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Discussion Starter #1
My wife and I just bought an 05 OBXT w 90k on it and at first we loved the plush ride. Now, a week later we've decided it needs to be upgraded. I have an opportunity to get a set of new King 2" lift springs for half price so were considering that route or should we upgrade to new struts and do Rallitek sway bars? We don't really want to lift the car too much, so that's why I'm considering sway bars.
 

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Where are you getting 1/2 price Kings is the question?:confused::p

The Kings will raise the car, the sway bars will tighten the ride. My understanding is that the Rallitek sway bars are a really good product.

But seriously...where are you getting 1/2 price Kings?!?!?!?!?
 

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Unless you are doing much real back-road and off-roading with your car, I would not raise it. It may look mean but it may also handle lousy when you are driving on paved roads, not to mention possible problems associated with aligning the car (Four-Wheel Alignment), if it is even possible to align it once it is raised 2".

If the car feels like it has too much of a "baby-carriage" feeling to it, and if it bounces further than you would like, or more than one time after hitting a dip in the road, then new struts and strut mounts would be in order.

Our OBW has 121K miles on it and I just got done spending a month -- changed all four struts to KYB ExcelG's with new bellows and bumpers, new strut mounts on front and rear, changed all the bushings in both front and rear Sway-Bars (the bushings were all worn to the point of looseness and rattling with every bump).

I also installed new Moog Sway Bar Links for both the front and back, replaced the right-front axle assembly, replaced the right-front inner and outer tie rod, replaced both tie rod ends with Moog (that now both have grease fittings). The rear Sway Bar links do not have grease fittings, which is just as well, as that would be the only thing on the rear with zerks. I also had to replace the lower right-front ball joint as I destroyed the boot trying to remove it to remove the axle (before I suddenly realized I didn't have to do anything with it)!

The car feels much tighter, even than when we bought it new in 2005! To me, the car always had a baby-carriage feeling, like the suspension could be stiffer from the factory. Well, the four new KYB ExcelG's changed all that! They are a happy-medium between factory original and some high-end struts like Koni Fully-Adjustible! The car takes turns better, hugs the road, even on washboard surfaces around turns. I am so satisfied with the way it turned out, doing all the work myself with the help of DIY online repair manual.

I also removed all rotors and replaced all four rotors (discs), installed all new parking brake components in the rear disc inner drums and adjusted the brake lever at the console so you only need to pull the handle up about three notches or so to hold the car in place, of course you could really pull hard if needed to the point of locking up the rear wheels! Installed all new Ceramic Brake Pads along with necessary clips and high-temp grease on pad contact points to prevent rattling and noises.

I changed all fluids to Full-Synthetic, flushed the AT with 11 quarts Valvoline Dexron VI (6) Full Synthetic Automatic Transmission Fluid (takes ten quarts total), including changing the spin-on oil filter for the trans, located in the left-front fender, adjacent to the battery (battery had to be removed to replace the AT Filter).

Since the car calls for Dexron III (3), and, since the new Valvoline Full-Synthetic VI (6) is backwards-compatible with III, the trans has never felt so good! While I was at it, since the power steering uses Dexron III, I also flushed that and installed the same Full-Synthetic VI (6) as in the trans. I installed all new brake calipers and bled the entire brake system with Castrol Dot 4 (fully-compatible with Dot 3 systems).

When the job was done, I Bedded-In the brakes to marry the new pads to the new disc rotors! I was satisfied with the results of the Bedding-In as the pedal is right-there, stiff with very little play and needs less pressure to stop than it ever has, since it was new.

After doing much research, this is the procedure I used for Bedding-In the new Brakes, and which I would highly recommend:
Instructions for bedding in your brakes

The shop manual tells you to apply 110 pounds pressure to the brake pedal with the engine running and the distance between the bottom of the steering wheel to the surface of the brake pedal is measured in inches. When the pedal is fully out, there can only be so many inches difference (about 3 5/8" memory tells me). Ours ended up being well-within the specs called for in the manual, being about an inch less!
 

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Thats an impressive amount of work both physically and it would seem financially. But its certainly not **** you want to be stuck having to do in a couple of months...

J makes a good point though Robe, if you are just looking to tighten up the ride a set of GR2s might be enough to give you the response you want. FWIW most people switch to them when doing ANY suspension mod so maybe that would be a great place to start.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The Kings are at my friends shop. They were purchased but before they were installed, the car was totalled. On a scale of 1-10 stock is 1, where would the Kings fall? Also, he said they would lift it 2". Is that 2" from usdm or is that from Australian height? If I pass on the springs, I'll put them up on marketplace to share a good deal.

I think at this point, since there won't be any serious offloading adventure in our near future, we'll go w Rallitek sways front and rear w new end links, strut mounts and kybs. This is an amazing car that at this point, doesn't handle for crap
 

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Does this car see snow? If so, it may be worth while to read the 'ghostwalk' thread. May help save some time and money while you're attacking the suspension.
 

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Thats an impressive amount of work both physically and it would seem financially. But its certainly not **** you want to be stuck having to do in a couple of months...

J makes a good point though Robe, if you are just looking to tighten up the ride a set of GR2s might be enough to give you the response you want. FWIW most people switch to them when doing ANY suspension mod so maybe that would be a great place to start.
Thank you!
I enjoy doing anything that takes figuring out how to do it. Some of this was new for me, but I tackled it anyway. For a week or so I wondered if the car will ever be on the road again, or just be stuck on four jackstands until the day I die!

Then, things all started coming together rather quickly. I wanted to be certain I was not missing anything, so I got some white touch up paint and every single nut and bolt that I torqued to specifications, I ended up putting a mark of white paint on the nut, adjoining threads and the body/frame where connected. That really helped me quickly see just what I have and have not finished at any one point in time. The system worked really well!

I have a local account at an automotive store and get most things wholesale. Had we needed to pay retail for all this plus pay $60 - $80 labor per hour for all this work, we might as well have bought a new car instead! Like I said, the way it drives now is better than when it was new. When I was all completed, it needed an alignment badly, the steering wheel was off about 1/4 of the way, one front wheel was visibly out at the bottom and I suspect the wheels were not both aimed straight ahead!

Only after the alignment could I really, then, enjoy the fruits of my labor!

I am hoping this car goes another 120K miles!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The car should see snow (we live in PA) but after last year I'm not sure. The ghost walking thread is my next read. I want to get everything together before I dig into it to minimize down time.

Thanks for the input so far guys
 

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Long story short with the ghost walk...have your alignments down with anywhere from 100-400lbs of ballast and the sway bars will probably be more friendly if you are consistently driving without a load in back. For some reason the ass of the car dances in bad weather despite all the engineering for it not to but messing with toe/camber and tightening up the ride seems to really help.
 

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As far as my research has led me no...they make the back of the car less responsive. But, someone else may be able to give a more definitive answer.
 
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