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Subaru Outback Premium, 2.5 litre 2019 model
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Folks
I am travelling from Melbourne to Kalgoorlie, then into the Goldfields of Western Australia with some off road travelling, so lots of kilometers especially across the Nullarbor.
If I was to need spares that might let me down, can anyone suggest what I might need on board should I break down. I am in a 2019 Outback 2.5 litre Premium.
One does not expect a failure but it best to be sure just in case.
cheers
 

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1999 Outback Limited Manual EJ25
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86 Posts
Tyres are the first thing to think about. Carry a tyre repair kit and consider a second spare if going remote.
With a vehicle that new you probably don't need to worry about spare radiator hoses but I'd consider spare fanbelts, plus fitting a UHF radio if going far from mobile phone coverage.
You can pretty much take a Subaru apart with three spanners - 10, 12 & 14mm. I always travel with spanner and socket sets which have mostly been used to assist other people. The wheel brace that came with my old Outback is pretty feeble so I got a proper one.
Otherwise all the standard stuff - first aid, water, recovery strap or tow rope, block of wood to stand the jack on, small tarp, gloves, blankets, duct tape, cable ties, shovel, etc.

The standard Nullarbor crossing isn't remote, and as it's long been sealed it's an easy drive. I saw veteran cars doing it 20 years ago.
 

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2010 2.5 CVT Premium
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1,092 Posts
Generally speaking, your car is too new for any impending wear-out failures so any breakdowns you might encounter would be a random part failure. About the only thing I have seen recurring on those newer models is windshield cracking but it is impractical to bring a spare windshield and the means to install it. The factory battery is other item that plagues OBs for the past 10 years. Have a jump pack or replace the battery before you go.

I'd echo what Moblet posted about being prepared for a tire failure. Having a full size spare is essential when traveling in remote areas since the space saver spare is only supposed to be run for ~80km (do you all get full size spare tires in AUS anyway?). To back that up, a means to make a tire repair and an inflator would be a compromise to a second spare.

Other than that, some extra motor oil, coolant, spare fuses would be about it. Maybe spare batteries for the key remote? (not critical).
If you plan on driving at night time and have incandescent headlights (I can't keep up with what year/trim level has what), some spare bulbs/capsules would be smart to bring along.
 

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Subaru Outback Premium, 2.5 litre 2019 model
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Discussion Starter #4
Tyres are the first thing to think about. Carry a tyre repair kit and consider a second spare if going remote.
With a vehicle that new you probably don't need to worry about spare radiator hoses but I'd consider spare fanbelts, plus fitting a UHF radio if going far from mobile phone coverage.
You can pretty much take a Subaru apart with three spanners - 10, 12 & 14mm. I always travel with spanner and socket sets which have mostly been used to assist other people. The wheel brace that came with my old Outback is pretty feeble so I got a proper one.
Otherwise all the standard stuff - first aid, water, recovery strap or tow rope, block of wood to stand the jack on, small tarp, gloves, blankets, duct tape, cable ties, shovel, etc.

The standard Nullarbor crossing isn't remote, and as it's long been sealed it's an easy drive. I saw veteran cars doing it 20 years ago.
Good info thx.
 

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Subaru Outback Premium, 2.5 litre 2019 model
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Discussion Starter #5
Generally speaking, your car is too new for any impending wear-out failures so any breakdowns you might encounter would be a random part failure. About the only thing I have seen recurring on those newer models is windshield cracking but it is impractical to bring a spare windshield and the means to install it. The factory battery is other item that plagues OBs for the past 10 years. Have a jump pack or replace the battery before you go.

I'd echo what Moblet posted about being prepared for a tire failure. Having a full size spare is essential when traveling in remote areas since the space saver spare is only supposed to be run for ~80km (do you all get full size spare tires in AUS anyway?). To back that up, a means to make a tire repair and an inflator would be a compromise to a second spare.

Other than that, some extra motor oil, coolant, spare fuses would be about it. Maybe spare batteries for the key remote? (not critical).
If you plan on driving at night time and have incandescent headlights (I can't keep up with what year/trim level has what), some spare bulbs/capsules would be smart to bring along.
cheers. Spare tyre is full wheel in Oz.
 

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MY17 Outback Diesel Premium
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83 Posts
As per above. Water and Basic tool kit.

How far are you going off road? Remote areas? The further you go = more water as it may be a day or two till some one finds you (so some nibbles, and something to keep you warm overnight). If you are going a long way off road into remote areas, consider a second spare, but a tire puncture repair kit and an air compressor is a good purchase. UHF radio can help get you out of trouble, but get a long antenna as a spare (you can have a short antenna fitted for local coms, but have a longer one to fit if you get stuck somewhere and need the extra range). I tend to carry a clear shower curtain (or clear heavy duty plastic sheet) with duct tape as an emergency window replacement (rocks flicked up by other cars) when travelling a lot on dirt roads (haven't needed it yet). Recovery strap.

If you are considering driving at night, then a nudge bar with driving lights is very worthwhile, although putting LED bulbs into the high beam headlights may be a good compromise (depending on how road legal the LED bulbs are).
 

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1999 Outback Limited Manual EJ25
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Oh and fan belts are pretty much gone nowaday. Electric fans for cooling now. But there is a large engine type belt I see.
Yes, I think they're called drive belts now but I used the term fanbelt so you'd know exactly what I meant. Mine has two shortish belts but yours may have a long "serpentine" one. The alternator is spun by a drive belt (along with the power steering and A/C pumps) so a belt failure will leave you stranded. Your newish belt is unlikely to fail but if it suffers slippage for any reason it can wear very quickly. Whenever checking oil and water also check that the belt tension is OK and that there isn't excessive worn rubber residue on it.
 

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Subaru Outback Premium, 2.5 litre 2019 model
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Discussion Starter #9
As per above. Water and Basic tool kit.

How far are you going off road? Remote areas? The further you go = more water as it may be a day or two till some one finds you (so some nibbles, and something to keep you warm overnight). If you are going a long way off road into remote areas, consider a second spare, but a tire puncture repair kit and an air compressor is a good purchase. UHF radio can help get you out of trouble, but get a long antenna as a spare (you can have a short antenna fitted for local coms, but have a longer one to fit if you get stuck somewhere and need the extra range). I tend to carry a clear shower curtain (or clear heavy duty plastic sheet) with duct tape as an emergency window replacement (rocks flicked up by other cars) when travelling a lot on dirt roads (haven't needed it yet). Recovery strap.

If you are considering driving at night, then a nudge bar with driving lights is very worthwhile, although putting LED bulbs into the high beam headlights may be a good compromise (depending on how road legal the LED bulbs are).
The off road driving is in to mining tenements and most roads in are reasonable. Have done this trip a few years back so know what to take re survival etc. Had a Landcruiser then!
 

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MY17 Outback Diesel Premium
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No problem. It is hard to tell what anyone's experience level is like. Plenty of people heading out for the first time and woefully under prepared.
 
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