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Discussion Starter #1
I am trying to make sense of the Subaru Service Manual for the timing belt change on a 2002 outback manual and had a few questions. It talks about the tightning angle of the crankshaft pully bolt, and I saw a small scale on the timing belt cover. What does this mean?, isnt the bolt just tightened with a torque wrench while holding the pully with the tool to prevent it from moving while tightning the bolt? It also says conduct the tightening procedures by confirming the turning angle of the crankshaft pulley bolt referring to the gauge indicated on the belt cover. Could someone translate this all into english for a novice?

The other point that I needed help on was where it says

CAUTION:
After properly installing timing belt, remove
rocker cover and ensure that the valve lash
adjuster contains no air.

Could someone translate this also


Thanks.

2002 Outback 2.5 Manual
 

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01 Outback H6 VDC, 97 GT wgn w/ ej22, 98 OBW w/ej22
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isnt the bolt just tightened with a torque wrench while holding the pully with the tool to prevent it from moving while tightning the bolt?
this is crap. and it has come up before. just ignore it.
i do not know who wrote it or what year car they wrote it for but it is not correct for the 02 outback ej25 engine.

torque it to 135 ft. lbs and you are done.
the 02 ej25 has solid screw and lock nut lash adjusters.
 

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Car: 2008 Tribeca, 2010 LGT, Sold: 2005 XT Limited
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About the crankshaft pulley bolt - I had the same question on my 05. The FSM says torque it to a light torque (can't remember exactly how much), then torque to full torque and make sure the bolt turns xx number of degrees. If it turns less, then replace the bolt. This is to make sure that the preload is in the stretch of the bolt, not in the friction of the threads. However, most people said just do what canubaru says to do. It's unlikely to be a problem. But if you are getting parts, you might as well get a new crankshaft pulley bolt just for piece of mind.

Tom
 

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2008 Outback 2.5i, 2009 Forrester 2.5 sohc
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606 Posts
I am trying to make sense of the Subaru Service Manual for the timing belt change on a 2002 outback manual and had a few questions. It talks about the tightning angle of the crankshaft pully bolt, and I saw a small scale on the timing belt cover. What does this mean?, isnt the bolt just tightened with a torque wrench while holding the pully with the tool to prevent it from moving while tightning the bolt? It also says conduct the tightening procedures by confirming the turning angle of the crankshaft pulley bolt referring to the gauge indicated on the belt cover. Could someone translate this all into english for a novice?

The other point that I needed help on was where it says

CAUTION:
After properly installing timing belt, remove
rocker cover and ensure that the valve lash
adjuster contains no air.

Could someone translate this also


Thanks.

2002 Outback 2.5 Manual
When you ask how to correctly torque a bolt you can get as many opinions as asking whats the best motor oil. Tightening by angle theory is its more accurate, 90 degrees is 90 degrees regardless of lubricant on or dirt on the threads, the tension will be the same. I would buy a new bolt, and torque to the spec value with a wrench.
 

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2005 OBW 2.5 5speed
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Just put the bolt in and tighten it up. Engineers sit around and worry too much, dreaming of ways to complicate things.
 

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2001 VDC/SC One of a Kind
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Just put the bolt in and tighten it up. Engineers sit around and worry too much, dreaming of ways to complicate things.
Not!

Someone wasn't paying attention to what they were writing up for repair. Or maybe it was a translation error from Japanese to English. Maybe someone was having a bad day and said "f*$k it".

Without the engineers, you would still be on a horse.
 

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1993 Legacy LSi with still functioning Air Suspension, 1999 Outback 2.5L 5MT lab Rat
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The 2 torque procedure is designed to insure that the bolt turns tight. If the Bolt Does not turn at least 65 degrees it is because it has bottomed in the bore and the Harmonic Balancer is NOT sufficiently tight. Look closely at the bolt end and you will se a fair amount of casting slag As the bolt stretches this can inhibit tightening. Having read this when I first began repairing Subaru's and having contact with Subaru's engineers it is NOT a Translation error. I have seen what happens when this doesn't happen and in fact it was how I purchased my 1st Subaru. Balancer worked loose sripped Woodruff key and its bore from Crankshaft, customer preferred to sell the car to Paying to replace their crankshaft, woodruff key and Balancer. Replacing the bolt is a cheap insurance but I would still suggest following the appropriate tightening/torquing procedure.

For the Layman, Procedure as follows,
1. clean bore threads (with air)
2. lubricate bolt seat and threads with engine oil (clean)
3. tighten the crankshaft pulley bolt to 33 lb.ft. ( 44 Nm )
4. further tighten the bolt to 130.4 lb.ft. ( 177 Nm ) During this step make sure the bolt turns at least 65 degrees or more, if the bolt does not turn at least 65 Deg. Replace bolt and start over at 1.

( this is directly from the 2002 Outback 2.5L service manual )
 

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2001 VDC/SC One of a Kind
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14,322 Posts
I was being sarcastic about translation.

At the same time, the bolt is cheap. No foul in replacing it and it insures that you aren't using a stretched bolt. Same with head bolts if you ever get into that. And when your livelihood relies on time management vs cost, it is more efficient to replace skeptical hardware over having to go in again.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I was being sarcastic about translation.

At the same time, the bolt is cheap. No foul in replacing it and it insures that you aren't using a stretched bolt. Same with head bolts if you ever get into that. And when your livelihood relies on time management vs cost, it is more efficient to replace skeptical hardware over having to go in again.

Thanks for the advice. I ordered a new crank bolt. I had the timing belt done at the dealer last year but they recommended not doing the rest. I decided to error on the side of caution and go back in and do everything else so I just ordered the idlers and tensioner. I was not in a position to change the belt by my self last year but now have a place to do the work.
 
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