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2015 Outback Limited 2.5i - eyesight
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Discussion Starter #1
This bulletin (NUMBER: 07-90-15, DATE: 04/22/15) provides a new repair procedure for when the SRVD warning lamp is illuminated and DTC B2350 is stored in memory. The cause has been identified as a communication error between the SRVD radar units and the CAN transceiver triggered by a voltage drop which occurs during engine cranking.


Well, well, well. Could it be the JUNK batteries that Subaru puts in these cars? Every one of the batteries that I have ever seen under the hood leaks electrolyte and the hold down bracket has corroded. (GO LOOK AT YOURS) Realize that during cranking with a defective battery the CAN BUS voltage could drop from the expected 5 volt level and thus latch the DTC B2350. Is this why the expensive replacement radar sensors operate at a lower voltage of 3.3 volts? I know that it seems stupid, but Subaru is stupid. The JUNK batteries need to go first. Don't get me started on the JUNK tires.
 

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2016 Outback Premium 2.5 CVT w/EyeSight+SRVD
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7,252 Posts
... Subaru is stupid. The JUNK batteries need to go first. Don't get me started on the JUNK tires.
Sounds like Subaru is not the car for you. You always have other options.
 

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Registered
2015 Outback Limited 2.5i - eyesight
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2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Sounds like Subaru is not the car for you. You always have other options.
Oh? I have owned three of these cars and have had tire and battery issues with every one of them. Safe tires and a reliable battery are not too much to ask for. Well trained and honest service departments aren't too much to ask for either.
 

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Premium Member
2018 Outback 2.5i Touring
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315 Posts
This bulletin (NUMBER: 07-90-15, DATE: 04/22/15) provides a new repair procedure for when the SRVD warning lamp is illuminated and DTC B2350 is stored in memory. The cause has been identified as a communication error between the SRVD radar units and the CAN transceiver triggered by a voltage drop which occurs during engine cranking.


Well, well, well. Could it be the JUNK batteries that Subaru puts in these cars? Every one of the batteries that I have ever seen under the hood leaks electrolyte and the hold down bracket has corroded. (GO LOOK AT YOURS) Realize that during cranking with a defective battery the CAN BUS voltage could drop from the expected 5 volt level and thus latch the DTC B2350. Is this why the expensive replacement radar sensors operate at a lower voltage of 3.3 volts? I know that it seems stupid, but Subaru is stupid. The JUNK batteries need to go first. Don't get me started on the JUNK tires.
The OEM batteries are NOT top performers by any stretch of the imagination. But I am coming around to the view that battery / charge / reserve issues in new Gen 5's were less about the battery itself and more about the programming that did some weird stuff (supposedly chasing fuel efficiency) -- like not running the electronics / actively charging even with the engine running, unless maybe you turned on the defroster or other non-intuitive and wasteful activities. Imagine you're hanging out to pick someone up and you're 10 minutes early, so you keep the car idling while playing the radio; except that keeping the car running did nothing to help the drain on reserves. Check out this interesting post: https://www.subaruoutback.org/forum...489-observations-battery-charging-scheme.html It is speculation, yes, but pretty interesting, especially since the drop to below 14V while engine running no longer appears to be the case in 2018. Happy to be wrong, and not defending the OEM battery as a high performer, but it may not just be a poor battery choice.

(And why the "well, well, well" for a TSB issued in 2015? Did I misinterpret your post as an intended "aha" moment?)
 
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