and it's actually fairly easy.

The R160 rear diff isn't that strong though so you're probably going to blow it up at some point. Rear axles tend to give out as well. Both of these can be fixed by swapping the diff and axles (and now it doesn't matter what you put back there! YAY!) I've provided a link with some pictures of someone welding their center diff. The kind of neat part is that it's actually fairly simple to swap between AWD and RWD. I believe it's grimmspeed or some other company makes really nice front axle caps to seal off the now RWD tranny.

You'll need to take some front axles and take them apart and just stick the spindle/cup into the front hub (it's really light) so that you can keep your ABS. Also pretty easy procedure.

Thread with Pictures
 

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Why would you want a 4wd to be a two-wheel-drive? and rear-wheel at that - I thought rwd is always the most slippy and really doesn't have any advantage over front or awd? Just curious
 

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Why would you want a 4wd to be a two-wheel-drive? and rear-wheel at that - I thought rwd is always the most slippy and really doesn't have any advantage over front or awd? Just curious
....he said he wants a project drift car.

And AWD vs RWD vs FWD doesn't really make a difference for "slippy". That has more to do with the tires.
 

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2002 3.0 VDC Wag + 2018 2.5 Leg Ltd
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OBW H6 VDC, Tribeca, XT6
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Automatic? No.
Automatic is easier than manual, no transmission work required.

AT - cut the power wire (one wire) to the Duty C Solenoid so it's fully locking the transfer clutches at all times. (in 2003+ you would fully power the Duty C as it's operationally reverse from the previous 15 years of design.

MT - alternative to welding - get a borked diff/transmission with torque bind and use that, no need to weld.
keep looking and you'll find an MT Subaru being sold cheap because it needs a VLSD that's failed with torque bind. your work would be done for you.

remove front axles and disassemble outer CV's so you can bolt them back into the hubs/bearings.
 

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2000 Outback 5MT
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Automatic is easier than manual, no transmission work required.

AT - cut the power wire (one wire) to the Duty C Solenoid so it's fully locking the transfer clutches at all times. (in 2003+ you would fully power the Duty C as it's operationally reverse from the previous 15 years of design.
I can't imagine that 4EAT lasting long. Also an automatic is no bueno for drifting.
 

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2003 Outback L with 2.5L
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
yeah no i would be going manual. Thanks very much for the information Frogsthatmoo!! This is exactly what I was wanting to know!
 

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I can't imagine that 4EAT lasting long. Also an automatic is no bueno for drifting.
ha ha, indeed! but if he's already got one - why not start the easy way and blow it up!?

the rear clutch drum/hub will shear off. no big deal, then he can convert to FWD while he sources his MT bits, LOLOLOL
 

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pretty much! that's a good point that if he's racing/drifting, the AT rear transfer components would not hold up.
 

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pretty much! that's a good point that if he's racing/drifting, the AT rear transfer components would not hold up.

They could be made to stretch a bit...

Slippery dirt patch track, 4 temp spare tires from the junkyard and suddenly you've got nickel drift club.

You could gain a lot of experience and skill with hardly any money spent. Nice slow speeds to keep it safe without needing pricey safety gear.
 

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Possible? Yes, absolutely. It's been done hundreds, probably thousands of times. I first saw it done on an otherwise pretty stock GF Impreza about 12 years ago.


Exactly how you do it has a lot to do with exactly your goals. How much you want to spend, what you have at your disposal, how much power you want to make, how often you want to drift it, etc. Are you building a true competition drift car? Or just a drift-inspired street car?


The stock 5MTs (regardless of vintage) can easily be converted to RWD either with an aftermarket coupler, or just a welder. The transfer gears will likely be the first point to fail. I think there are several options for upgraded transfer gears.

6MTs can be modified as well, although the only real advantage, is simplicity of install. There are much cheaper and probably better options for a RWD only option.

A BRZ/FRS/GT86 transmission wouldn't be hard. Pretty strong, bolts up to an FA/FB/EJ/EZ/EG engine.

Bill Hincher makes an adapter to bolt a Toyota R- or W-series transmission to an FA/FB/EJ/EZ/EG engine. With a spacer and a different clutch disc, that also means Chrysler AX transmission (made by Aisin-warner, just like the Toyota options).

I've seen hand-made one-off adapters to several other transmissions.


And that's all assuming you're using a Subaru engine and production transmission. Virtually all high-level competition drift cars use complete aftermarket sequential transmissions, that are designed to be easily adapted to any engine. And a lot of them use other engines, for many reasons. Cost, familiarity, uniqueness (Mad Mikes 4-rotor Miata.....), size, weight, etc. etc.



Next challenge will be the rear diff. The stock r160 will not hold up to much. R180 (also probably not enough), r200, Ford 9" and more are common. Pretty much any IRS diff is possible with some fabrication. And a solid axle is possible with some more modification (although I don't know why you'd want to).
 
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