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Went to jump in my 2017 Outback this morning and when I push the button... nothing! Doesn't click like a battery problem, no lights, dash, even the door won't lock with or without the key fob. Any help?
 

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2017 2.5 Touring
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Could be a battery failure (it happens) or something was left on (or turned itself on) and drained the battery. Get a jump start and go from there. Better yet, let the dealer deal with it as it is under warranty.
 

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Dead battery doesn't always generate a click in modern cars.

Jump start/charge the battery and drive on.
 

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'16 Outback 2.5i Premium WAM, Factory Hitch, Infinity speakers, Alpine Sub, Cargo Tray/Seat Protectors, Husky Liners, Rally Armor Mudflaps, LED Int Ltg, Subaru LOGO LED Projection Puddle Lights, OUTB
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Went to jump in my 2017 Outback this morning and when I push the button... nothing! Doesn't click like a battery problem, no lights, dash, even the door won't lock with or without the key fob. Any help?
Early on before I replaced factory interior incandescent bulbs with LEDs, I had a dead battery problem the next morning.
Jumped the car, and after it started, I was able to see exactly which light(s) were left on. Note to self, don't get mad, it wasn't me that left them on.


My solution was LEDs and do a nightly doublecheck before nodding off.


Just the LED bulb swap saved me from myself leaving an interior light on more than once. The next morning, plenty of cranking power even after a long night with an LED burning.

Maybe you can benefit from a similar decision. Reminds me why we have keyless entry on the house. How many times did I have to go home from work before installing keyless entry lock on at least one door? 2. Note, I never once locked myself out. Been a flawless solution and well worth the investment :)
 

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2018 Outback Touring 3.6R
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One thing I've noticed in modern cars with all the electronics is that the battery doesn't need to go down very far to render the car suddenly "dead." In the old days, you could let a battery get weaker to the point where the starter would barely turn the engine over and it would still start. But I've been burned twice in the last few years by noticing that a car was cranking a bit slowly, took no action, and a couple weeks later it wouldn't start at all.

So where in the past you could leave an incandescent dome light on overnight and probably still have enough juice to get started in the morning, these days just a couple volt drop in output shuts everything down!
 

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2018 3.6R Limited
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549 Posts

If you'd search for battery, you'd see that it is most popular topic for
MY 2015
.. 2016
.. 2017
... and now 2018.
 

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2017 2.5i Premium Lapis Blue
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My money would be on the already weak OEM battery just being dead. I had this same problem a month or so ago and searching for answers led my to this fine forum.

In my case I had left the rear hatch open for about 30 minutes while test fitting steel wheels before getting winter tires mounted on them. I also had the key on for a little while so I could turn the front wheel checking for clearance issues. The car started after I was finished but it seemed slow cranking, and something beeped a few times when I drove the half block home from my shop to my house but I couldn't tell what it was and there were no warning lights on the dash.

The next morning the battery was completely flat and the electric door locks wouldn't even open. I charged the battery and there were no other problems after that. I drove it without issue for a couple of weeks. The tire shop left the rear hatch open while they were mounting the winter tires and the battery was dead when they were done.

I put a better battery in it and didn't look back. The OEM battery will sit on a shelf and it will get put back in if I don't keep the car at the end of my lease.
 

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2015 Outback Limited, 2.5i, 2021 Touring XT in White
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Over the last three years the battery has been a much discussed topic. Many suggestions ranging from what supper duty battery to buy and ways to reduce the load by using LED lamps. The fact the OEM batteries rated at 365 CCA vs 490 for any general battery of the same size has been well documented. Recently we learned the battery is not under a constant charge. The battery is maintained between 12.0 v (20%) of full charge and 14.2 volts vs the 13.8 v recommended for a full charge.

I measured the lift gate current as 10 amps while raising and a constant 1 amp in the up position. If you parked your car when the charging system had the battery at 20%, you have very little reserve power to operate things like the gate with the OEM battery. It is very easy to get in a state where the car will not start.

Subaru did make changes to battery charging program, they may have changed the battery to a higher CCA. The simple solution is to just buy a good battery. You don’t need a super unit, just a good one.

If you talk to your dealer and call Subaru customer care, there is a very good chance you can get a new battery for free. That is what I did and got a nice bonus gift too ?
 

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'15 Outback 2.5i Premium
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I measured the lift gate current as 10 amps while raising and a constant 1 amp in the up position. If you parked your car when the charging system had the battery at 20%, you have very little reserve power to operate things like the gate with the OEM battery. It is very easy to get in a state where the car will not start.
Just a detail, but the battery current will stay at about 1 amp if any door is open, not just the lift gate. Opening any door or the gate will apparently "wake up" the car's main computer, which turns a bunch of crap on the dashboard on, and it needs the power to do whatever it is it's doing. If it's a front door that's open, also the LED armrest lights, and "puddle lights" turn on. This is with all the lights I can turn off (dome, map, and cargo area), off, and I replaced the incandescent front door puddle lights I can't turn off with dim LEDs.
 

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2018 Outback 2.5 Limited w/ Eyesight - Magnetite Gray
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Just a detail, but the battery current will stay at about 1 amp if any door is open, not just the lift gate. Opening any door or the gate will apparently "wake up" the car's main computer, which turns a bunch of crap on the dashboard on, and it needs the power to do whatever it is it's doing. If it's a front door that's open, also the LED armrest lights, and "puddle lights" turn on. This is with all the lights I can turn off (dome, map, and cargo area), off, and I replaced the incandescent front door puddle lights I can't turn off with dim LEDs.
This is fascinating (read: frustrating). I just sold my very early build 2010, which was the best car I've ever owned and picked up a 2018. Never had any power issues with the 2010 - camping, hatch open for extended periods, leaving dome light on overnight even. Already I've had a dead and weak battery due to having hatch open for too long. Like others, I've replaced all interior lights/puddle lights with LED and also have a new battery on the way. I find this completely backwards and unacceptable from a company that is so outdoors focused, but I guess it is what it is.

I have two questions for everyone.

1. Everything I've read indicated that the charging logic update applies only through MY2017 - do we know if the charging update is already included on MY2018?
2. Other than needing to manually close the power hatch afterwards, any observed adverse side effects from shimming (others have suggested a carabiner) something into the latch mechanism to fool the car into shutting down the thirsty electronics?

Thanks!
 

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2015 3.6R Limited w/ES
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2. Other than needing to manually close the power hatch afterwards, any observed adverse side effects from shimming (others have suggested a carabiner) something into the latch mechanism to fool the car into shutting down the thirsty electronics?
Nope, I've checked, this works to kill the 1 amp draw. No need for a carabiner or even a tool in fact, you can just push the latch in with a key until it won't move any further.
 

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2018 Outback 2.5i Limited Eyesight - Remote Start - Auto Dimming In/Outside Mirrors
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Over the last three years the battery has been a much discussed topic. Many suggestions ranging from what supper duty battery to buy and ways to reduce the load by using LED lamps. The fact the OEM batteries rated at 365 CCA vs 490 for any general battery of the same size has been well documented. Recently we learned the battery is not under a constant charge. The battery is maintained between 12.0 v (20%) of full charge and 14.2 volts vs the 13.8 v recommended for a full charge.
...
The alternator may be cranking out 13.8 to 14.2 volts ... but that is to charge the battery and/or operate the vehicle. To charge a battery you need to give it a higher voltage. Take the alternator out of the picture though and your battery will probably sit anywhere between 12.5 to 12.8 volts fully charged. Each cell holds typically between 2.1 to 2.2 volts fully charged. 12 Volt battery having 6 cells - hence resting 12.5 to 12.8 volts.

Smart chargers will vary the voltage to the battery during the charging process.

Phase 1 Bulk - charges to about 80%: High constant amps, low voltage increasing to high (14+ volts).
Phase 2 Absorption - charges to about 95%: High constant voltage (14+ volts), high amps decreasing to low.
Phase 3 Float - tops off/maintains battery: Not has high constant voltage (13+ volts), low amps (depending on charger may be constant, may pulse - but low).

Good chargers will consider temperature and up the voltage a little bit more when cold and drop the voltage when hot.

Now ... of course if the demands of the vehicle are greater than what the battery needs to charge ... there will be problems - eventually. If I know my cars are going to sit a few days - and if I remember ;) - every few months to 6 months I try to throw my charger on them to give the battery a good deep charge.
 

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2017 Outback Limited -2.5 CVT ---- 'Gone' 2014 Outback Limited - 2.5 CVT ---- 'Rehomed' 2012 Outback Limited - 2.5 CVT - Deep Indigo Pearl ---- "RIP" 2010 Outback - 2.5 CVT - Silver - So's my hair
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Toast is done...

Bet there's a light on.

I've experienced this twice by leaving the light over the rear hatch on over night.

Now 'glued' in off position.
 

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2015 3.6R Limited w/ES
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The stock lights on my 2015 were very power hungry. Replacing all the interior lights with LEDs reduced the draw on the battery by 80% with all interior lights illuminated (2.7A with the incandescent bulbs came down to 0.5A with the LEDs)
 

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Gotta have one with today's cars. Money well spent.

 

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2017 Outback Limited 2.5, Twilight Blue/Ivory, Eyesight. Also 1995 BMW 525i with 240,000 miles
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Just a detail, but the battery current will stay at about 1 amp if any door is open, not just the lift gate. Opening any door or the gate will apparently "wake up" the car's main computer, which turns a bunch of crap on the dashboard on, and it needs the power to do whatever it is it's doing. If it's a front door that's open, also the LED armrest lights, and "puddle lights" turn on. This is with all the lights I can turn off (dome, map, and cargo area), off, and I replaced the incandescent front door puddle lights I can't turn off with dim LEDs.
Interesting. I think it might replace my dome lights with "warm" LEDS. I dislike the cold white light look. I replaced the puddle lights with "bright" LEDs. I just wanted to see better.
 

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Interesting. I think it might replace my dome lights with "warm" LEDS. I dislike the cold white light look. I replaced the puddle lights with "bright" LEDs. I just wanted to see better.
With the original "puddle" lights you need to carry a spare pair of shoes and socks.....!! What were they thinking?
 

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'15 Outback 2.5i Premium
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Interesting. I think it might replace my dome lights with "warm" LEDS. I dislike the cold white light look. I replaced the puddle lights with "bright" LEDs. I just wanted to see better.
I used dim red LEDs for the puddle lights because I use the car at dark-sky astronomy events. Why bother with red LEDs at all and not just remove the white incandescent bulbs? Good question! Just because I could, I suppose.

For the same reason, the dome light and cargo area lights are almost always switched off so I don't annoy people by opening a door after forgetting to turn them off. Some people replace these with red, but I find I do want the white interior light occasionally, so I just leave 'em turned off until needed.

Those folks often don't take kindly to white lights out where it's supposed to be dark, and will let you know about it!

With the original "puddle" lights you need to carry a spare pair of shoes and socks.....!! What were they thinking?
I didn't find the original incandescent puddle lights deficient. If anything, I thought they were too bright, but my needs and preferences are different than most people's.
 
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