Subaru Outback Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!

2007 Outback 2.5, automatic. Transmission is a 4EAT I guess?

Tight turns (low speed of course) in either direction give me loud very low pitched grumbling and a feeling of resistance. My best guess from googling and searching here is that this is what is called "torque bind."

When I put a fuse in the "2WD" location, the problem goes away completely.

Is that definitive of a bad solenoid, or could it be the clutch itself? Or...? If solenoid, how hard is it to get to on this model? I understand that it moved around over the years in 4EATS...

Thank you for any advice!

Mark
 

·
Premium Member
(formerly) 03 H6 OBW , (presently) 06 WRX Sportwagon & 2021 Honda CR-V
Joined
·
19,599 Posts
solenoid is working.

has the car had a transmission or rear diff. swap?

are the tires all the same brand/model/size?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
solenoid is working.

has the car had a transmission or rear diff. swap?

are the tires all the same brand/model/size?
Thank you.

Tires are all same batch, and look fine still. No swaps. This came on gradually over a month or two. I'm afraid the transmission fluid has been neglected recently, maybe since before I bought the car 50K miles ago (there are 150K on it).
 

·
Premium Member
01 VDC, 05 R Sedan, 06 BAJA EJ257
Joined
·
18,806 Posts
The duty C solenoid is relatively cheap and easy to replace on that transmission. There's a 90% chance that change in that solenoid will correct your problem if it's only been going on for a short while.



You'll need about 6 qts of Subaru HP or Idemitsu HP fluid. More if you want to do a few drain and fills after fixing the solenoid.

Here is the service manual. 140.16 MB file on MEGA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you. That does look like a pretty straightforward procedure, and you've kindly supplied everything I need to know how to do it.

I already see in this thread something that puzzled me in searching about this issue. One member says that from what I've described it seems the solenoid is working. Another says that there is a high chance that the solenoid is the cause of the issue. Is this a controversial diagnostic point or maybe I am misunderstanding something (very likely)?
 

·
Premium Member
(formerly) 03 H6 OBW , (presently) 06 WRX Sportwagon & 2021 Honda CR-V
Joined
·
19,599 Posts
to me, the fact that use of the FWD fuse alleviates the problem, should mean the solenoid is working. If it did not help the problem , then I'd suggest the solenoid or , maybe, the wet clutch discs are hanging in the 'basket'. But, I would have to defer to cardoc. He is a pro mech. It could be , that the change in pressure control from gen2 to gen 3 is why he feels the solenoid may be at fault.
 

·
Premium Member
01 VDC, 05 R Sedan, 06 BAJA EJ257
Joined
·
18,806 Posts
Putting the fuse in the FWD slot keeps the computer from engaging the all-wheel drive. If the binding was still there with the fuse inserted it indicates that the clutches are bound up and the center differential is locked up which causes the binding when you turn slow. If this were the case then you would be changing out the differential clutches. Putting the fuse in does not indicate that the solenoid works, or whether or not it's working all the time.

Solenoid function relies on its condition and how it reacts with temperature. There's also a matter of whether or not there's debris in the system that might be affecting the solenoid operation, or wear inside the solenoid that might be causing the solenoid to hang up keeping the clutches applied in the center differential.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Putting the fuse in the FWD slot keeps the computer from engaging the all-wheel drive. If the binding was still there with the fuse inserted it indicates that the clutches are bound up and the center differential is locked up which causes the binding when you turn slow. If this were the case then you would be changing out the differential clutches. Putting the fuse in does not indicate that the solenoid works, or whether or not it's working all the time.

Solenoid function relies on its condition and how it reacts with temperature. There's also a matter of whether or not there's debris in the system that might be affecting the solenoid operation, or wear inside the solenoid that might be causing the solenoid to hang up keeping the clutches applied in the center differential.
Ah, this is great clarity. I've ordered the part and will report back!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Reporting back. I was running on FWD and soon noticed vibration (felt on the steering wheel) while accelerating (only). Starting to diagnose that, I pulled the FWD fuse to check whether maybe the vibration was really there in AWD as well and went unnoticed. But, no vibration! And not only that, the torque bind symptoms have vanished in AWD as well. I guess replacing the ATF did something or other?

I'll hang onto the solenoid when it arrives. If anyone sees this thread and needs it I'll cut you a deal :).
 

·
Premium Member
(formerly) 03 H6 OBW , (presently) 06 WRX Sportwagon & 2021 Honda CR-V
Joined
·
19,599 Posts
i have read of many folks having done trans fluid changes and had good results with delayed engagement and other problems. Just doing drain and fills, due to the TC holding a lot of fluid, 3 changes gets you over 80% new fluid.

when you're under the car, look for any dents in the trans pan. critical parts are only a few mm above the pan inside.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top