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2013 Outback 2.5L
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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone or does anyone currently tow 2 ATV's on a trailer with their 2.5 Outback? See the photo.
The bikes are approx 750lbs each So there's 1500lbs right off the bat. The trailer is 8x8ft the registration doc. records as weighing 500lbs so I'm pretty much at the 2000lbs mark with this load.

I've 'practice' towed down the road for a few miles and all was well, braking to a stop on a downhill part required quite a bit of force though. Can anyone with experience tell me if am I going to be safe towing this amount of weight with a few hills involved along the way? Thanks.
 

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I simply cannot abide useless people.
2006 2.5i and 2002 3.0 wagons.
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I'd want trailer brakes, but other than that your OB should handle that ok.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, I was trying to manage without trailer brakes, just taking it easy to the trailhead.
Can trailer brakes be fitted easily? Do I need Subaru specific ones or some universal type that go onto trailers? I should look into them really.
 

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2002 3.0 VDC Wag + 2018 2.5 Leg Ltd
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Thanks, I was trying to manage without trailer brakes, just taking it easy to the trailhead.
Can trailer brakes be fitted easily? Do I need Subaru specific ones or some universal type that go onto trailers? I should look into them really.

any trailer dealer can put trailer brakes on.


and you should want them. like when a child steps out in the road in front of you,....and the trailer is shoving the outback .


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I live in NYS, and any trailer weighing more then 1000 lbs. (load and trailer). "needs" brakes by law. (does not mean everyone follows it,...but its a good idea).
 

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Retrofitting brakes to a trailer can be cost prohibitive. Trading up for one already equipped may be more cost effective.
You will also need a brake controller installed in your tow vehicle. It's electronic and not that big a deal.

That all said, how far do you have to pull to get to the trailhead and what kinds of speeds are on the roads to there?
To me, if the trip is moderate (50-75 miles) and the speeds are low (up to 60mph), I might opt to just use that trailer as-is. If going at interstate speeds, that's much more energy to dissipate and then the brakes really make sense.
The brakes on the OB are adequate for the task. As you have already experienced; you will be pushing harder on the pedal and of course give yourself more stopping distance. No doubt it is safer with trailer brakes, but that doesn't necessarily mean your current setup is unsafe. Look into the cost and determine for yourself if it is worth it to you.
 

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Suge brakes are pretty simple and effective on atv trailers. 2000lbs stopping on anything other than dry pavement can be a long slide with locked up tires on the OB. 2000lbs I have towed that, with no trailer brakes its not ideal. ATV trailers don’t get dunked in saltwater like a boat might which case trailer brakes would be a good investment.
 

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2018 Dark Blue Pearl Outback 3.6R Premier
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I just installed a Hopkins brake controller with help from this post.

The electric brakes on my 1700lb trailer are wonderful. Feels the same as with no trailer.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
That all said, how far do you have to pull to get to the trailhead and what kinds of speeds are on the roads to there?
To me, if the trip is moderate (50-75 miles) and the speeds are low (up to 60mph), I might opt to just use that trailer as-is.
This is pretty much my trip distance, definitely no further and the speed I think I'd only be at the 45-50 mph mark as its mainly country roads with lots of curves and gentle hills. I need to try it once to get the feel of the load as-is.

Talking with some lads at work who snowmobile, they have pulled 2 sleds with similar weights with their cars without trailer brakes and never batted an eyelid at the weights.
"You'll be just fine" they say.

I'm feeling more and more confident already.

Thanks for the input guys.
 

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New York Trailer Inspection and registration law is Trailer weighing over 1000 lb unladen ( The weight of a vehicle when not loaded with goods)or a Trailer that weighs over 3000 lbs with its load check DMV FORM MV 529c I just went thru this with my local DMV. It would be Illegal for trailer dealers to sell you you these trailers in NY reg and Inspected in which they do.



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I live in NYS, and any trailer weighing more then 1000 lbs. (load and trailer). "needs" brakes by law. (does not mean everyone follows it,...but its a good idea).[/QUOTE]
 

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New York Trailer Inspection and registration law is Trailer weighing over 1000 lb unladen ( The weight of a vehicle when not loaded with goods)or a Trailer that weighs over 3000 lbs with its load check DMV FORM MV 529c I just went thru this with my local DMV. It would be Illegal for trailer dealers to sell you you these trailers in NY reg and Inspected in which they do.
thanks for the correction,

the way around the NYS annual inspections/ registration costs are to get a cheap Maine registration / plates through the mail.
(no annual inspection for trailers, and you don't need to drive out there).

I don't know if the local cops enforce NYS law on them maine plated trailers if they pull you over looking for reasons to write tickets.
 
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