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2005 Subaru Outback H6 VDC
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The throttle body is up near the big black plenum at the back of the engine closest to the firewall coming from your air cleaner. There's a hose on the drivers side, toward the top, with a spring clap on it--that's the coolant hose leading from your throttle body.
Oh I see. I thought that pair was referred to as the heater hoses.

Okay, in any case, I'll go ahead and give that a shot. Thank you!
 

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2005 Subaru Outback H6 VDC
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I can't bleed the **** thing. I filled the block through the passenger side radiator hose until it was spilling coolant. Then reattached that hose to the radiator. Next, I attached my no-spill funnel, started the car, and got it up to operating temp. No matter how much I squeeze the lower hose, it doesn't seem to get more than warm. Additionally, after about 10 minutes, the no spill funnel went from "holding a tiny bit of extra coolant" to "almost full and violently bubbling coolant over everything in the area." I shut the car off.

I also felt no heat the entire time. Previously, I had intermittent heat from the driver's side. But I've flushed my heater core previously, two separate times. Forwards and backwards.
 

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2006 OutBean, 2005 LGTW
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Discussion Starter #703
I can't bleed the **** thing. I filled the block through the passenger side radiator hose until it was spilling coolant. Then reattached that hose to the radiator. Next, I attached my no-spill funnel, started the car, and got it up to operating temp. No matter how much I squeeze the lower hose, it doesn't seem to get more than warm. Additionally, after about 10 minutes, the no spill funnel went from "holding a tiny bit of extra coolant" to "almost full and violently bubbling coolant over everything in the area." I shut the car off.

I also felt no heat the entire time. Previously, I had intermittent heat from the driver's side. But I've flushed my heater core previously, two separate times. Forwards and backwards.
You could try filling it through the upper heater core hose but honestly, it's kind of a pain.

These things are a bitch to bleed. Keep at it. Maybe someone will chime in with the factory service recommendations. It's something like.. fill the system, put the cap on, rev to 2500 rpms a few times, turn engine off, fill system, put the cap on, rev to 2500 rpms a few times, turn engine off, fill the system, put the cap on, rev to 2500 rpms until it's full.
 

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2005 Subaru Outback H6 VDC
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You could try filling it through the upper heater core hose but honestly, it's kind of a pain.

These things are a bitch to bleed. Keep at it. Maybe someone will chime in with the factory service recommendations. It's something like.. fill the system, put the cap on, rev to 2500 rpms a few times, turn engine off, fill system, put the cap on, rev to 2500 rpms a few times, turn engine off, fill the system, put the cap on, rev to 2500 rpms until it's full.
I have the FSM, so I've seen the FSM recommendations before as well. I'm mostly concerned about the violent bubbling. Is that typical? The coolant level increase within the no-spill funnel itself must have been at least 24 oz.
 

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Outback 2011 3.6R Premium
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787 Posts
Do yourself a favour and remove the thermostat and drill a 3/16” hole in the face. This simple procedure allows coolant to flow past the thermostat when filling and has minimal if any affect on the cooling system.

I do this on EVERY thermostat (Subaru or otherwise) and “burping” the system becomes a “non-event”. I never use a “no spill funnel” and I do not even own one.

I slowly add coolant through the radiator neck until full, start the engine, turn the heater on full and run for about ten minutes until the coolant in the top of the radiator is hot (topping off as required) and the heater is putting out hot air.

I make sure to check the radiator AND overflow bottle once the engine has cooled for several hours and top off as required. I check again a few days later if the car has been driven for more than about 30 minutes at a time to make sure levels are OK and then about once a month after that.

Seagrass
 

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2006 OutBean, 2005 LGTW
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Discussion Starter #707
I have the FSM, so I've seen the FSM recommendations before as well. I'm mostly concerned about the violent bubbling. Is that typical? The coolant level increase within the no-spill funnel itself must have been at least 24 oz.
Yeah, it's typical to have the violent eruption like that if you've got air in the system. The coolant is boiling with no water flow, so, eruption.

I once took back out and redid headgaskets on an engine I had just done the top end on due to that eruption. I swore the headgasket was blown, so, pulled the engine, slapped new headgaskets on it after having the heads re-milled, slapped the engine back in and the fucking thing did the exact same thing... **** air pockets.

I use a coolant vacuum filler now and it makes it much easier but it's still not a perfect solution.
 

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Discussion Starter #708
Well, I haven't forgotten about this project.. just been on the back burner. I have a small update though. I ended up buying an OEM Subaru radiator and a new set of hoses since the other ones have been cut down to fit the 40mm radiator.

The official Subaru radiator was not cheap but I notice a few subtle differences between the old TYC radiator and the new Subaru (denso) unit that I feel are kinda noteworthy.

First, the coating on the radiator. It looks to me like the radiator is blasted with some sort of "nano" flakes of aluminum or something. It's sort of like a dust. I noticed it right away on the Subaru radiator because it looks kinda like metal flake.

This is the coating on the new Subaru radiator:
475393

versus the coating on the cheaper TYC
475394


The next thing I noticed were tiny fins on the inside of the cross fins between the radiator tubes. On the official Subaru radiator, they're much more consistent and less jagged as compared to the cheaper TYC version.
Subaru crossfins:
475395

TYC cross fins
475396


Also note the consistency of the coating on the Subaru Denso vs. the TYC unit.

Finally, the last thing I notice is the shape of the fins themselves... the Subaru radiator has nicely curved fins with horizontal fins rather than the abrupt and angular TYC version..

Subaru radiator:
475397

TYC cross fins:
475399


I don't see any other differences between the two radiators except the small subtleties of what I pointed out above. Dimensionally, they're the same. They've got he same tube count too so somewhere along the line Subaru upgraded to the denser count radiator.

All of these subtleties look like they'd increase efficiency over the cheaper TYC version. Will they be enough to keep my engine cool? We'll have to wait a few months to find out but I'm definitely hopeful.

ninja edit

After reviewing my post, another difference pointed itself out to me--the cross fins are denser on the Subaru radiator than the TYC, per inch.

second ninja edit

It looks like how the cross fins are soldered to the coolant tubes is much more consistent in the Subaru radiator than the TYC. In some images of the TYC it almost looks like the fins are just soldered on the end but the Subaru radiator looks soldered completely, if that makes any sense.

I'd love to hear your thoughts on it... these are very small things and I had to look at it for a while just to see the tiny little differences but if they all add up--could it be enough?
 
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