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Sorry if this has already discussed. The 2020 Onyx comes with fulll sized spare. Anyone know if the 2020 Touring has a full sized or space saver. And I therefore assume the 2019 OBs have the space saver donut too then?
 

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And while we are at it - does the Onyx have an actual fifth alloy wheel on its spare? Or full size, with a tire matching the other four, but on a steel wheel?
 

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2019 2.5i Limited Forester (hers) (4th Subie), 2014 Impreza Premium (mine)(#5)
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Sorry if this has already discussed. The 2020 Onyx comes with fulll sized spare. Anyone know if the 2020 Touring has a full sized or space saver. And I therefore assume the 2019 OBs have the space saver donut too then?
The Onyx will be the only car with a full sized spare, on a regular alloy wheel. So all you have to do if you have a flat is swap the tire and you're ready to go. However, the spare does NOT have a TPMS sensor in it, so you WILL have to monitor it with a real tire gauge.

All other vehicles will be temporary spares. A full sized spare WILL fit into the hole, but if you do so, the foam compartment will NOT fit then and you'll have to get an Onyx edition foam tool holder or something else.
 

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2020 Subaru Outback Onyx Edition XT (w/ $1,845 Optnl pkg & $4,555 of accessories) Ordered 12/9/2019
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The Onyx will be the only car with a full sized spare, on a regular alloy wheel. So all you have to do if you have a flat is swap the tire and you're ready to go. However, the spare does NOT have a TPMS sensor in it, so you WILL have to monitor it with a real tire gauge.

All other vehicles will be temporary spares. A full sized spare WILL fit into the hole, but if you do so, the foam compartment will NOT fit then and you'll have to get an Onyx edition foam tool holder or something else.
I was told by the dealer that the 2020 Subaru Outback 2.4T Onyx XT's Full Size Spare will have a TPMS Sensor. That doesn't mean this information is correct. Do have a definitive source for the information?

Edit, I will be at the dealer ordering my car tomorrow. I will inspect the spare wheel on an in stock Onyx. The parts guy said I can tell by feeling and moving the valve stem, there is a metal tube inside the valve, only with tires that have the TPMS sensors.
 

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Subaru would be smart to sell the "full sized wheel spare", as an option, I think.
I sure would've sprung for the better setup, and that "package" would've come with the correct foam fitment, seems like a no-brainer to me (so does just putting in at least a basic steel spare though, if there's room for one, can it really be that much cheaper for one of those cheesy spares, when you're buying millions of the other-real wheels/tires?).
 

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2020 Subaru Outback Onyx Edition XT (w/ $1,845 Optnl pkg & $4,555 of accessories) Ordered 12/9/2019
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So few cars have room for a Full sized spare, My current Chrysler car has no room for a spare at all... My last car had a "Full Sized Spare" but it really wasn't an actual Full sized spare wouldn't fit. I am looking forward to the security of having the full sized spare.
 

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Subaru would be smart to sell the "full sized wheel spare", as an option, I think.
The standard tire is a “full size” spare (at least on the touring XT that I own.) It is however a “temporary“ spare and not intended for extended use.
 

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Edit, I will be at the dealer ordering my car tomorrow. I will inspect the spare wheel on an in stock Onyx. The parts guy said I can tell by feeling and moving the valve stem, there is a metal tube inside the valve, only with tires that have the TPMS sensors.
Did you determine whether the Onyx's full size spare has TPMS or not? Everyone (including me) says it doesn't have TPMS but I haven't verified it myself physically. I wonder if it you were to install TPMS on the spare, it would a fifth sensor throw off the system?
 

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The standard tire is a “full size” spare (at least on the touring XT that I own.) It is however a “temporary“ spare and not intended for extended use.
Yep. sometimes referred to as a "full height spare". It's not really the same size as the other tires. Because of this it is VERY important to understand where to place the spare if you get a flat. This is one of those areas where you really need to read the manual (Onyx people, you're fine).

475303
 

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Yep. sometimes referred to as a "full height spare". It's not really the same size as the other tires. Because of this it is VERY important to understand where to place the spare if you get a flat. This is one of those areas where you really need to read the manual (Onyx people, you're fine).

View attachment 475303
Yeah, good information. It's the same for previous models, I actually attached a note to the spare tire (printout of the manual page) as a reminder, because 2 years down the road I will not remember when I have a flat somewhere in the middle of nowhere at night during a snowstorm.

Does anybody know why you can only use the spare on the rear? It's kind of inconvenient when you have a flat up front .... I was always curious about the reason.
 

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2020 Subaru Outback Onyx Edition XT (w/ $1,845 Optnl pkg & $4,555 of accessories) Ordered 12/9/2019
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Did you determine whether the Onyx's full size spare has TPMS or not? Everyone (including me) says it doesn't have TPMS but I haven't verified it myself physically. I wonder if it you were to install TPMS on the spare, it would a fifth sensor throw off the system?
I followed the instructions of the parts guy. He told me to "feel the valve stem, you should be able to feel the metal tube inside if there is a TPMS sensor". I could not tell any difference from the way the Spare valve felt compared to the one on the car. The valve felt as though there could be some metal tube inside. As was previously stated, it is indeed a regular Alloy wheel like the other 4.

I did find out that each sensor needs to be reprogrammed after rotation. This is done with a two part device, one part plugs into the OBDII connection under the dash and the other part wirelessly connects to "register" each wheel as to its location. This tells me that having a 5th TPMS sensor shouldn't be a problem. At some point after the new tire is on the Sensor can be registered. Each sensor shipped has a unique code, just like any RFID technology device. Rotating with all 5 tires is critical. If one should need to be replaced at 30,000 miles. If you are rotating with all 5 you would only need to replace the spare, and then only rotate with the 4 older tires. If you only rotated with 4 tires, one bad tire, means all have to be replaced. I will be having all 5 tires replaced with more versatile All-season tires, ones that also are rated for "severe snow conditions". At the time I do this I will totally understand the TPMS system. I will add A TPMS sensor if one doesn't exist. The system has to work when parked next to other Subarus, so, an extra TPMS sensor couldn't possibly cause a problem. It is only a one way communication. I may buy the device to register these TPMS sensor with the receiver. When I have more information I will post.

Summary:
  • I am not 100% Sure the Full sized spare comes with the TMPS sensor, I'm maybe 85% sure.
  • I am 100% sure that adding one to the full sized spare will not be a problem.
  • Rotating with the full sized spare is important to maintain one extra with a similar tread depth in the case of a destroyed tire.
  • Purchasing the device to program the TPMS system is possible.
  • When rotating tires the TPMS system always needs to be reprogrammed.
 

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Summary:
  • I am not 100% Sure the Full sized spare comes with the TMPS sensor, I'm maybe 85% sure.
  • I am 100% sure that adding one to the full sized spare will not be a problem.
  • Rotating with the full sized spare is important to maintain one extra with a similar tread depth in the case of a destroyed tire.
  • Purchasing the device to program the TPMS system is possible.
  • When rotating tires the TPMS system always needs to be reprogrammed.
Great write-up! Thanks - learning a lot from this, especially the reprogramming part. Sure complicates things for DIY.
 

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Yeah, good information. It's the same for previous models, I actually attached a note to the spare tire (printout of the manual page) as a reminder, because 2 years down the road I will not remember when I have a flat somewhere in the middle of nowhere at night during a snowstorm.

Does anybody know why you can only use the spare on the rear? It's kind of inconvenient when you have a flat up front .... I was always curious about the reason.
The full sized spare that comes with the Onyx can be used up front, the temporary wheel cannot. Always rotate with the full size spare. Have a tread depth gauge, (very inexpensive), to verify the treads on each tire are within spec of each other(**I believe they need to be within 2/32"(1.6 mm) of each other,). You can wait until you get home to check the tread depth. The temporary spare (Donut) should not be used on the front wheels on any vehicle, your cornering would become unstable. At the very least, I would upgrade to the full sized spare. Buying it would actually save you money if you rotated with it and at some point one was destroyed, though your new spare couldn't be rotated with the rest until the other 4 were replaced at the end of their life, or you destroyed another tire and had to replace the remaining 3 as well.

Also, I carry a torque wrench with me in case of a flat tire. Most 16 year old boys can't easily over-torque their lug nuts, most 21 years olds can. For most of us over-torquing is a bigger problem. Many mechanics say they can tell what torque they are putting even without using the torque wrench. I am not one of those people.

Unless you are buying tires for someone that is totally incompetent and would drive on a rim that has lost its tire, I would stay away from Run-Flats!

References:
**From another forum: Subaru expects that all four tires are the same make and model and states that the tires must be similarly sized with no greater difference in tread depth than 2/32” which is more easily measured than the circumference.
 

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Also, I carry a torque wrench with me in case of a flat tire. Most 16 year old boys can't easily over-torque their lug nuts, most 21 years olds can. For most of us over-torquing is a bigger problem. Many mechanics say they can tell what torque they are putting even without using the torque wrench. I am not one of those.

Unless you are buying tires for someone that is totally incompetent and would drive on a rim that has lost its tire, I would stay away from Run-Flats!
You'e so good. Engineer?
 

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My dealer wants $410 for a rim for the 2020 touring with a tpms but no tire I don if that’s a good price or not I will be going with 5 Falken tires instead of the stock.
 

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2020 Subaru Outback Onyx Edition XT (w/ $1,845 Optnl pkg & $4,555 of accessories) Ordered 12/9/2019
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My dealer wants $410 for a rim for the 2020 touring with a tpms but no tire I don if that’s a good price or not I will be going with 5 Falken tires instead of the stock.
Search everywhere, you'll probably find a discount Subaru Parts Department Online. If you can get the part number from your parts dept. that might help.
 

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That's "quite the process" to get a front-flat replaced then.
1. Loosen lugs a bit (just on the wheel-in-progress), and jack up the back.
2. Remove rear wheel, and replace with the spare.
3. Lower rear, Jack up the front.
4. Replace the (flat) front with the rear you just removed.

Probably want to reverse them, too, after you get it fixed, unless you're more diligent than most, and your tires are regularly rotated/worn.

Not saying it's an "impossible feat" or anything, it's just a LOT of time on the roadside, in the cold/heat/rain/dark/traffic, I almost never get a flat in a "great place" ;-]
They should put a big, plastic sign, on top of the spare (or maybe just a really big, bright sticker on the foam housing, something though), denoting the "rear use ONLY" nature of the spare (for all but the Onyx, sigh...).
 

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Most people dont change their tires themselves. I do, but I have changed other tires for people who I was very surprised had no idea how to change a tire. I wonder if the road assistance crews (here in LA there are the ones on the freeways during rush hour, AAA, or whoever) follow that rear tire thing?
 
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