Subaru Outback Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of October's Outback of the Month Challenge!
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello folks,
Due to the conflicting information found on the web regarding engine proper break in procedure, I would like to ask your opinion on this matter.
Some sources direct to baby the engine for the first 1 - 3K miles, other suggest to accelerate and drive hard, third advocate moderating speed and engine load for the first 1K miles. It seems to be all related to the achievement of the proper ring settings vs oil consumption of the engine. Is this stuff still relevant nowadays with modern manufacturing process and tighter tolerances? How would you proceed with the proper break in of a brand new 3.6R Outback engine?
 

·
Registered
Tungsten 2017 2.5 Limited w Eyesight SOLD!
Joined
·
1,042 Posts
For the first 1000 miles I took it relatively easy on the car and kept to the schedule as per instructions in the owners manual and I didn't tow anything either. Don't keep the same engine RPM's for long periods of time. After 1500 miles I changed the engine oil and started towing and now at 36K miles the car is doing very fine. I average 22 MPG's city driving and 29-30 MPG on the highway. Car uses no oil and the transmission shifts like butter. At 30K miles I changed ALL the fluids in the car since it is rather hot down here and I tow a lot.
 

·
Registered
2013 Legacy Lim CVT Car: 2011 OB Prem 6MT Car: 2006 Miata GT 6MT mc: 2003 Honda GL1800A * Reunite Gondwanaland *
Joined
·
3,565 Posts

·
Meh.
I has wagons.
Joined
·
12,372 Posts
Your owner's manual outlines the break in procedure.

Use that.
 

·
Registered
'13 2.5Ltd w/EyeSight ::::: '02 2.5Ltd AT
Joined
·
95 Posts
AWDFTW is clearly part of the corporate conspiracy that wishes only for the planned obsolescence of your new ride, HB.

And please don't interpret Looby's advice as Reading The Flippin' Manual. No, he is clearly giving sage advice to Run The F*** out of that Mother. That's solid wisdom, my friend.

Run it like a bat out of He**!!! Stand on the gas and don't let off, but make sure you use the paddle shifters to keep it geared down!!! See if you can keep the RPMs in the sweet spot, usually around 5200.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,806 Posts
Funny given all the posts about this even back in the early 2000's the folks who beat the living **** out of their cars early all ended up with some oil consumption later. All my subarus I have stuck with the advice of those who actually designed and built them and have had ZERO issues. Random dude on the interweb or written word by the people who build and design the car? Hmmm? Is it really that hard to decide?
 

·
Registered
2011 Outback 3.6 Premium
Joined
·
721 Posts
Not being an automotive mechanical engineer, I'd go with the advice in the owners manual. It's the third choice on the OPs list, pretty much. That's what I did on the 3.6 and have had almost zero oil consumption.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Not being an automotive mechanical engineer, I'd go with the advice in the owners manual. It's the third choice on the OPs list, pretty much. That's what I did on the 3.6 and have had almost zero oil consumption.
What was your "almost zero" oil consumption in a new properly broken in 3.6R engine which you considered normal? In my current car with Duratec 3.0L V6 engine I did not see any oil consumption until it reached 125K miles. Then it was 1/2 quart every 3K miles until it hit 215K. At that mileage it started to waste one quart per 3K miles. Now, at 223K miles it's leaking fluids and falling apart. I was breaking in my old car while driving it on highways with varying speed 80 miles a day. Will it be an appropriate break in procedure for 3.6R Outback as well?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,806 Posts
What was your "almost zero" oil consumption in a new properly broken in 3.6R engine which you considered normal? In my current car with Duratec 3.0L V6 engine I did not see any oil consumption until it reached 125K miles. Then it was 1/2 quart every 3K miles until it hit 215K. At that mileage it started to waste one quart per 3K miles. Now, at 223K miles it's leaking fluids and falling apart. I was breaking in my old car while driving it on highways with varying speed 80 miles a day. Will it be an appropriate break in procedure for 3.6R Outback as well?
Read the owners manual.

I fail to see how a durajunk is any way related to a flat 6 built by different people.
 

·
Registered
'11 Outback 2.5i CVT - '06 Forester X 5MT
Joined
·
1,765 Posts
"Zero oil consumption" is a relative term too. If you never check your oil between fill ups, you'll never lose oil. If you're like me and happy to see the oil level between the 2 lines, you might not notice 1/8 or less of a quart between fill ups. Others are very anal and notice the slightest drop.

IMO "normal" consumption means you can go the specified mileage between fillups without adding oil or dropping below the min line on your dipstick.

But as everyone has mentioned. Go by what the engineers who designed the engine suggest.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Read the owners manual.

I fail to see how a durajunk is any way related to a flat 6 built by different people.
Either you're die hard Subaru zealot or had a negative experience with Duratec. The relation is simple, they both are internal combustion engines regardless of V6 or flat H6 configuration.
 

·
Registered
2011 Outback 3.6 Premium
Joined
·
721 Posts
My old Silverado with the venerable 5.7L had a similar oil usage experience as "Hunny Bunny" which I was happy with.

As for the ob, my "almost zero oil consumption" means that after 5000 miles the level on the dipstick appeared very close to where it was when the oil was first changed. Oil consumption appeared to be about a half-cup or less. Of course, I'm only at 20K miles so that could change.

However, during the first 1000 miles, IIRC, I did use about a quart of oil.
 

·
Meh.
I has wagons.
Joined
·
12,372 Posts
AWDFTW is clearly part of the corporate conspiracy that wishes only for the planned obsolescence of your new ride, HB.

And please don't interpret Looby's advice as Reading The Flippin' Manual. No, he is clearly giving sage advice to Run The F*** out of that Mother. That's solid wisdom, my friend.

Run it like a bat out of He**!!! Stand on the gas and don't let off, but make sure you use the paddle shifters to keep it geared down!!! See if you can keep the RPMs in the sweet spot, usually around 5200.
...I'm at a loss for words.

If you want to completely go against the guidelines specified by the folks that built the car, that's fine. Please don't suggest that to people who may want any relationship with their manufacture.

What's next, suggesting to drive with 4 mismatched tires to make the AWD work better?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
...I'm at a loss for words.

If you want to completely go against the guidelines specified by the folks that built the car, that's fine. Please don't suggest that to people who may want any relationship with their manufacture.

What's next, suggesting to drive with 4 mismatched tires to make the AWD work better?
I think it's -barely- possible that "scoobert" may have had his tongue inserted rather firmly in cheek.
 

·
Meh.
I has wagons.
Joined
·
12,372 Posts
Nonsense. Everyone knows that during the break-in period the car doesn't need all 4 tires.
...this forum needs a spit take smiley face. Just sayin'.:p
 

·
Registered
2013 Legacy Lim CVT Car: 2011 OB Prem 6MT Car: 2006 Miata GT 6MT mc: 2003 Honda GL1800A * Reunite Gondwanaland *
Joined
·
3,565 Posts
If you want to completely go against the guidelines specified by
the folks that built the car, that's fine. Please don't suggest that
to people who may want any relationship with their manufacture.
Suggest you get your satire detector recalibrated, AWDFTW -- or
maybe no one told you that satire and irony are illegal ...

...west of the Susquehanna,

Looby
 

·
Registered
2013 Outback 2.5 Premium 6mt
Joined
·
187 Posts
FWIW, the vehicles at my work never see a proper break in. They go from long times of idling in very hot weather to being ran hard back to idling and everything in between. We never run into oil consumption issues.

I recommend following the manual if possible. Vary the RPM's, slightly strain the engine by moderate acceleration to make sure the rings get seated (but not flooring it, revving it super high, or lugging it), spend time in all the gears if it is a manual transmission, etc. City driving works great for breaking in an engine because you are forced to do all of these things even if you try to be easy on the engine. I have followed the manual whenever I have a new personal vehicle and haven't had any oil burning issues. I also change my oil early on a new engine. Keep in mind that you aren't just breaking in the engine. You are also breaking in the transmission, ring and pinion gears, and all the way down to the break pads.

The second best break-in in my very humble opinion is to drive it like how you normally drive it (as long as you aren't a driver that always takes it to the redline). I'm sure demographics say that the majority of new vehicle buyers drive new vehicles like they normally drive and most vehicles don't run into oil burning issues until they get to very high miles (provided that proper maintenance is performed).

The worst break-in in my opinion is the method of running it crazy hard. Sport bike motorcycle owners seem to have the highest percentage of people that use this method. It is a huge debate in motorcycle forums. I look at it like this: I never had oil burning problems with an engine I broke in following the owners manual instructions. Why risk changing to a questionable method when an original method is already proven to work?

Finally, while engine break in is important, I don't think it is as critical as a lot of people think it is. Vehicles that are put into commercial use never get a proper break in yet they aren't smokey piles of junk after a few years just because of it. Look at all the OTR semi-trucks with a million miles or more that keep on going, all the police vehicles that don't use oil after 3 years of constant hard use, door to door delivery vehicles that you see day after day after day, etc. Maintenance and driving style is most critical factor to an engine's life.
 

·
Registered
2010 Silver 3.6R Premium
Joined
·
43 Posts
Hello folks,
Due to the conflicting information found on the web regarding engine proper break in procedure, I would like to ask your opinion on this matter.
Some sources direct to baby the engine for the first 1 - 3K miles, other suggest to accelerate and drive hard, third advocate moderating speed and engine load for the first 1K miles. It seems to be all related to the achievement of the proper ring settings vs oil consumption of the engine. Is this stuff still relevant nowadays with modern manufacturing process and tighter tolerances? How would you proceed with the proper break in of a brand new 3.6R Outback engine?
YIKES! conflicting information on the internet? Sheesh-Who'd a thunk it?


Anyway, wiseass remarks aside, I have and early build -7/09- 3.6 and all I did was drive it typically, change the oil at 3500 and follow the 7500 schedule subsequently. It uses no measurable oil at oil change.

Despite all the angst, expert opinions and urban legends abounding in cyberspace, how many cars do you see on the roadside because of "improper break-in" or "oil issues"? Probably about the same as the number of bodies I have to step over to get into a McDonald's to consume unhealthy food.

The only thing I would suggest is to pull the dipstick and check the level yourself, after an oil change.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
... how many cars do you see on the roadside because of "improper break-in" or "oil issues"? Probably about the same as the number of bodies I have to step over to get into a McDonald's to consume unhealthy food.
You may never know what exactly caused your engine to fail - erratic driving, lack of proper maintenance or lubrication problems. Everything contributes more or less to over all engine wear and tear. You can count those bodies in medical records where the cause of death associated with an unhealthy habit of eating junk food. Who knows, you may become one of those records as well.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top