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2019 3.6R Touring
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Discussion Starter #1
We have a 2019 Outback 3.6R Touring. We're considering purchasing a Happier Camper Traveler. The base weight of the version we'd like to get is ~2,500 lbs. I see that the tow capacity of the Outback 3.6R is 2,700 lbs. Will we be able to pull this trailer? If the base weight is 2,500 lbs, I'm assuming it would be at least 100-200 lbs. heavier when all loaded up?

Thanks.
 

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2017 3.6R Limited with Eyesight
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If you have never pulled a trailer you will be surprised how quickly the weight increases. Things like cooking equipment and chairs add up quickly. I would say that you need a larger towing capacity or smaller trailer. I was looking to do the same thing but the options are limited and $$$.
Beware of those that will chime in to say it's fine. Someone on the other side of the Internet isn't going to drop everything to come help you on the side of the road or help with the repair expenses you are risking.
Best of luck.
 

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2019 Subaru Outback
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Their website is showing an old Impreza towing one of their campers.
Which means little. They want to sell their product.

I'll say the same thing I said in another recent thread. In addition to the max tow capacity, which your should not exceed but otherwise means little, you need to look at what your vehicle's payload capacity is (basically it's unloaded as built weight versus maxumum weight) and max tongue weight (if there even is such a stat--probably not all that important for such a light trailer), although note tongue weight counts as cargo weight for the tow vehicle.

For my pickup truck and me, my wife, cat and cargo, we max out the payload at about a 4,500 pound loaded trailer even though the max tow rating for the truck is 7,600.
 

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2016 Outback Premium 2.5 CVT w/EyeSight+SRVD
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2008 OB Limited 2.5i, Portland OR USA
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Their website is showing an old Impreza towing one of their campers.
And some will show a Toyota Prius towing one.

Possible, yes. Recommended, definitely not.

It's all about marketing.
 

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2016 Outback Premium 2.5 CVT w/EyeSight+SRVD
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2019 Subaru Outback
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200 pounds for all Gen 5 Outbacks, per Subaru
Well if that's the case a 2,500 trailer would have too low of tongue weight and likely be prone to sway. Trailer design can mitigate that somewhat, but I think that may be mainly boat trailers.
 

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2016 Outback Premium 2.5 CVT w/EyeSight+SRVD
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2017 2.5i Premium Lapis Blue
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In general tongue weight should be roughly 10% of the trailer weight. So for the Outback anything over 2000lbs becomes problematic. Too little tongue weight will cause handling and control issues. Can the Outback pull it? Sure. Can it do it safely? Not my call.
 

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2016 2.5i Limited, 2013 Tesla Model S 85
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10% tongue weight is just lawyers speaking.

I had trouble with too much tongue weight on a 1900 pound trailer. The rig "porpoised". On bumps the tail of my Outback would go down, nose up. Moved the motorcycles back on trailer until things pulled nicely. When operating near limits things get sensitive. Same trailer and loading on an ML-320 was barely noticed.

Anything over 1500 pounds really really needs trailer brakes. There are several ways to do this but the traditional brake control and brake power from tow vehicle is very difficult with an Outback.

You have an Outback and want to tow a trailer. You can either figure out how to do it, or give up the trailer, or give up the Outback. In addition to the Outback I now have an F-150.

Interesting thing: towing a SxS at the front of an 18' trailer is miserable with F-150 and Outback. But park the SxS over the trailer axles and just a bit forward and both tow sweetly.
 

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2019 Subaru Outback
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10% tongue weight is just lawyers speaking.
Not sure why you say that. The people who claim that are generally not related to manufacturers or sellers. Again though I think there are exceptions, such as I've heard boat trailers. I'm guessing it pertains to rear axle location.

But here's a simple demonstration.

 

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I've been wondering the same thing but haven't come to any conclusion yet but my personal situation at the moment means that I can't go traveling anyway. I do know that when hiking in the UK and Ireland I've seen some relatively large-looking caravans being towed by cars smaller than my 3.5R Outback. I really doubt that their vehicles are better suited or that their caravans are appreciably lighter. Magic involved? I'd not consider a 1-ton tow without effective trailer brakes. Tongue weight can always be tuned by moving things but there is the consideration that only the wet weight of the tow really matters. Put 1,000 pounds of water and needful stuff into a 2,000 pound trailer and it will still weigh 3,000 no matter what the manufacturer's brochure says about trailer weight.
 

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2011 outback 3.6R LT. 2015 Outback 2.5 (white) eyesight, tow pakage, skid plate, moon roof
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We have a 2019 Outback 3.6R Touring. We're considering purchasing a Happier Camper Traveler. The base weight of the version we'd like to get is ~2,500 lbs. I see that the tow capacity of the Outback 3.6R is 2,700 lbs. Will we be able to pull this trailer? If the base weight is 2,500 lbs, I'm assuming it would be at least 100-200 lbs. heavier when all loaded up?

Thanks.
I would bet you will add at least 800 pounds to the base weight. Full Propane tanks, water Spare tire. Load Leveler Hitch. Toyal weight of people and personal gear etc. On down hill you have no gears to hold speed down. Trailer brakes may not do the job. That is why they make and sll gas guzzling pick ups. The will do the job.
 

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2011 outback 3.6R LT. 2015 Outback 2.5 (white) eyesight, tow pakage, skid plate, moon roof
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And some will show a Toyota Prius towing one.

Possible, yes. Recommended, definitely not.

It's all about marketing.
That is why they make a Tundra. It will do the job.
 

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2011 outback 3.6R LT. 2015 Outback 2.5 (white) eyesight, tow pakage, skid plate, moon roof
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If you have never pulled a trailer you will be surprised how quickly the weight increases. Things like cooking equipment and chairs add up quickly. I would say that you need a larger towing capacity or smaller trailer. I was looking to do the same thing but the options are limited and $$$.
Beware of those that will chime in to say it's fine. Someone on the other side of the Internet isn't going to drop everything to come help you on the side of the road or help with the repair expenses you are risking.
Best of luck.
Maybe you should look for those campers hey tow behind a motorcycle!
 

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2019 3.6R Touring
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Discussion Starter #18
Somehow I missed all of these replies. I've come to the same conclusion that N4HHE mentioned—we either need to buy a motorhome, or sell the Outback and get a vehicle that can tow the trailer.

We have a Tesla Model X which can pull the weight, but towing a trailer with it drains the battery so much that it's not practical for road trips.
 
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