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The throttle body is up near the big black plenum at the back of the engine closest to the firewall coming from your air cleaner. There's a hose on the drivers side, toward the top, with a spring clap on it--that's the coolant hose leading from your throttle body.
Oh I see. I thought that pair was referred to as the heater hoses.

Okay, in any case, I'll go ahead and give that a shot. Thank you!
 

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I can't bleed the **** thing. I filled the block through the passenger side radiator hose until it was spilling coolant. Then reattached that hose to the radiator. Next, I attached my no-spill funnel, started the car, and got it up to operating temp. No matter how much I squeeze the lower hose, it doesn't seem to get more than warm. Additionally, after about 10 minutes, the no spill funnel went from "holding a tiny bit of extra coolant" to "almost full and violently bubbling coolant over everything in the area." I shut the car off.

I also felt no heat the entire time. Previously, I had intermittent heat from the driver's side. But I've flushed my heater core previously, two separate times. Forwards and backwards.
 

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Discussion Starter #703
I can't bleed the **** thing. I filled the block through the passenger side radiator hose until it was spilling coolant. Then reattached that hose to the radiator. Next, I attached my no-spill funnel, started the car, and got it up to operating temp. No matter how much I squeeze the lower hose, it doesn't seem to get more than warm. Additionally, after about 10 minutes, the no spill funnel went from "holding a tiny bit of extra coolant" to "almost full and violently bubbling coolant over everything in the area." I shut the car off.

I also felt no heat the entire time. Previously, I had intermittent heat from the driver's side. But I've flushed my heater core previously, two separate times. Forwards and backwards.
You could try filling it through the upper heater core hose but honestly, it's kind of a pain.

These things are a bitch to bleed. Keep at it. Maybe someone will chime in with the factory service recommendations. It's something like.. fill the system, put the cap on, rev to 2500 rpms a few times, turn engine off, fill system, put the cap on, rev to 2500 rpms a few times, turn engine off, fill the system, put the cap on, rev to 2500 rpms until it's full.
 
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You could try filling it through the upper heater core hose but honestly, it's kind of a pain.

These things are a bitch to bleed. Keep at it. Maybe someone will chime in with the factory service recommendations. It's something like.. fill the system, put the cap on, rev to 2500 rpms a few times, turn engine off, fill system, put the cap on, rev to 2500 rpms a few times, turn engine off, fill the system, put the cap on, rev to 2500 rpms until it's full.
I have the FSM, so I've seen the FSM recommendations before as well. I'm mostly concerned about the violent bubbling. Is that typical? The coolant level increase within the no-spill funnel itself must have been at least 24 oz.
 

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Outback 2011 3.6R Premium
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Do yourself a favour and remove the thermostat and drill a 3/16” hole in the face. This simple procedure allows coolant to flow past the thermostat when filling and has minimal if any affect on the cooling system.

I do this on EVERY thermostat (Subaru or otherwise) and “burping” the system becomes a “non-event”. I never use a “no spill funnel” and I do not even own one.

I slowly add coolant through the radiator neck until full, start the engine, turn the heater on full and run for about ten minutes until the coolant in the top of the radiator is hot (topping off as required) and the heater is putting out hot air.

I make sure to check the radiator AND overflow bottle once the engine has cooled for several hours and top off as required. I check again a few days later if the car has been driven for more than about 30 minutes at a time to make sure levels are OK and then about once a month after that.

Seagrass
 
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if a head gasket is leaking internally, you may be seeing those gasses escaping.
 

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Discussion Starter #707
I have the FSM, so I've seen the FSM recommendations before as well. I'm mostly concerned about the violent bubbling. Is that typical? The coolant level increase within the no-spill funnel itself must have been at least 24 oz.
Yeah, it's typical to have the violent eruption like that if you've got air in the system. The coolant is boiling with no water flow, so, eruption.

I once took back out and redid headgaskets on an engine I had just done the top end on due to that eruption. I swore the headgasket was blown, so, pulled the engine, slapped new headgaskets on it after having the heads re-milled, slapped the engine back in and the fucking thing did the exact same thing... **** air pockets.

I use a coolant vacuum filler now and it makes it much easier but it's still not a perfect solution.
 

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Discussion Starter #708
Well, I haven't forgotten about this project.. just been on the back burner. I have a small update though. I ended up buying an OEM Subaru radiator and a new set of hoses since the other ones have been cut down to fit the 40mm radiator.

The official Subaru radiator was not cheap but I notice a few subtle differences between the old TYC radiator and the new Subaru (denso) unit that I feel are kinda noteworthy.

First, the coating on the radiator. It looks to me like the radiator is blasted with some sort of "nano" flakes of aluminum or something. It's sort of like a dust. I noticed it right away on the Subaru radiator because it looks kinda like metal flake.

This is the coating on the new Subaru radiator:
475393

versus the coating on the cheaper TYC
475394


The next thing I noticed were tiny fins on the inside of the cross fins between the radiator tubes. On the official Subaru radiator, they're much more consistent and less jagged as compared to the cheaper TYC version.
Subaru crossfins:
475395

TYC cross fins
475396


Also note the consistency of the coating on the Subaru Denso vs. the TYC unit.

Finally, the last thing I notice is the shape of the fins themselves... the Subaru radiator has nicely curved fins with horizontal fins rather than the abrupt and angular TYC version..

Subaru radiator:
475397

TYC cross fins:
475399


I don't see any other differences between the two radiators except the small subtleties of what I pointed out above. Dimensionally, they're the same. They've got he same tube count too so somewhere along the line Subaru upgraded to the denser count radiator.

All of these subtleties look like they'd increase efficiency over the cheaper TYC version. Will they be enough to keep my engine cool? We'll have to wait a few months to find out but I'm definitely hopeful.

ninja edit

After reviewing my post, another difference pointed itself out to me--the cross fins are denser on the Subaru radiator than the TYC, per inch.

second ninja edit

It looks like how the cross fins are soldered to the coolant tubes is much more consistent in the Subaru radiator than the TYC. In some images of the TYC it almost looks like the fins are just soldered on the end but the Subaru radiator looks soldered completely, if that makes any sense.

I'd love to hear your thoughts on it... these are very small things and I had to look at it for a while just to see the tiny little differences but if they all add up--could it be enough?
 
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Just wanted to drop in again and say thanks again for sticking with it, @aesthetic.rake ! hadn't checked this thread in a while, but I anxiously await your results with the OEM radiator!
 

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Discussion Starter #710
Just wanted to drop in again and say thanks again for sticking with it, @aesthetic.rake ! hadn't checked this thread in a while, but I anxiously await your results with the OEM radiator!
Thanks for the bump and I appreciate your support. What will this be.. our third year with it? As soon as the 07 Limited project is wrapped up I plan to put this car under the knife once more. New radiator and hoses obviously but I'm debating on whether I want to put a new oil cooler in it at the same time. IF one of those helps bring the temp down I'd like to know which one it was so I'm thinking slap the radiator in along with a bunch of other quasi top secret goodies in the car then wait for summer, see what happens with the temp and if the OEM rad does nothing then swap out the oil cooler then maybe go from there. Thoughts?

Thanks to everyone who's helped in this thread too.
 

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Yep, 3 years sounds about right! I was planning on putting a new radiator in mine at the beginning of this summer but it would have been aftermarket. Granted, the one I was looking at was one that a forum member (can't remember who at the moment) bought and it solved his running warm problem, but if it's just plain better to put in the OEM one that's the route I ought to go to. I wish I had all of your diagnostics and mechanical skills! I can do a fair bit, but nothing like what you've done so your work has been a life-saver for me.
 

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I'm coming back to this thread to hang my head in shame. :cautious::LOL: I've been following this thread for QUITE a long time now hoping to find possible solutions to my warming-running Outback (at least in the summer when loaded heavily and pushed (climbing uphill or accelerating back to highway speeds from a stop)). @aesthetic.rake has even explained multiple times to check in between the radiator and condenser for debris.

I had looked at the back of my radiator and shined light through the front and back trying get a feel for how blocked it was, if at all. After doing what I thought was a decent job inspecting, nothing looked to be blocked in any meaningful way so I just dismissed the idea.

But today after seeing aesthetic.rake's comments on a thread about a warming running OBXT I decided to unbolt the top and peer in between the condenser and radiator. Here's what I found:


Moral of the story, check thoroughly! And yes, radiators can be deceptively dirty! I'm sure this will clear up my issue. Mine only ever got 2—mayyybe three ticks (in an Arizona summer, and fully loaded)—warm on the temp gauge, so I'm hopeful that this will clear up my issue. Cross your fingers for me!
 

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Seen other makes of water pumps where the impeller spun on the shaft or was corroded so little was left to move coolant. Could be the problem...
 

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Discussion Starter #714
I'm coming back to this thread to hang my head in shame. :cautious::LOL: I've been following this thread for QUITE a long time now hoping to find possible solutions to my warming-running Outback (at least in the summer when loaded heavily and pushed (climbing uphill or accelerating back to highway speeds from a stop)). @aesthetic.rake has even explained multiple times to check in between the radiator and condenser for debris.

I had looked at the back of my radiator and shined light through the front and back trying get a feel for how blocked it was, if at all. After doing what I thought was a decent job inspecting, nothing looked to be blocked in any meaningful way so I just dismissed the idea.

But today after seeing aesthetic.rake's comments on a thread about a warming running OBXT I decided to unbolt the top and peer in between the condenser and radiator. Here's what I found:


Moral of the story, check thoroughly! And yes, radiators can be deceptively dirty! I'm sure this will clear up my issue. Mine only ever got 2—mayyybe three ticks (in an Arizona summer, and fully loaded)—warm on the temp gauge, so I'm hopeful that this will clear up my issue. Cross your fingers for me!
There it is!

Post #708 (just a few up) has photos of the differences between the cheap TYC and OEM Subaru radiators. The OEM unit is obviously quite a bit more expensive, but much better made. I don't know if the differences in how it's built will equate to differences in how it operates but beings you're in the heat like you are, I might opt for a Subaru unit.

You can use one of those thin break away razor blades to cut the foam off the OE radiator and double sided tape to attach the foam to the new radiator. The double sided tape doesn't hold the foam that well but it'll hold it long enough to get the new radiator in place and the radiator support thereafter will pinch the foam holding it in place. You could also clean that radiator and reuse it, if you dared. Some AC condenser cleaner from home depot sprayed on the backside and allowed to soak in, then rinse it out. I'm not sure I'd do this but you could.

Thanks for the bump. I've been thinking a lot about this thread lately. My projects have come to an end and I'm ready to start thinking about building cars again.
 

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On some hotter days, I plan on going up some steep hills maybe with a trailer to see if I can replicate the running hotter then normal condition we have both seen in our cars. The only change I have now is raptor headers and retuned. What if its caused by poor flow factory headers and egts going up from sustaining 3k+ revs? I will even try and get a log while I'm at it. Maybe the 2nd tick(3/4) isn't as hot as we think. Just a simple warning saying hey im a bit hot, but not out of the ordinary for conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter #716
On some hotter days, I plan on going up some steep hills maybe with a trailer to see if I can replicate the running hotter then normal condition we have both seen in our cars. The only change I have now is raptor headers and retuned. What if its caused by poor flow factory headers and egts going up from sustaining 3k+ revs? I will even try and get a log while I'm at it. Maybe the 2nd tick(3/4) isn't as hot as we think. Just a simple warning saying hey im a bit hot, but not out of the ordinary for conditions.
I think @kiwisix and I discovered that in the owners manual there's a diagram of the temp gauge and it pretty much says that there's no problem if it's not in the red, provided conditions warrant it, or something to that effect. I'll see if I can find it.

I've long wondered if I've been chasing my tail on this and it's 95% of the reason I haven't tossed a JDM engine in this thing..
 

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I think @kiwisix and I discovered that in the owners manual there's a diagram of the temp gauge and it pretty much says that there's no problem if it's not in the red, provided conditions warrant it, or something to that effect. I'll see if I can find it.

I've long wondered if I've been chasing my tail on this and it's 95% of the reason I haven't tossed a JDM engine in this thing..
I remember that, but I want to see the exact temp its reading. What if its only 10*F? I know the gauges have a sweet spot where its around 10*-15*F variance right at the middle.
 

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Discussion Starter #718
I'll have to look over my logs again but if I recall, between 190 and 214°f the gauge sits in the "normal" spot. At 215° it jumps up a tick, pointing flat, then, at 225° (I think?) it's up near that 3/4 mark.

For those following along....

487830

"Normal" operating temperature is anywhere under the first red line.
 
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@aesthetic.rake I was thinking I would just pull the radiator, clean it well, and reinstall. But if it were you would you just put in a new OEM one? I guess this radiator is now 11 years old and is probably due for a change anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #720
@aesthetic.rake I was thinking I would just pull the radiator, clean it well, and reinstall. But if it were you would you just put in a new OEM one? I guess this radiator is now 11 years old and is probably due for a change anyway.
If there's ever any doubt--there is no doubt.

or

If in doubt--swap it out

:LOL:

You could pull the radiator out and clean it and see if that fixes your issues--then at that point decide if you want to put a new OEM unit in it or if you're comfortable running the OE radiator.

Alternatively, you could pick up a aftermarket denso or tyc radiator. There are clearly differences between new OEM and new aftermarket, as I showed in my photos. I wouldn't know how those subtle differences would equate to radiator/cooling efficiency. Maybe as much as 25%? Maybe ****-all? Sounds like you're in a hot area though, so that would be a tough call.

If it were me and money was no object, I'd do OEM radiator with new OEM hoses (both uppers and the lower) along with a new thermostat and not worry about it again. If money were a bit tight or I had expensive hobbies that I found more important, I might opt for an aftermarket radiator but I'd still swap out the two uppers and the lower with new OEM units as well as the thermostat. You could get hoses from Napa or where ever but they don't fit quite right--always seemed a little big.

If money were super tight, like it is for a lot of folks right now, I might just clean the radiator out as best I can and slap it all back together.
 
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