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Discussion Starter #1
1998 Subaru Outback. Original problem was that the crank pulley bolt loosened and the pulley walked buggering the woodruff key and a bit of the keyway. I removed the timing belt with the cam sprockets properly lined. The keyway on the crankshaft sprocket was at 180 degrees with everything in alignment.

With the belt off I turned the crankshaft sprocket 180 degrees to have access to the woodruff key. Somehow the cam sprockets on the drivers side rotated out of position. And now, although I can move them about 45 degrees I find resistance if I attempt to put them in the proper position.

I have some ideas but I'm not sure how to proceed. Does anyone have a solution?

Thanks,

Tim
 

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2014 OBW 3.6R Limited, 1997 OBW 2.5L Auto (sold, but not forgotten), and 1991 Ford F150
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The upper driver's side (intake) cam sprocket will be under significant spring pressure when rotating it to line up the marks ... there's no getting around that. As long as the crank sprocket and the lower driver's side (exhaust) cam sprocket are lined up correctly, you are not going to hurt anything.

From the front of the car facing the engine, you should be turning the intake cam sprocket clockwise to the aligned position. You will probably need to hold it there with a breaker bar or closed-end wrench while you install the belt. Don't use a ratchet as it may spin back on you.

Install the belt in the following order:
-crank sprocket
-upper smooth idler pulley
-passenger side upper cam sprocket
-tensioner pulley
-driver side upper cam sprocket
-driver side lower cam sprocket
-water pump
-toothed idler sprocket
-lower passenger side cam sprocket
-install lower smooth idler pulley

About the time the belt reaches the driver side lower cam sprocket, you can release the wrench on the upper sprocket and it will stay in place.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks RL,

My understanding now is once both the crank sprocket and drivers side exhaust sprocket are in position I'll be able to turn the upper (intake I assume) sprocket clockwise into position without damaging the vehicle.

This answer begs the next question, the drivers side lower cam (exhaust) sprocket is out of position as well as you probably read. With the crank sprocket in line will I be able to align the the lower drivers side cam sprocket prior to aligning the upper cam sprocket without damaging the vehicle? There's appears to be a fair amount of resistance although I haven't put any real torque on it.

Thanks,

T
 

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With the crank sprocket in line will I be able to align the the lower drivers side cam sprocket prior to aligning the upper cam sprocket without damaging the vehicle?
Yes. There will be some resistance on the lower sprocket, but not nearly as much as on the upper sprocket and once positioned it should stay there by itself. Also, you should turn the lower sprocket counter-clockwise into position.

As a side note: I don't believe you can damage anything when turning by hand. If things get out of alignment while the engine is running, valves could be bent. Those valves are pretty tough, though. The pressure you may put on them with a wrench is not going to damage them as long as you don't go crazy.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hey just wanted to say that I got everything back together. It took me a little while as I was working outside and I needed a couple of warm days to give the Loctite 660 Quick Metal a chance to cure, luckily the keyway wasn't to badly buggered.

The advice you gave me about turning the cam sprockets was spot on. That timing belt was a PITA but I got it on with everything lined up correctly. It seems really easy to miss count and be off by a tooth the way this things set up, if I ever have to remove it again I'm buying cam sprocket clamps.

I also pulled the oil pump while I had access to it and replaced the o-ring as I had (and maybe still have) an oil leak. What I found when I pulled it off was that the screws on the face of the oil pump had become really loose. In fact one or two of them were significantly backed out so I applied some red Loctite and tightened them.

Conclusion; the cars back on the road again and running great, not missing or throwing any codes. Thanks for your help RL.

Tim
 
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