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2015 Outback Limited 2.5 with E/S, Lapis Blue
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I'm curious about something: are there structural differences in a Gen5 Outback 2.5i between countries? I'm wondering because when I Googled to know the two capacity of my car, I somehow stumbled on an Australian website that listed a number of 1700kg (3,700lbs). Then another listed 2700lbs. I then realized that 2700 was only for the US and Canada: for all the other countries I checked, it's higher. Same for tongue weight. What gives??? I understand some engine options and trims may only be available overseas, but a different chassis? I just don't get it. I figured that maybe this is for liability reasons. Yet, on these boards and others, I see a lot of comments that seem to indicate that even towing below but close to the 2700 limit is a terrible idea. For fun I checked some European forums and people there seem to tow trailers of 3000-3500 without even wondering a second whether they are risking their lives! This blew my mind.

Anyway, I was curious whether anything was known on this topic from the knowleadgable subaruoutback.org crowd. I could not find any good explanation anywhere.
 

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Much of it comes down to regulatory and testing differences between countries. It’s very common for a car to have a much higher towing rating in Europe than its structurally identical US version. Much of it comes down to higher tongue weight requirements in the US for a given load, combined with a set of acceleration criteria based on US highway speeds. With lower tongue weight and lower acceleration requirements, the same car can get a much higher cargo load and towing rating in Europe.


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2012 OB , 2017 Impreza
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This is why there is such a thing as "Grey Market" automobiles. I know people who have purchased cars in Canada and brought into USA.... those cars did NOT have the structural reinforcements in the doors. (and other mandated safety items)

In the end, those folks found it difficult to go thru the regulatory hurdles to get the vehicles approved for USA roads.
 

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2019 Touring (Canadian Model) with Eyesight
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This is why there is such a thing as "Grey Market" automobiles. I know people who have purchased cars in Canada and brought into USA.... those cars did NOT have the structural reinforcements in the doors. (and other mandated safety items)

In the end, those folks found it difficult to go thru the regulatory hurdles to get the vehicles approved for USA roads.
Really? A quick search is not showing this...
Since you know these people, what cars did they purchase in Canada that didn't have the structural reinforcements in the doors?
A Canadian car meets Canadian regulations and is labeled as such. Not having an American label doesn't necessarily mean it has any less safety features.
I am curious to know what cars wouldn't pass.
 

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What are you trying to tow? Like others said, different countries, different road and insurance standards are likely the reason. I don't think they're making different chassis. I tow a small camper and upgraded the springs because the rear end is soft from the factory and sagged too much for my liking. The 2.5 is slow but it gets the job done and stays relatively efficient when towing.

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