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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey, this is my first time doing a timing belt on my 99Outback (MT). I made sure to line up all marks on my engine block with the camshaft and each Cam Sprocket to each other, etc. This is for a DOHC EJ25 that has 166000 miles. I will provide picture below to hopefully explain my problem.
Once I removed the old belt, Idlers' and tensions and knowing that none of my Cam Sprockets moved during that process. I notice that the double line alignment markers that line up the exhaust cam with the intake cam was not correct. More specifically the intake Camshaft sprocket is rotated a full 180 degrees or backwards. From the diagram provide by the FSM.
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Let me Know if I should not worry about this or if my anxiety was worth it. I can rotate the intake camshaft about 70% of the way before I feel resistance and I don't wat my valves to hit I do force it. Not sure if I should be worried about that if my Crank Sprocket is at Top Dead Center.

Thank you, CJMD
 

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01 VDC, 05 R Sedan, 06 BAJA EJ257
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As long as your crankshaft sprocket timing mark is on spot then the Pistons are down and you can rotate the camshaft sprockets to line them up for timing. I suggest that you use a breaker bar with a 17 mm socket to turn the camshaft past the load of the spring and when you get close to where the timing mark is supposed to be grip it good so it doesn't snap out of your hands and try to balance the shaft where it's supposed to be.

There's a tool to hold those two cams sprockets in place while you do the timing belt, but I guess it's a bit late for that, otherwise you wouldn't be making this post.
 

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Outback 2011 3.6R Premium (sold Jan 22)
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Further to what Cardoc said.

Yes you do have to worry as if you reassemble with the current camshaft alignment you will cause engine damage.

Once you remove the timing belt, the camshafts freely move to their point of least resistance which is why the alignment is currently wrong.

Please make sure you have the crankshaft sprocket at the “timing belt mark” NOT Top Dead Centre as this ensures the pistons and valves cannot clash during a timing belt change.

Once you have the crankshaft and camshafts correctly aligned AND you have the timing belt, idler pulleys and tensioner installed make sure you turn over the engine at least two full revolutions BY HAND using a breaker bar BEFORE you put tge covers back on and try and start the engine. This should ensure no damage will be done to the engine when trying to start it.

If you are unsure about what you are doing take the time now to assure yourself of what needs to be aligned as this will hopefully prevent engine damage.

By the way it is good to have a trained octopus to help with getting everything aligned and held in place while you install the timing belt.

Hope this helps,

Seagrass
 

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I use something like these to do a timing belt. Makes life alot easier.

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Also.. take your spark plugs out and you don't need the breaker bar to turn the engine . Doing a double turn .. or three is really compulsory.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Further to what Cardoc said.

Yes you do have to worry as if you reassemble with the current camshaft alignment you will cause engine damage.

Once you remove the timing belt, the camshafts freely move to their point of least resistance which is why the alignment is currently wrong.

Please make sure you have the crankshaft sprocket at the “timing belt mark” NOT Top Dead Centre as this ensures the pistons and valves cannot clash during a timing belt change.

Once you have the crankshaft and camshafts correctly aligned AND you have the timing belt, idler pulleys and tensioner installed make sure you turn over the engine at least two full revolutions BY HAND using a breaker bar BEFORE you put tge covers back on and try and start the engine. This should ensure no damage will be done to the engine when trying to start it.

If you are unsure about what you are doing take the time now to assure yourself of what needs to be aligned as this will hopefully prevent engine damage.

By the way it is good to have a trained octopus to help with getting everything aligned and held in place while you install the timing belt.

Hope this helps,

Seagrass
my crankshaft is aligned like the diagram show above. Is this in timing like you mentioned? Or In TDC? I have this picture as my current mark.
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Thank you for the help.
 

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01 VDC, 05 R Sedan, 06 BAJA EJ257
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Yes. The triangle pointed to the right indicates pistons down.
Take the belt guard off and reinstall it after the belt is on. Be sure to get the guard adjusted with the proper distance from the belt. Your timing kit may have a plastic gauge with it.
 
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