Subaru Outback Forums banner

Should Ironman cover the cost for removal of the incorrec lift and installation of the correct lift?

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Premium Member
2022 Subaru Outback Wilderness
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Well, the title certainly explains how this Monday is going. I received my Ironman 4x4 Spec C lift kit a couple of weekends back, and went to have a friend who just opened a new shop install the kit for me. Unfortunately, I can't install it as I have a back and a shoulder injury that prevent me from this type of work. Just installing my new wheels nearly put me in bed for a day. Anyway, I took my son on a trip to the mountains and realized for a lift with 660 lbs of additional payload, we were really sagging in the back.

Today, I called up Ironman and spoke with "Bubba" and he confirmed they shipped me the wrong suspension. Now, they're going to send the correct one, but they wont do anything regarding the $600 of installation I had to pay, and will get the opportunity to pay again. I could understand this if they provided the information the customer would need to determine if they had the right parts to install, but the invoice I was sent only had one number on it for a "kit" and didn't list out the individual parts (FR, FL, RR, RL etc) so there was no way for me to know that the kit I received wasn't Spec C.

What are your thoughts? The non Spec C lift rode amazing. I need Spec C and will cover the cost of reinstallation. But, in a situation like this, do you think the business has some culpability in the incurred installation costs? I can't in good conscious recommend Ironman any longer if they aren't willing to make a situation completely right, and if they're sending incorrect kits out the door.

Would love to hear your thoughts. Don't forget to vote at the top of the page!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
1,983 Posts
Well this is a bummer...

Are both kits the same price? Either answer, ask for a rebate/discounted/partial refund...

Do you have to send the wrong kit back? Or yours to keep? If the latter, then there's a simple solution.

C.
 

·
Premium Member
2022 Subaru Outback Wilderness
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well this is a bummer...

Are both kits the same price? Either answer, ask for a rebate/discounted/partial refund...

Do you have to send the wrong kit back? Or yours to keep? If the latter, then there's a simple solution.

C.
Both kits would be the same price, and I definitely paid for the other kit according to the invoice. They made mention of sending the wrong kit back, but honestly, if they're not willing to cover the cost of the installation, I'm not sure that is going to happen. I guess if they dont send me a label to return the kit I have now, and they dont cover the re-install cost, I could sell this kit for $600 and call it a day - it'd be good for me and a steal for anyone else. Ultimately it raised the vehicle 2" and rode amazingly, but I need the additional payload for the plans I have.
 

·
Registered
2018 3.6R 1" lift with Flatout GR Plus
Joined
·
312 Posts
Sorry to hear about your shoulder injury. So if you are not planning on sending it back, you have 1 extra kit now, which is more than the cost of the install plus re-install, that means you are better off.

To be honest the same happened to me with Flatout and I have swallowed all the costs - they are my problem, not theirs, I should've checked all the parts before installing them but my situation was even harder because there was a manufacturing defect that I discovered only after the installation (and 2 or 3 re-installations and half a year of test driving).

What's the difference between the kits, isn't it only the springs? You know the hardest part of the work had been done so the springs re-install would be maybe $200-300.
 

·
Premium Member
2020 Onyx
Joined
·
17,076 Posts
In general the parts supplier's liability is just for providing the correct parts and sucking up the cost of re-shipping and return shipping, but ideally a company goes beyond what they're "obligated" to do, to "make it right".

Not sure if your credit card company can get involved in a dispute like this.
 

·
Premium Member
2022 Subaru Outback Wilderness
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sorry to hear about your shoulder injury. So if you are not planning on sending it back, you have 1 extra kit now, which is more than the cost of the install plus re-install, that means you are better off.

To be honest the same happened to me with Flatout and I have swallowed all the costs - they are my problem, not theirs, I should've checked all the parts before installing them but my situation was even harder because there was a manufacturing defect that I discovered only after the installation (and 2 or 3 re-installations and half a year of test driving).

What's the difference between the kits, isn't it only the springs? You know the hardest part of the work had been done so the springs re-install would be maybe $200-300.
I actually messaged my mechanic with "it happened again" and he just laughed. This same thing happened to me with a Volkswagen kit. My mechanic has already said he wont charge me to remove this and reinstall the correct one, but it's not his problem to fix. I'm hoping I can get Ironman to compensate him directly for the added trouble. If not, in the end, I will certainly cover the costs to make sure my mechanic can feed his family and continue to be the best darn mechanic I've ever met. :)

In general the parts supplier's liability is just for providing the correct parts and sucking up the cost of re-shipping and return shipping, but ideally a company goes beyond what they're "obligated" to do, to "make it right".

Not sure if your credit card company can get involved in a dispute like this.
I've definitely had this thought, and considered if I want to fight it legally. Do I have a leg to stand on? Probably. Actually with everything I have I have a pretty good basis for a small claim. But, I have such a hectic life already I dont need the extra stress. In the end, I'll cover the cost that Ironman wont, and I'll just be vocal when anyone asks me about my lift. Is it a quality lift? It sure seems like it. Would I recommend purchasing from Ironman? Absolutely not, at this point.
 

·
Premium Member
2020 Onyx
Joined
·
17,076 Posts
If it were a giant company like Rock Auto or Amazon wrong parts being sent are in a way more forgivable than a small company that only ships their own stuff. Mistakes can happen to anyone but if I were a small company like this I'd bend over backwards to make things right and make sure this kind of thing doesn't happen again. These days forums and social media amplify the results of a company making a mistake and how they handle it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bikewagn and 1werd

·
Premium Member
2022 Subaru Outback Wilderness
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If it were a giant company like Rock Auto or Amazon wrong parts being sent are in a way more forgivable than a small company that only ships their own stuff. Mistakes can happen to anyone but if I were a small company like this I'd bend over backwards to make things right and make sure this kind of thing doesn't happen again. These days forums and social media amplify the results of a company making a mistake and how they handle it.
So very true. I'm nobody special, but I work just as hard for my money as anyone else does, and the mistake wasn't mine, unless you consider giving them my business the mistake. In the end, I hope they make it right so that I can share a different narrative about the type of company I perceive it to be. Time will tell....
 

·
On the Super Mod Squad
2002 3.0 VDC Wag + 2018 2.5 Leg Ltd
Joined
·
27,786 Posts
If it were a giant company like Rock Auto or Amazon wrong parts being sent are in a way more forgivable than a small company that only ships their own stuff. Mistakes can happen to anyone but if I were a small company like this I'd bend over backwards to make things right and make sure this kind of thing doesn't happen again. These days forums and social media amplify the results of a company making a mistake and how they handle it.
agreed,...like LLBean and the original hand made boots. leaky that needed to be re-sealed, and were.

@Brucey might want to read this thread.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SilverOnyx

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
Once you receive the correct lift kit and before sending back the wrong 1, I would call back and escalate your issue to someone higher in their customer service department, to see if they come up with a more reasonable/fair resolution.. IMO, if the paper trail shows they truly sent you the wrong part, they should be liable for the time or $ you spent installing the wrong part..

How did you pay? (CC, PayPal, etc?) You may be able to initiate a claim and get a mediator between you and Ironman to come up with a fair resolution.. I have used PayPal resolution center a few times, they are usually pretty fair.
 

·
Registered
2018 - 2.5i
Joined
·
182 Posts
Generally it's the responsibility of the person installing to verify if the parts are correct before doing the install.
 

·
Premium Member
2022 Subaru Outback Wilderness
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Generally it's the responsibility of the person installing to verify if the parts are correct before doing the install.
I do not disagree with you, but on the documentation I was sent, and the invoice, there are no part numbers to verify correct parts. I am not sure how I, or any other customer, would have been able to verify the parts were correct.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
837 Posts
Both kits would be the same price, and I definitely paid for the other kit according to the invoice. They made mention of sending the wrong kit back, but honestly, if they're not willing to cover the cost of the installation, I'm not sure that is going to happen. I guess if they dont send me a label to return the kit I have now, and they dont cover the re-install cost, I could sell this kit for $600 and call it a day - it'd be good for me and a steal for anyone else. Ultimately it raised the vehicle 2" and rode amazingly, but I need the additional payload for the plans I have.
Difference is, they aren't legally required to. I'm guessing there could be legal consequences for you not shipping the wrong parts back.
 

·
Premium Member
01 VDC, 05 R Sedan, 06 BAJA EJ257
Joined
·
17,889 Posts
In this business of auto repair, there are avenues to make a labor cost claim with any supplier or manufacturer. We do it alot when a part is installed and it is crap at the get go. Most times it's electronics that can't be fully tested prior to installation, or a reman trans/engine from the dealerships. Since the techs are paid flag rates, if a tech has to go back in to replace a manufacturer's or supplier's part due to the part being faulty, and sometimes that's quite a bit of time, like engines and transmissions, then the supplier is paying the labor. However the supplier gets their money is on them, but I'm sure it goes up the chain and they get reimbursed by the manufacturer.

This thread deals with the wrong kit being shipped under a shipping label that it's the kit that was ordered. Someone in shipping wasn't paying attention. Clearly a fault with Ironman's shipping department.

Kit part numbers will be different from the individual part numbers. So if the kit part number list does not provide the individual part numbers that are supposed to be in the kit, then this is another fault of Ironman that makes it impossible to verify correct parts are in the kit. But, being able to go back in Ironman for sending wrong parts would be dependent on the kit part number that is on the box you opened. If the box had the Spec C kit number, and the parts inside were not Spec C, then you have an advantage and recourse. If the kit part number on the box was not what you ordered, then they can say you were inattentive and should have contacted them prior to installing the wrong set. Doesn't matter what is on a shipping label and paperwork. It matters that someone checked the numbers on the part/kit container to make sure the part puller shipped the correct part prior to taking a car apart to install the parts.

To me it's an everyday thing. Check, verify parts delivery. Parts are dropped off all day from at least 20 different companies/dealerships in town plus FedEx, UPS, and slow post. The quicker the parts are verified as correct, the quicker the car gets repaired and moved out. If there's a problem, phone calls are made to rectify the part issue.

People at home get their orders, are excited their new toys have arrived and will miss the little things. It's understandable.

If you can backtrack, check the shipping box numbers with the invoice, then you may be able to push it with Ironman. Otherwise, post the current kit up on Craigslist or eBay and call it a day.
 

·
Registered
2017 2.5i Premium Lapis Blue
Joined
·
5,226 Posts
Cases like this are why it is generally a bad idea for shops to let the customer provide the parts. If the shop had ordered the parts they might have a little more influence in getting the vendor to make things right, especially if they regularly order parts from them. The complaint of a single customer just doesn't carry that much of a threat. Hopefully Ironman will step up to the plate and make things right if it is escalated to someone with the authority to make the call.
 

·
Registered
2021 MGM Outback 2.5i Premium with Tungsten Grey seats
Joined
·
3,681 Posts
If the box had the Spec C kit number, and the parts inside were not Spec C, then you have an advantage and recourse. If the kit part number on the box was not what you ordered, then they can say you were inattentive and should have contacted them prior to installing the wrong set.
I would be curious about this as well.
 

·
Registered
2012 Outback Ltd 3.6r
Joined
·
661 Posts
Hate to state the obvious, however, the customer has the responsibility to confirm they've received the correct part, prior to installing. - If the kit was incorrect, I would have thought the installer may have also caught the mistake. On occasion, I've received parts from a variety of sources, including Amazon, which didn't match what was ordered, when checking the received item.

My view is by replacing the kit, they've made good on their mistake, once they pay to ship the incorrect item back, unless they say not to bother. Unfortunately, it was the shop and/or your error to install the kit without verifying it was the correct kit. I'm sure that isn't going to be everyone's view.

From the shop's perspective, they installed the parts you provided, which sort of relieves them from responsibility as well. although just maybe they'll give discount on the replacement work, or hopefully might offer to help, given it's repeat business to them?

Was the original kit for another year/model, or was it actually correct for your 2022 Wilderness Edition?
 

·
Premium Member
2020 Onyx
Joined
·
17,076 Posts
I always verify part numbers but

@bikewagn said:
...on the documentation I was sent, and the invoice, there are no part numbers to verify correct parts. I am not sure how I, or any other customer, would have been able to verify the parts were correct.
So it could have been simply the wrong spring rates on the coils, which may have had part numbers on them but no reference where he could see which springs are supposed to be with which kit.

For example when I buy a KYB quick strut I check the number on the box but I don't check to see if the spring on it is correct. There's a certain amount of checking that one should do but it shouldn't require examining each component of an assembly or every single part of a kit to make sure each and every part is correct - but making sure you have all the parts is standard.
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top