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You're right, it does seem awfully long to check or replace a tiny screw! I wonder, don't they check things over before it leaves the factory?! This would save dealers wanting to sell cars; and customers wanting to buy aggravation.
The positive of all of this is that it will be corrected before people receive their cars. At least SOA caught the issue and are making sure it gets fixed.

I wonder if this will now this will delay delivery dates for people that ordered. I need my car before winter! I'm glad I ordered in early August, because November delivery seems like a long wait. I just hope we don't have a early snow storm!

On the flip side, because of this issue; maybe they will really ramp up production because people will be anxious to get their orders and then, maybe people will get their cars earlier than estimated
Do they typically operate the factory below maximum capacity? I’m just wondering if it’s even possible to ramp up production if Outback sales have been steadily rising over the years.
 

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exactly. there was a thread awhile ago about whether we should be worried about QA on the Gen 6. Consensus among all the dealers and salesmen on here was that these forums are an echo chamber and Suby owners are a lot more "particular" and tinkerers than owners of other brands. and that were just being overly critical. But this is definitely not normal and a bad sign. 4-8 weeks for a screw seems fishy. in seattle, which is a subaru stronghold with several major dealerships, each of them has one onyx on the lot for people to kick the tires of and about about 30 2020 vehicles "in transit." oh, and the 19's are just about sold out.
This is going to stink for the dealers who won't be able to sell or even allow test drives! Imagine having to tell customers this on a brand new car....it could potentially scare buyers away. It doesn't help the quality control image! It's a minor issue, however; on a brand new car that people spend their hard earned money on, people want everything to be perfect. Rightly so!
 

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Do they typically operate the factory below maximum capacity? I’m just wondering if it’s even possible to ramp up production if Outback sales have been steadily rising over the years.
True, good point. Forgot about that.
 

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Discussion Starter #84
A lot of the critical fastening is done with DC Electric Tools...that improves the precision and also allows the manufacturer to collect records in case they get sued, etc. it is not out of the realm of possibility that their tool got out of calibration or maybe it was done with a less sophisticated tool that was not properly calibrated or maybe it was determined to change the torque values.

Realize this is all speculation, but I have spent a good bit of time on production lines...my company sells those kinds of tools.

They may be doing some kind of cycle testing to verify their corrective action and that takes time.

Japanese manufacturers are very structured in their corrective action plans that must get multiple levels of approval before implementation, verification, and release
 

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A lot of the critical fastening is done with DC Electric Tools...that improves the precision and also allows the manufacturer to collect records in case they get sued, etc. it is not out of the realm of possibility that their tool got out of calibration or maybe it was done with a less sophisticated tool that was not properly calibrated or maybe it was determined to change the torque values.

Realize this is all speculation, but I have spent a good bit of time on production lines...my company sells those kinds of tools.

They may be doing some kind of cycle testing to verify their corrective action and that takes time.

Japanese manufacturers are very structured in their corrective action plans that must get multiple levels of approval before implementation, verification, and release
I didn't realize that. Thanks. Either way, I'm glad it's being addressed instead of just brushing it under the rug like other manufacturers have done in the past!
 

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Discussion Starter #87
Lots at stake here....huge potential liabilties if cars fail in the field....they also want to preserve the reputation of their flagship vehicle...I have every confidence they will properly address this.
My 2018 Legacy had a recall on the gas gauge...it took weeks for them to implement a software fix. Was kind of disappointed it took that long, but they fixed it first time and it worked correctly right out of the blocks.
 

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I don't understand why my Texas Subaru dealer just confirmed my arrival on the 11th to pick up my 2020 Touring?
 

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2008 OB Limited 2.5i, Portland OR USA
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I wonder, don't they check things over before it leaves the factory?! This would save dealers wanting to sell cars; and customers wanting to buy aggravation.
A modern automobile has tens of thousands of parts, many of which aren't even put together at the final assembly location.

How much time should be allocated at manufacturing stages for this arduous task, and how much of the cost are you willing to bear in the purchase price?

I thought so.
 

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The positive of all of this is that it will be corrected before people receive their cars. At least SOA caught the issue and are making sure it gets fixed.
The negative is, what else may have been missed and not caught? Not sure why so many are so anxious to be a 2020 Subaru OB guinea pig. I'd be waiting a year.
 
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The negative is, what else may have been missed and not caught? Not sure why so many are so anxious to be a 2020 Subaru OB guinea pig. I'd be waiting a year.
this is what i was worried about, not so much the infotainment system being poor, but all the little things. my 2018 had a misaligned moonroof that bounced around and a bad steering rack. both those things should have been caught at the factory and put significant strain on me and the dealership.
 

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A modern automobile has tens of thousands of parts, many of which aren't even put together at the final assembly location.

How much time should be allocated at manufacturing stages for this arduous task, and how much of the cost are you willing tto bear in the purchase price?

I thought so.
I'm just saying that they should be more thorough in checking things before it leaves the factory. I think people would be more than willing to wait for something that is made well, and willing to pay more for it.
As an example, more people are buying Made in America products; despite the higher cost. It supports the economy here. Sometimes you do indeed 'get what you pay for'.
 

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this is what i was worried about, not so much the infotainment system being poor, but all the little things. my 2018 had a misaligned moonroof that bounced around and a bad steering rack. both those things should have been caught at the factory and put significant strain on me and the dealership.
Yea, that's exactly what I was trying to say in previous post. A brand new car should not have these issues. It's happening across all manufacturers and I think it speaks to using more and more robots to replace human workers. Also, it seems that some people don't take pride in their work anymore. 'Close is good enough'. Yes, I realize if everything was done by hand that wouldn't necessarily be practical in today's society. Plus, this is a mass production car. Unless you have master craftsmen, there will always be issues.
Maybe I'm just slightly OCD. My father is a general contractor, and a lot of times he has to fix what someone else did sloppily; or 'close enough' because it causes other problems down the road.
The quality of things are just not the same anymore, I don't care what you buy.

Despite all of this, I'm glad it's being addressed. I'm looking forward to getting my Outback.
 

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I'm just saying that they should be more thorough in checking things before it leaves the factory. I think people would be more than willing to wait for something that is made well, and willing to pay more for it.
As an example, more people are buying Made in America products; despite the higher cost. It supports the economy here. Sometimes you do indeed 'get what you pay for'.
Overworked employees? Management asking more than it is capable of delivering?
 

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The negative is, what else may have been missed and not caught? Not sure why so many are so anxious to be a 2020 Subaru OB guinea pig. I'd be waiting a year.
That's true with anything whatsoever. Automobiles have been around for over a century and this car's plant is extremely experienced. It may be just that the record keeping was not sufficient enough for these bolts and they want to make certain. It's likely fine; QA is good anyway to have caught it. If you are that concerned over being a guinea pig there are other forums on this site. Might I interest you in an 87 Porsche 951 I've rebuilt and am selling? I assure you you will not be a guinea pig! haha I know a guy that has a horse also he might sell ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter #98
Lol..Daniel, you are hilarious..i have a 1998 Boxster.
I dont ding the workers...manufactuerers have to design repeatable process that prevent errors.. in this case, it is very apparent that Subaru is rushing to introduce this product.
Puts a burden on everyone..i guarantee Subaru will stand behind their cars...especially this new model
 

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I'm just saying that they should be more thorough in checking things before it leaves the factory.
Watch this video, and then tell me how such inspections are supposed to work into the production flow for items not produced right in that plant.


In the case of the Gen 5 steering columns that you referenced, the problem was that a supplier did not machine a part to correct specifications. Should these assembly workers or robots be checking every single dimensional specification to tolerance with micrometers to assure absolutely nothing leaves out of spec? Should they be testing the strength of the materials? Where do you stop with this process?
I think people would be more than willing to wait for something that is made well, and willing to pay more for it.
As an example, more people are buying Made in America products; despite the higher cost. It supports the economy here. Sometimes you do indeed 'get what you pay for'.
Our import / export statistics disagree with this assertion. People say they support it, yes, but words don't cut it - they vote with their wallets.
 
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