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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering how you would siphon fuel from the gas tank in and emergency. I can’t get a siphon hose down the fuel filler all the way to the tank. It would be nice to be able to use the gas in the tank to run my generator in an emergency.
Is their a line that is easily accessible and removable that you can let fuel drain from and then reconnect? I have heard of State Troopers modifying their cruisers with a T valve off a fuel line but not sure I want anything that modifies the current fuel line.
 

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I used to think it was because there was a screen in there to prevent gas theft, but then I was told many, if not all vehicles have a ball check valve in there to prevent gas from spilling should the vehicle flip. Not sure which is true and where it would be located, or what the best way is to get fuel out. I would imagine modifying the fuel line would be giving the dealer an excuse to not cover any fuel related issues.
 

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Do a Google search for "siphon fuel from car" -- lots of hits with explanations and ideas.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I know how to siphon. I just cant get past what ever is blocking the gas filler neck. I was looking for ideas on the best way to move gas from the outback tank for use in a generator or another car. Is it easier to remove a gas line from the tank or somewhere close to the engine and pump gas that way?
 

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The cars are generally designed to preclude what your looking to do. There's simply no quick and easy way (i.e., without varying degrees of dis-assembly etc) to gain access to the fuel in the tank.

Far easier to keep an approved fuel container handy for use with a generator, or drive it to a gas station to provide fuel for another car.
 

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How about the output side from the fuel filter, thru a piece of fuel line long enough to reach a can on the ground?

You could cycle the key to the on (not cranking) position to run the fuel pump for a few seconds, and do this repeatedly.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have heard of some state troopers who used a "T" valve off one of the fuel lines and used the output to fill ups stranded cars. I am not sure if their car was kept running and excess fuel not needed by the car was pumped. My VW had a return line from the engine compartment to the gas tank and excess fuel not needed was sent back to the tank.:cool:
 

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I have never seen a modern patrol car with a T valve or other way of pumping gas to stranded vehicles. The modern solution is to transport the driver to the nearest gas station, let them buy a gallon or two of gas, and then transport them back to their vehicle. Or, a Trooper will just keep a gallon in his trunk (but not too many Troopers do this). Most often, the driver of the vehicle will already have a friend coming with gas thanks to cell phones.

Keep in mind, modern fuel pumps put out 60+ psi or even more with newer direct injection systems. It isn't too wise to go splicing into factory fuel lines with that much pressure. Gone are the days of simple rubber fuel lines and hose clamps.

Edited to Add: Most newer vehicles are siphon resistant so good luck!
 

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All cars are required to have a check valve that prevents fuel from spilling out filler neck in the event of an accident or roll-over. On the few I have seen taken apart during post crash investigation it looks like you could get a small hose to push past the check valve and into the fuel. I don't know if the check valve would give any hang-up trying to retrieve the hose when finished.

One other method is following the shop manual for draining through the tank when the tank needs service (method 3 is for when the fuel pump won't work). See attached.
 

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In an emergency - you would simply disconnect the fuel line from the tank. Or in one case we had someone simply stick their hunting knife through the bottom of our gas tank and drain it that way. Of course it made for a difficult trip out of the mountains for us when we got back to the car after being in the back country for two weeks.
 

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The fuel tanks has baffles in it that prevent a hose from reaching the gas. I think this is the norm with modern fuel tanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
While sticking a sharp object in the fuel tank sounds like an attractive option, it appears the procedure described as option #3 seems like it might leave the car more servicable after the emergency. :) Wonder if you could not use option #2 to use the car's fuel pump and pump the fuel out into a container.
 

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While sticking a sharp object in the fuel tank sounds like an attractive option, it appears the procedure described as option #3 seems like it might leave the car more servicable after the emergency. :) Wonder if you could not use option #2 to use the car's fuel pump and pump the fuel out into a container.
They clearly needed the fuel for their car and didnt care that we were 2hrs up a logging rd. Lol Given we had checked in with the local ranger station and they check this trail head once a week they knew it was our car that dumped gas on the ground and when we were due to surface back at the car. Ranger met us at the car told us our tank was knifed and they had a service truck bringing up a flatbed trailer to haul us out. The advantages of being nice to park rangers and stopping by the station on the way to remote areas. They do care and look out for people. Lol
 
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