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That's one interpritation. However, last I checked the breakdown lane and/or shoulder is intended for use by crippled vehicles or bicycles. Some areas are even marked as bike paths these days. So we are back to what a particular cop feels on a particular day.....
If it's marked as a bike path then no, you can't stop and use your phone there. But pulling a crippled vehicle into the breakdown lane isn't "travel" and if some cop wants to claim otherwise I'll happily be the test case for that.
 

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That's one interpritation. However, last I checked the breakdown lane and/or shoulder is intended for use by crippled vehicles or bicycles. Some areas are even marked as bike paths these days. So we are back to what a particular cop feels on a particular day.....
There is a lot of confusion. For example, someone told me that they heard from a cop that using an e-cig constitutes using an "electronic device" in a motor vehicle and is prohibited. I looked up the local statute, and that only pertains to electronic COMMUNICATION devices.

I don't know if the cop was making a joke, or badly misinformed (some cops aren't always the brightest bulbs), but it wouldn't be the first time that a cop behaved in a way that was contrary to the actual law, while thinking they're enforcing it.

By the way - this applies to people in every vocation - people sometimes get things wrong. It's not a criticism specific to law enforcement. People are just trying to do their jobs and don't always get it right, whether it's boots on the ground, or Boeing CEO's green-lighting cost-cutting in safety systems.
 

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2020 Legacy Touring XT
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Did I understand you that they don't work when you open the door? Well then, I won't miss them. That's what I want them for.
The footwell lights are tied to headlight parking and the logic doesn't make a lot of sense. If you have your lights on Auto and use the key fob to unlock the doors then the headlights come on and so do the foot lights. If you use the door handle to unlock the door the headlights do not come on until you start the engine. I guess Subaru's idea is the foot lights are for when driving, not getting in and out of the car. Also explains why they are so dim. Ideally there would be a second brighter light tied in with the dome light.
 

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I do really enjoy the Outback (which is my first Subaru) but on some of the finer points like this it seems like there's really something missing at Subaru especially when it comes to personal choice and providing options that are generally found in other cars at the same or even lesser price point. I don't really think it is about cost management; it seems more like a disconnect with American consumer preferences, analysis of Subaru's competitive set, and perhaps little or no investment by Subaru in ethnography here in North America.

Still, you gotta love the powertrain and chassis on the 2020; at least I do!
Answering your own thing here. Same price point, better powertrain/longevity, worse user interface.

If you upgrade what it lacks, you would no longer be at the same price point. If you want it all, you need to go to more expensive cars.
 

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2020 Touring XT
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Answering your own thing here. Same price point, better powertrain/longevity, worse user interface.

If you upgrade what it lacks, you would no longer be at the same price point. If you want it all, you need to go to more expensive cars.

Nah. My Murano Platinum was less OTD and had more. But I do like how the Outback handles much better
 

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If you upgrade what it lacks, you would no longer be at the same price point. If you want it all, you need to go to more expensive cars.
Very much agreed about this statement. The 2020 Outback Touring XT is an almost there but not quite vehicle. Let's assume someone is interested in the 2020 Touring XT for 41,400 MSRP. The Volvo XC40 starts at 33,700 and the MB GLC 4Matic starts at 44,500. To me, the XC40 is a better dollar for dollar choice than the Outback, especially when equipped with the Advanced Package and heated steering wheel which brings it to 41,050 with a better warranty, complimentary service, and traditional transmission. For 3000 more, get the MB GLC or the XC60.
 

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And you can play that game up to a $70k vehicle.

Personally I prefer a company that puts its $$$ into longevity of critical working parts over being at the leading edge in the "features" war.
 

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Personally I prefer a company that puts its $$$ into longevity of critical working parts over being at the leading edge in the "features" war.
Absolutely. I buy a Subaru for the outward visibility, engineering of the chassis and drivetrain, not because of the amenities or styling.
 

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Personally I prefer a company that puts its $$$ into longevity of critical working parts over being at the leading edge in the "features" war.
Which brand or vehicle would that be? Per Consumer Reports, Subaru is #7. I think this quote from Consumer Reports sums up the 2020 Outback the best, "When you redesign a new vehicle, often you get better fuel economy, better safety, potentially better features," said Jake Fisher, senior director of auto testing for Consumer Reports. "But if you want ... reliability, your best bet is to wait a year or two until those initial growing pains have been worked out." The amount of change from the 2019 to the 2020 Outback still requires some quality control adjustments along with usability reworking. I previously had owned a 2017 3.6 Limited but got rid of it because it was too rough around the edges. The 2020 Touring XT is much better compared to the 2017 - 2019 models, but still not quite ready for general availability. The execution of the 11" infotainment is my largest complaint but wind noise in the front of a Touring XT is still very high compared to slightly more expensive competitors. The roughness of the CVT when cold is surprisingly unrefined and clunky. I hope the 2021 Outback Touring XT will be the vehicle to wait for. Hopefully they will bring back the streamlined roof rails from the 2019 Touring along with introducing a digital dash display to make up for the shortcomings of the 11" center console display. Just to put things in perspective, my first Subaru was a 1984 GL wagon with the digital display. As a child, always wondered why other manufacturers didn't do all digital displays. Here we are now 35 years later and competitors have gone full digital and left Subaru behind. Especially when it comes to EV vehicles. Yes, I am aware that Toyota has a stake in Subaru.

 

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Which brand or vehicle would that be? Per Consumer Reports, Subaru is #7. I think this quote from Consumer Reports sums up the 2020 Outback the best, "When you redesign a new vehicle, often you get better fuel economy, better safety, potentially better features," said Jake Fisher, senior director of auto testing for Consumer Reports. "But if you want ... reliability, your best bet is to wait a year or two until those initial growing pains have been worked out." The amount of change from the 2019 to the 2020 Outback still requires some quality control adjustments along with usability reworking. I previously had owned a 2017 3.6 Limited but got rid of it because it was too rough around the edges. The 2020 Touring XT is much better compared to the 2017 - 2019 models, but still not quite ready for general availability. I suspect the 2021 Outback Touring XT will be the vehicle to wait for. Hopefully they will bring back the streamlined roof rails too along with introducing a digital dash display to make up for the shortcomings of the 11" center console display.

Excellent points, though the Global Platform in general has been out for years, the 2.4 specifically has been in the Ascent for a year, the transmission is a decade old (with refinements). Subaru's AWD system is tried and true. When it comes to amenities and infotainment "features", yes a new subaru will have glitches, and those kinds of issues ding Subaru, but not so much for the meat and bones of the vehicle itself.
 

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Excellent points, though the Global Platform in general has been out for years, the 2.4 specifically has been in the Ascent for a year, the transmission is a decade old (with refinements). Subaru's AWD system is tried and true. When it comes to amenities and infotainment "features", yes a new subaru will have glitches, and those kinds of issues ding Subaru, but not so much for the meat and bones of the vehicle itself.
That was my hope as well before taking the plunge, but the crux is the 11" infotainment that debuted with the 2020 Outback. It is mostly the execution of the Infotainment / technology that has hamstrung Subaru for this generation. Wondering if the 2021 Forester will get the 11" screen and 2.4 before the 2020 OB 11" is fixed. More than likely will be revealed at the NYC Auto Show. From a technology perspective, it does not seem a software update can fix the 2020 11" infotainment system (forward and backup camera quality, Car Play restrictions, Car Play size, menu depth, controls being buried in the 11" screen) especially because of aspect ratios. The "easy out" would be to introduce a second screen for the dash like Volvo and MB.
 

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That was my hope as well before taking the plunge, but the crux is the 11" infotainment that debuted with the 2020 Outback. It is mostly the execution of the Infotainment / technology that has hamstrung Subaru for this generation. Wondering if the 2021 Forester will get the 11" screen and 2.4 before the 2020 OB 11" is fixed. More than likely will be revealed at the NYC Auto Show. From a technology perspective, it does not seem a software update can fix the 2020 11" infotainment system, especially because of aspect ratios. The "easy out" would be to introduce a second screen for the dash like Volvo and MB.
Infotainment has been Subaru's Achilles heel either way. They're damned if they do and damned if they don't. By sticking with basic functions, they get criticized for outdated and crappy infotainment that reeks of being stuck in the 90's, but it works. They switch vendors and try to jump into the deep end of the pool, but instead of making a graceful splash, it's a belly flop. Subaru didn't really design or build the infotainment - they don't have that kind of technical expertise. Their expertise is in the engine, transmission, chassis.
 

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Infotainment has been Subaru's Achilles heel either way. They're damned if they do and damned if they don't. By sticking with basic functions, they get criticized for outdated and crappy infotainment that reeks of being stuck in the 90's, but it works. They switch vendors and try to jump into the deep end of the pool, but instead of making a graceful splash, it's a belly flop. Subaru didn't really design or build the infotainment - they don't have that kind of technical expertise. Their expertise is in the engine, transmission, chassis.
This is pretty much true for all Japanese automakers. The infotainment system is just something on a long list of things they have to check off for marketing purposes. Outsourcing that work to another company so they can keep cost down while focusing on maintaining a reliable powertrain and safe platform. If the infotainment supports CarPlay/Android Auto I'm already happy and don't expect much more.
 
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Whether subaru meets that standard is open to debate. The one I'm trading went 200k miles with no issues. Awesome on brakes and tires. Change the fluids. Strikes the right balance on mileage, off road, family haul-ability. Jack of sll trades.

My point is keep that recipe, keep it available in the high 20's/low 30's (No touring trims here, thanks). And I'll largely overlook a clunky info-tainment. I may complain about it, lol. But I replaced an Outback with an Outback.

But Subaru has had it's share of actual issues over time. From head gaskets to oil burning to cracked windshields. These are black eyes, IMO. The info-tainment issues have been constant but are minor in comparison.
 

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This is pretty much true for all Japanese automakers. The infotainment system is just something on a long list of things they have to check off for marketing purposes. Outsourcing that work to another company so they can keep cost down while focusing on maintaining a reliable powertrain and safe platform. If the infotainment supports CarPlay/Android Auto I'm already happy and don't expect much more.
"Supports" is the primary rub as it is a ambiguous term. Posted this in the Massachusetts thread, "It makes me wonder with the focus of in car technology, if there should be a grading system or include the features as part of the vehicle specifications sheet. What I mean by that is if if there are zero restrictions on Car Play, it receives a Gold or Full Car Play rating. If most features are in tact, but in the case of Subaru removing the dial pad for making a call, then it gets a Silver, Bronze, or Lite with a indication of what features do not work. Otherwise, it is potential false advertisement saying that a vehicle has Apple Car Play but some features are removed."
 

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For android auto, the not letting you dial on screen is annoying. By no means a game changer for me.

When my Onyx comes in, it will be the first car I've ever had with Android auto. On my current car, I do conference calls and such occasionally, and bluetooth calls a lot. For most friends, I used voice commands to make calls. And if they call me, you just pick up on the steering wheel. I'm pretty sure I'll still be able to do that. But for conference calls I had to pull over, dial in, put in the numbers and such on my phone, and then drive. I wasn't sure how it will work in this car, but from what I'm understanding, it will be the same. Oh well.

My main interest in android auto is maps. I got a no-nav version, and am hoping I can run maps from the phone onto the screen. If it doesn't work, then I guess I'll buy a $100 garmin, which is still way better than the $1800 the dealer wanted for navigation installed. Likely be a better system than OEM anyway.
 

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Very much agreed about this statement. The 2020 Outback Touring XT is an almost there but not quite vehicle. Let's assume someone is interested in the 2020 Touring XT for 41,400 MSRP. The Volvo XC40 starts at 33,700 and the MB GLC 4Matic starts at 44,500. To me, the XC40 is a better dollar for dollar choice than the Outback, especially when equipped with the Advanced Package and heated steering wheel which brings it to 41,050 with a better warranty, complimentary service, and traditional transmission. For 3000 more, get the MB GLC or the XC60.
But both the XC40 and XC60 are much smaller vehicles. Cargo volumes are more like the Crosstrek than the Outback (actually both Volvos are considerably smaller than the Crosstrek with both rows folded). They're just not in the same size class as the OB:

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2020 Volvo XC40
20.7 ft³, 47.2 ft³ with seat area

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2020 Volvo V60
23.2 ft³, 50.9 ft³ with seat area

2020 Subaru Crosstrek/Cargo volume

20.8 ft³, 55.3 ft³ with seat area

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[/URL]
https://www.google.com/search?sxsrf=ALeKk03bxanJRbr738lyJL6EwCDnSYMisA:1582563729465&q=2020+volvo+v60+cargo+volume&stick=H4sIAAAAAAAAAONgFuLVT9c3NMwwSbYsT0qvVIJzkwyyk8y1-Jzzc3Pz84IzU1LLEyuLFzGqZSdb6SeWluTn5pdklqXq5-anpObEV6YmFlklJxal58eX5eeU5qYuYpU2MjAyUADyyvIVyswMFMCyChBZAH0AnfR3AAAA&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiKl7en1ernAhUCeKwKHb7FAtsQxA0wA3oECBAQCA&sxsrf=ALeKk03bxanJRbr738lyJL6EwCDnSYMisA:1582563729465
 

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For android auto, the not letting you dial on screen is annoying. By no means a game changer for me.

When my Onyx comes in, it will be the first car I've ever had with Android auto. On my current car, I do conference calls and such occasionally, and bluetooth calls a lot. For most friends, I used voice commands to make calls. And if they call me, you just pick up on the steering wheel. I'm pretty sure I'll still be able to do that. But for conference calls I had to pull over, dial in, put in the numbers and such on my phone, and then drive. I wasn't sure how it will work in this car, but from what I'm understanding, it will be the same. Oh well.
If you call the same conference call numbers, you should be able to name them and enter the number in your contacts, followed by two commas ",," and then the PIN code. Inserting each comma pauses two seconds before entering the next numbers. At least it works this way on an iPhone. I used it to call into conference calls, or enter extension numbers for voice dialing. I found two commas usually worked fine to allow the number to answer and ask for the code.
 
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