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2016 Outback 2.5i Limited
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Discussion Starter #1
I was thinking about getting a set of wheels and dedicated winter tires on my 2011 Outback, which currently has the stock Conti's in 225/60R17 size. A guy is selling a set of wheels with Michelin Pilot Alpin tires for only $250.00 which seems like a good deal.

My question is this. His tires are in size 225/55R17, which are wider aspect tires. Does anyone have experience putting these size tires on their newer model Outbacks. Would the wider tires cause any problems or just stick out a little bit into wheelwells?
 

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2011 Subie 3.6R Limited 2013 Cmax e=nergi PHEV
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I was thinking about getting a set of wheels and dedicated winter tires on my 2011 Outback, which currently has the stock Conti's in 225/60R17 size. A guy is selling a set of wheels with Michelin Pilot Alpin tires for only $250.00 which seems like a good deal.

My question is this. His tires are in size 225/55R17, which are wider aspect tires. Does anyone have experience putting these size tires on their newer model Outbacks. Would the wider tires cause any problems or just stick out a little bit into wheelwells?

Aren't those just a tad shorter sidewall? 55 vs the stock 60% of 225 width. If so, there will be more room in the well for ice and snow and less rubber. My uneducated guess is that it is probably a decent deal if the rims are good and the tires are too. Good luck. Out of curiosity are they steel rims or something fancy? What do the pilot alpines normally run ~$150-180?
 

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2010 2.5i Outback, 2015 2.5i Legacy w/Eyesight
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Aren't those just a tad shorter sidewall? 55 vs the stock 60% of 225 width.
Correctamundo sir. Tires are defined as A/B/C:
A. The widest point of tire (typically somewhere in the middle of the sidewall)
B. Sidewall aspect ratio as a percentage of the widest point of the tire
C. Rim diameter


My uneducated guess is that it is probably a decent deal if the rims are good and the tires are too.
That's a decent deal for just the rims if they're in good shape (I'm guessing they're not steel wheels since I have yet to see steel wheels larger than 16") and a great deal if the tires have at least a usable season left on them. $62.50 for rims alone is only $4.50 more than tire rack sells new 16" steel wheels. One important thing about the snow tires though, make sure they aren't worn past the usable snow tread depth. At that price, I would more than likely guess the tires are worthless in the snow, but it still might be worth it to get the rims and toss a new set of snow tires on if you want.

I personally went with 16" rims since the tires are typically at least $10-$20 a tire cheaper and they come in more desirable aspect ratios for snow. The old adage for snow tires is to go with a narrower section width (the first number) to increase the pressure and bite into the snow while increasing the sidewall aspect ratio (second number) to achieve roughly the same wheel diameter (I'm running 215/70/16's on my 2010).
 

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2016 Outback 2.5i Limited
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Discussion Starter #4
The wheels look pretty decent and so do the tires. It will sit slightly lower with the 55 aspect tires I've been told but they should work. Next year I could get a new set installed. You are right, even for just the wheels it would be a good deal.
3E33Fb3lf5I95Hd5Mccbr0c8711dcc3f11bf4.jpg
 

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2013 Outback Limited 2.5 EyeSight & 2010 Legacy Premium, 2010 OB Limited (traded)
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Just be aware your TPMS light will be on and the system won't function for the winter. Not a big deal but something to be aware of.
 

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2010 2.5i Outback, 2015 2.5i Legacy w/Eyesight
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The wheels look pretty decent and so do the tires. It will sit slightly lower with the 55 aspect tires I've been told but they should work. Next year I could get a new set installed. You are right, even for just the wheels it would be a good deal.
View attachment 26209
One other thing. Make sure the rims support the right lug pattern (5x100) otherwise it'll be a total wash.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The guy claims he had them on his 2009 Outback, maybe somebody knows if that year used the proper bolt/hub pattern.
 

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2006 Outback Wagon 2.5i 5spd MT Atlantic Blue Pearl
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2009 was still Gen 3, which uses 5x100. Stock offset was 48, but 55 works fine (my 97 LGT stockers that I use for my snow tires have a 55 offset). I don't know about the hub bore or wheel width....cars101.com might have that info.
 

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The guy claims he had them on his 2009 Outback, maybe somebody knows if that year used the proper bolt/hub pattern.
Most probably good to go then, but it wouldn't hurt to double check since people sometimes do things they shouldn't. Almost all the Subaru rims are interchangeable apart from the some of the WRX and Tribeca rims which use a different bolt pattern.
 

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M12x1.25mm tapered/cone seat lugnuts.<O:p</O:p
OEM 17x7 +48mm offset.<O:p</O:p
56.1mm hub bore, larger than and you’ll need a centering ring.<O:p</O:p
 

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2011 Subie 3.6R Limited 2013 Cmax e=nergi PHEV
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Nice looking rims that wont hold a ton of icy crud and gravel. Post a pick with em on if you pull the trigger. Don't know jack about snow tires except they don't last long, but the tread on the pic you posted looks like it has a winter or two left.
 

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As a rule of thumb, you want NARROWER tires in the snow and wider in dry conditions. The idea is to orient the broadest part of the footprint on the axis that needs the most grip. In the snow, you need starting traction, so a long narrow footprint works better. In the dry, your concern is cornering, so a short wide footprint is desirable.
 

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As a rule of thumb, you want NARROWER tires in the snow and wider in dry conditions. The idea is to orient the broadest part of the footprint on the axis that needs the most grip. In the snow, you need starting traction, so a long narrow footprint works better. In the dry, your concern is cornering, so a short wide footprint is desirable.
Same thing for mud. However the really big heavy diesel pickups generally need large wide tires to keep them from sinking to their floor boards due to weight.
 
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